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Child asthma cases can triple at the start of the school year, researchers warn

Child asthma cases can triple at the start of the school year as returning to the classroom exposes pupils to coughs and colds, researchers warn

  • Number of childhood asthma cases triples at the beginning of the school year 
  • Research shows asthma attacks in children aged one to 14 spike in September
  • Experts claims the rise is probably due to spreading coughs and colds and changes in the weather

The number of childhood asthma cases triples at the beginning of the school year, research suggests.

Figures show a spike in asthma attacks for children aged between one and 14 when they return to school in September.

Experts said this is probably because of coughs and colds spread in the classroom, as well as changing weather.

New figures have shown a spike in asthma attacks for children aged between one and 14 when they return to school in September (stock photo)

A report in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health analysed the number of visits to GPs for asthma between 2012 and 2016.

They found that rates of GP appointments for asthma fell during school holidays, followed by an increase at the beginning of September.

A&E visits for worsening asthma also peaked at the start of the school year.

Daily visits to GPs were more than three times as high in the back to school period as during the summer holidays for children up to the age of four. And it was more than twice as high for five to 14 year olds.

Researchers said that multiple factors are likely to be involved including changes in the weather, air pollution, the stress of starting a new school year, and seasonal increases in circulating viruses (stock photo)

Researchers said that multiple factors are likely to be involved including changes in the weather, air pollution, the stress of starting a new school year, and seasonal increases in circulating viruses (stock photo)

Experts said coughs and colds, mould and changing weather are all possible reasons for the spike in cases.

Researchers said that multiple factors are likely to be involved including changes in the weather, air pollution, the stress of starting a new school year, and seasonal increases in circulating viruses.

‘These results support the need for further preventable work to reduce the impact of [back to school] asthma in children,’ they concluded.

The figures were released by Public Health England.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk