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Calls to end road-side drug testing because Australians are losing license without being impaired

‘Imagine losing your licence because you had a beer days ago?’ How drivers are losing their licences in road-side drug tests – which picks up use WEEKS later

  • Call for end of the war on drugs claiming test  doesn’t improve road safety 
  • NSW Greens MP Cate Faehrmann said the testing is ‘arbitrary and unreliable’ 
  • Call for evidence based roadside drug testing programme that tests impairment
  • ‘Imagine losing your license for driving after having a beer a couple of days ago’ 

Road-side drug testing should be reformed because Australians are losing their right to drive without actually being impaired, a NSW MP has said.

Cate Faehrmann, a Greens MP and spokeswoman on drug law, is calling for an end to the testing which she claims has nothing to do with improving road safety. 

Thousands of motorists are suspended from driving every year after testing positive for drugs in their system, despite the fact they may be sober when they are tested.

Cocaine can be detected in a person’s urine for anything up to 14 days while MDMA can be detected for up to three days. 

‘Roadside drug testing in NSW is arbitrary and unreliable,’ she said on Tuesday.  

Cate Faehrmann, NSW Greens MP and spokeswoman on drug law, is calling for an end to the testing which she claims has nothing to do with improving road safety (stock)

The regime in NSW has nothing to do with improving road safety and is simply an extension of the failed war on drugs,' Ms Faehrmann said

The regime in NSW has nothing to do with improving road safety and is simply an extension of the failed war on drugs,’ Ms Faehrmann said 

‘The regime in NSW has nothing to do with improving road safety and is simply an extension of the failed war on drugs.’ 

The Greens are calling to reform roadside drug testing for an evidence-based programme that actually tests for impairment. 

From July 2015 to June 2016 nearly 10,000 people were charged with drug driving offences in NSW. Of that number 98.3 per cent were found guilty. 

Testing positive for cocaine or morphine or other ‘illicit drugs’ carries a maximum fine of $1,100 in NSW and is an automatic disqualification of up to six months.   

'Drivers are being convicted despite no evidence of impairment or threat to road safety,' Ms Faehrmann said (stock)

‘Drivers are being convicted despite no evidence of impairment or threat to road safety,’ Ms Faehrmann said (stock)

‘We know that drugs like marijuana will stay in people’s system for days, or even weeks, after consumption. This means drivers are being convicted despite no evidence of impairment or threat to road safety,’ Ms Faehrmann said.

‘That is why the Greens are calling for an end to roadside drug testing until an evidence based roadside drug testing programme is introduced that actually tests for impairment, rather than simply presence of drugs.

‘Imagine losing your licence for driving after having a beer a couple of days ago. It sounds ridiculous, but this is exactly what is happening to people who might smoke a joint and drive a few days later.’

Daily Mail has contacted NSW Police for comment. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk