British security guard accused of spying for Russia at UK embassy in Berlin

British security guard accused of spying for Russia at UK embassy in Berlin will be extradited to London this week after losing battle to stay in Germany

  • David Smith was arrested last August at his rented flat in Potsdam
  • It was alleged that the 57-year-old had offered names of British officials to Russian spies 
  • Extradition decision was made in late March and he will arrive back in UK on Wednesday
  •  He will appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Thursday morning

A British security guard accused of spying for Russia at the UK embassy in Berlin will be extradited to London this week after losing his battle to stay in Germany. 

David Smith was arrested last August after it was alleged that he had offered names of British officials to Russian spies.

The former employee of the British embassy in Berlin, 57, will arrive back in the UK on Wednesday.

On Thursday morning he will appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court.   

David Smith (pictured) was arrested last August after it was alleged that he had offered names of British officials to Russian spies

Speaking to the Telegraph, the state court of Brandenburg said that it had accepted an extradition request by the Government.

Mr Smith had been detained in Germany on suspicion of spying for Russia. 

The extradition decision was made in late March, according to a court spokesman, after the request was made at the end of 2021 by British authorities. 

The 57-year-old was arrested at home in Potsdam last summer after German and British security services discovered he had been giving information to Russia for money.

It was alleged that he had been giving the information to Russia since at least November 2020. 

According to their findings, Mr Smith is believed to have sold information about people entering and leaving the embassy.  

The alleged material that was passed on is said to have been classified below secret level.  

Last December his lawyer said the 57-year-old would fight the extradition request.

He argued that the former security guard had moved to Germany 16 years ago and considered it his home country.  

Pictures taken at the time of Mr Smith’s arrest revealed that he had a giant Russian flag in plain sight in his flat, as well as a collection of Soviet military caps

Pictures taken at the time of Mr Smith’s arrest revealed that he had a giant Russian flag in plain sight in his flat, as well as a collection of Soviet military caps

Milder prison terms are generally handed to those selling state secrets in Germany in comparison to Britain’s Official Secrets Act.  

At the time of Mr Smith’s arrest, photographs showed a large Russian flag in his rented flat. 

He was also seen to have a collection of Soviet military caps and shelves piled high with volumes of military history as well as Russian language books.

Mr Smith also had a copy of the spy novel A Murder of Quality written by John Le Carre in 1962, and David Icke’s self-published book The Trigger which is full of conspiracy theories.

And the 57-year-old had a small East German flag on the mantelpiece as well as a Russian naval shield.

He was also seen to have a collection of Soviet military caps and shelves piled high with volumes of military history as well as Russian language books

He was also seen to have a collection of Soviet military caps and shelves piled high with volumes of military history as well as Russian language books

There was also a toy dog that sported the green hat of the Russian border guards service.  

Newspaper Bild had reported that Mr Smith owned a silver Ford Fiesta and joked that the hatchback car was different to the Aston Martin sports cars driven by Britain’s fictional spy James Bond.  

It described Mr Smith as living in an ‘anonymous, modern new building’. 

The article added: ‘No Aston Martin is parked in front of it, but the spy’s Ford Fiesta.’

The Foreign Office had sources confirm at the time of his arrest that private contractors working at British embassies are subject to strict checks.  

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