Boy, four, chased down and attacked by a mob of wallabies in suburban park

Boy, four, left with deep cuts after being chased down and attacked by a mob of wallabies in suburban park

  • A Queensland boy was chased down and attacked by a mob of wallabies
  • His mother Riana Deacon posted photos of the injuries her son sustained online
  • The photos show the boy with deep lacerations to his face, back and underarm

A young mother was forced to fight off a mob of wallabies that chased down her son in a suburban park, scratching his body and face and leaving him with deep cuts. 

Cairns mother Riana Deacon took her two young sons for a walk at her local part at about 5.30pm on Thursday when the attack on four-year-old Elijah occurred. 

‘This attack was not at all provoked, in fact my children love animals and wallabies and are aware to stay away from wild animals and other peoples dogs etc,’ Miss Deacon wrote. 

A young boy (pictured) was set upon by a mob of wallabies who left him with deep scratches on his face and back as well as deeper lacerations under his arm

Riana Deacon caught the attack on her mobile phone as she rushed over to fight the wallabies off of her son (pictured)

Riana Deacon caught the attack on her mobile phone as she rushed over to fight the wallabies off of her son (pictured)

She said the mob of wallabies started to chase both her sons across the park when the youngest fell and was immediately set upon. 

Video of the incident showed Miss Deacon running to her son who could be heard screaming as the wallabies continue to attack him. 

‘I was fighting them off and trying to protect both of my children and call for help,’ Miss Deacon continued. 

The attack left her son with scratches across his back and face and extremely deep lacerations under his arm and in his armpit.

‘My son ended up being admitted to hospital and had to undergo procedures and sedation to fix up what the wallabies had caused,’ Miss Deacon wrote. 

‘Please please please just be aware that these cute little wallabies are not at all cute or kind, they are vicious and will follow you and attack you, even without you being close to them.’  

ADVICE IF ATTACKED BY A KANGAROO OR WALLABY

If it is a large male that has been displaying dominance behaviour, it may see you as a threat. 

Protect yourself and let the animal know you are not a threat by giving a short, deep cough, avoiding eye contact and crouching down as you move away.

Females and smaller male animals are less likely to be aggressive but may approach if they are used to being fed or have had a lot of human contact. 

Even though females are much smaller than males, they can scratch and kick and could pose a safety risk – particularly to small children.

As a last resort, if you can’t escape an attacking kangaroo or wallaby, roll up into a ball on the ground with your arm covering your neck and call for help. 

Try to roll or crawl away to a safe place.

Turning your back on it and running could be dangerous as a large male can easily outrun you and still kick at the same time. 

Turn side-on and protect the front of your body with your arms and keep your head as far away from the animal as possible to minimise the risk of being scratched on the face.

Source: Queensland Department of Environment and Science

 

 

 

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