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Career experts reveal the trick to the perfect ‘elevator pitch’ when job hunting 

How to sell yourself in 25 words or less: Career experts reveal how to craft the perfect ‘elevator pitch’ when job hunting – and what NOT to say

  • Professionals suggest ‘selling yourself’ in 25 words or less in emails or resumes
  • Highlight your standout features and make sure everything is spelt correctly 
  • Keep points relevant to the job you’re going for, don’t include all experience 
  • Once you find your unique selling point you will stand out from the crowd 

If you’re looking to propel yourself into a new career experts recommend ‘selling’ your expertise in 25 words or less – but how do you create the perfect pitch?

According to Seek Australia it’s as easy as highlighting your best professional features, ensuring every word is spelled correctly and adheres to common grammar rules and only mentions points relevant to the job you’re going for, irrespective of what your past experience may be.

‘With more pressure on people’s time than ever before, recruiters and employers can benefit from knowing your unique experiences, ambitions, and strengths in 25 words or less,’ the website read.

Seek Australia says to highlight your best professional features, ensure every word is spelt correctly and only mentions points relevant to the job you’re going for (stock image)

1. CONDENSE YOUR WORK HISTORY INTO A SENTENCE

Think about the jobs you’ve worked in the past and how the job you’re going for could be enhanced by that experience.

Your goal in a 25-word pitch is to get across how capable you are, how long you’ve been doing work like this, and some key skills you possess that will help you slot straight into the role.

A good example of this is: ‘I’m a self-motivated, creative copywriter with five years of marketing and advertising experience, specialising in digital content with a keen interest in social media’.

Employers are often enticed by leadership skills, so it’s imperative you mention one or two of these, and if you’ve ever been given an award in your field or made a key difference, highlight it as your unique selling point.

If you get called in for an in-person interview, have relevant examples in mind to highlight ways you were self-motivated and creative, so the potential employer knows these weren’t just empty words.

Your goal in a 25 word pitch is to get across how capable you are, how long you've been doing work like this, and key skills you possess that will help you slot straight in (stock image)

Your goal in a 25 word pitch is to get across how capable you are, how long you’ve been doing work like this, and key skills you possess that will help you slot straight in (stock image)

2. ENSURE SPELLING AND GRAMMAR IS CORRECT

There is nothing worse than reading a sentence that doesn’t make sense, or contains an incorrect word, because this becomes jarring for the reader and they won’t want to continue.

Ensure there are no mistakes when you send in your email or notation and check it makes sense with a few friends and family members around you.

How do you stand out in an interview room? 

* Find your unique selling point and share it with the employer.

* Highlight your leadership skills in particular.

* Show relevant examples of how you overcame obstacles in previous jobs.

* Answer questions directly and follow up with a question of your own. 

A good sentence would look like: ‘I’m an in-house corporate lawyer with over eight years’ experience, specialising in mergers and acquisitions with a focus on South-East Asia’.

In this example there is an appropriate hyphen between in-house, an apostrophe after years and South-East Asia is written in capitals.

These could all easily be missed after reading it through once, so try to keep an eye out as you check and re-check.

3. ONLY COMMUNICATE SOMETHING THAT WILL HELP IN THE ROLE

Individuals usually have a wealth of experience to offer their employer – across a great many fields – but in your 25 word intro just stick to talking about skills relevant to the job at hand.

‘There is no point including in your personal summary that you spent six years working in hospitality when you are seeking a new career in the construction management industry,’ the Seek website read.

‘Think of key attributes needed for the role you’re seeking and tailor your personal summary to respond to those needs.’

Individuals usually have a wealth of experience to offer their employer - across a great many fields - but in your 25 word intro just stick to talking about skills relevant to the job at hand

Individuals usually have a wealth of experience to offer their employer – across a great many fields – but in your 25 word intro just stick to talking about skills relevant to the job at hand

Try to write a few different personal statements before you agree on sending one, as practice makes perfect.

When you do end up in the interview room continue your good work by asking relevant questions about the role, to show you’re genuinely interested.

Ask questions of your potential employer by using some of your past career history as an example, so you can show lived experiences of what you’re talking about.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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