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Britons are facing a shortage of HALLOUMI if EU plans to give it protected status go ahead

Hard cheese! Britons are facing a shortage of HALLOUMI if EU plans to give it protected status go ahead

  • Britons could soon be facing a halloumi shortage if EU rules are to be adopted
  • Cyprus farmers clashed with officials over plans to give cheese protected status
  • Officials want Cypriot halloumi to get EU protected designation of origin status
  • But cow herders and cheese producers in Cyrus fear rules will cut production

The salty, chewy cheese has become increasingly popular among middle-class families, who enjoy it cooked at barbecues or in wraps and salads.

But Britons could soon be facing a halloumi shortage if EU rules governing its production are adopted.

Farmers in Cyprus, which considers itself the home of halloumi, have clashed with government officials over plans to give the cheese protected status.

The government would like Cypriot halloumi to be granted EU protected designation of origin status, which is designed to protect regional foods from imitation (file photo)

The government would like Cypriot halloumi to be granted EU protected designation of origin status, which is designed to protect regional foods from imitation.

The strict rules would stipulate that halloumi must be 50 per cent Cypriot sheep and goats’ milk – rather than the current 20 per cent – and 50 per cent Cypriot cows’ milk.

But cow herders and cheese producers fear the rules will cut production. Britain is the biggest market for halloumi, buying 40 per cent of exports.

The new rules state that each goat and sheep must be of a certain breed native to the island. 

But local herds are still suffering from a cull after an outbreak of scrapie a decade ago. 

Farmers would also have to ensure their sheep, goats and cows graze on five specific plants – but three of them are protected.

But cow herders and cheese producers fear the rules will cut production. Britain is the biggest market for halloumi, buying 40 per cent of exports (file photo)

But cow herders and cheese producers fear the rules will cut production. Britain is the biggest market for halloumi, buying 40 per cent of exports (file photo)

Giorgos Petrou, of the Cyprus Dairy Producers Association, told The Sunday Telegraph: ‘If the new designation is adopted, it will be a disaster for halloumi makers.

‘It would cut exports by 60 per cent because there will be a lot less halloumi being produced.’

The Cypriot agriculture ministry said cheese makers’ complaints had been examined by officials but rejected.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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