Buttigieg claps back at AOC’: I don’t want Dems going into 2020 ‘one hand tied behind our back’

Pete Buttigieg exacerbated the war of words with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday after she criticized his approach to fundraising as protecting ‘big money politics.’

Ocasio-Cortez’s comments came as she lambasted the South Bend, Indiana mayor for claiming a Democrat won’t be able to take on Donald Trump with ‘pocket change.’

‘What I’m saying is we can’t go into this fight against Donald Trump with one hand tied behind our back,’ Buttigieg clarified in an interview with Fox News Sunday.

He also pointed out that Trump’s reelection campaign has already brought in $125 million.

‘They will pull out all of the stops to stay in power, and I think we have a responsibility to the country to make sure that we go into this fight as Democrats with everything that we’ve got and not unilaterally disarm it,’ he continued.

Pete Buttigieg responded after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez claimed he was defending ‘big money politics.’ He said he doesn’t want Democrats to go into 2020 with ‘one hand hand tied behind our back’

In an interview this week, Buttigieg called Elizabeth Warren's small-donor campaign 'pocket change'

In an interview this week, Buttigieg called Elizabeth Warren’s small-donor campaign ‘pocket change’ 

Ocasio-Cortez bashed Buttigieg for his comments, claiming those small-donor grassroots campaign are beating him

Ocasio-Cortez bashed Buttigieg for his comments, claiming those small-donor grassroots campaign are beating him

Ocasio-Cortez, a progressive freshman representative, made her comments toward Buttigieg in reposting a video where he bashed fellow 2020 candidate Elizabeth Warren’s small donor strategy. She claimed campaigns that only take in small-donor grassroots money are more successful than his.

‘Small-dollar grassroots campaigns, aka what Buttegieg insults here as ‘pocket change,’ out-fundraise him by millions,’ the 30-year-old Democratic socialist wrote on Twitter.

‘Our nation’s leaders should be working to end the era of big money politics, not protect it,’ she continued.

Warren is a front-runner candidate, and in some polls has emerged as the No. 1 Democratic candidate most likely to win the party’s nomination to take on Trump in 2020. She is steering clear of accepting large donations.

In an interview with Good Luck America this week, Buttigieg said, ‘We’re not going to beat Trump with pocket change.’

But the openly gay candidate insisted that his comments weren’t meant to discourage or bring down grassroots campaigning, but remind Democrats to remain competitive against a candidate with a large amount of money on hand.

‘You don’t go from mayor of South Bend to a competitive presidential candidate without knowing a thing or two about grassroots campaigning,’ Buttigieg, who regularly falls within the top five Democratic candidates, said on Sunday.

‘My campaign is fueled by the contributions of almost 600,000 individual donors and most of those are small contributions,’ he shot back at Ocasio-Cortez’s tweet.

Warren has recently emerged as the front-runner candidate among likely Democratic primary voters

Warren has recently emerged as the front-runner candidate among likely Democratic primary voters

Ocasio-Cortez endorsed Bernie Sanders on Saturday

Ocasio-Cortez endorsed Bernie Sanders on Saturday

On Saturday, Ocasio-Cortez officially issued her endorsement of fellow Democratic socialist candidate Bernie Sanders. She appeared along side the Vermont independent senator at his rally in Queens a few weeks after his heart attack.

There was speculation that the millennial congresswoman could issue her powerful endorsement to progressive Warren instead of Sanders.

Before running for office, Ocasio-Cortez worked as an organizer for Sanders’ unsuccessful Democratic presidential bid in 2016 against Hillary Clinton.

She now represents the 14th district of New York, which includes sections of The Bronx and Queens.

Buttigieg has a polling average of more than 5 per cent among likely Democratic primary voters, while Warren has an average of around 25 per cent.

In lamenting about the divided state of the U.S. political climate, Buttigieg said that going too far to the left can make matters worse.

‘We can govern in a very bold and forward-leaning direction, but we’ve got to make sure we do it in a way that moves toward unifying rather than further polarizing the American people,’ the retired Naval officer said in his Sunday interview.

‘I think that we have a chance to build an American majority around bold action, but it is the case that we could wreck that majority through purity tests,’ Buttigieg said.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk