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British drugs giant faces legal action

  • According to US court papers, pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca gave millions in bribes to Iraqi officials in a bid to win lucrative health care deals 
  • The money was allegedly used to buy rockets and explosives for the Mahdi Army 
  • The militia waged war against UK and US soldiers after the invasion of Iraq

A British pharmaceutical company has been accused of funding an Iraqi terrorist group that killed hundreds of Allied troops in the Gulf War.

According to US court papers, AstraZeneca gave millions of pounds in bribes to Iraqi officials in a bid to win lucrative health care deals.

This money was allegedly used to buy rockets and explosives for the Mahdi Army, a militia that waged war against UK and US soldiers after the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

According to US court papers, AstraZeneca gave millions of pounds in bribes to Iraqi officials in a bid to win lucrative health care deals. This money was allegedly used to buy rockets and explosives for the Mahdi Army. Pictured: Heavily armed Mahdi Army troops in 2004

The claim is included in a civil lawsuit filed in a US Federal Court against AstraZeneca and several other pharmaceutical firms, and includes 27 pages of itemised deaths and injuries in Mahdi Army attacks from 2005 and 2009.

No British troops are included in the claim but The Mail on Sunday understands US lawyers are considering a similar action here.

The firms all strongly deny the claims. Last night an AstraZeneca spokesperson said: ‘AstraZeneca has a zero-tolerance policy for bribery and corruption.

‘We are disheartened that anyone would suggest that we have any connection to terrorism-related activity.’

The claim is included in a civil lawsuit filed in a US Federal Court against AstraZeneca and several other pharmaceutical firms, and includes 27 pages of itemised deaths and injuries in Mahdi Army attacks from 2005 and 2009 

The claim is included in a civil lawsuit filed in a US Federal Court against AstraZeneca and several other pharmaceutical firms, and includes 27 pages of itemised deaths and injuries in Mahdi Army attacks from 2005 and 2009 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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