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Chelsea Flower Show is to focus on climate change in 2020

Chelsea Flower Show is to focus on climate change in 2020 and will demonstrate how trees and plants can help to save the planet

  • The Royal Horticultural Society has unveiled the line-up of garden designers
  • They detailed how as woodland management and flood prevention will dominate
  • Joe Perkins, who won a gold medal this year, will focus on the UK’s tree cover 

The Chelsea Flower Show is to highlight how trees and plants can battle climate change, the Royal Horticultural Society revealed yesterday.

Unveiling the line-up of garden designers for next May’s event, the RHS detailed how issues such as woodland management and flood prevention will come to the fore.

Joe Perkins, who won a gold medal for his garden at Chelsea this year, will focus on the need to increase UK tree cover as the climate changes.

The Chelsea Flower Show is to highlight how trees and plants can battle climate change

Every structure in his 2020 garden, Growing the Future, will be made from timber, including UK-sourced and recycled wood. 

‘It’s about trying to open up the discussion about… how resilient trees are for us and our cities,’ he said.

Award-winning design duo Hugo Bugg and Charlotte Harris said their communal residential garden’s planting ‘will be led by looking at resilient plants that are suitable for the climate challenges of urban spaces’.

Joe Perkins (pictured), who won a gold medal for his garden at Chelsea this year, will focus on the need to increase UK tree cover as the climate changes

Joe Perkins (pictured), who won a gold medal for his garden at Chelsea this year, will focus on the need to increase UK tree cover as the climate changes

Elsewhere, any carbon emissions required to make the Yeo Valley Organic Garden will be offset at the dairy company’s farm in Somerset.

Rose Gore Browne, the RHS’s Chelsea show manager, said: ‘As gardens and horticulture are key to helping combat climate change, it is very encouraging to see a number of gardens addressing these issues and more designers and growers adopting suitable practices.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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