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Chinese Communist Party newspaper calls for ‘arrogant’ Australia to be taught a lesson

Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece the Global Times says it’s time Australia was taught a lesson.

The newspaper’s editorial said it would make sense to cut Australian wine and beef imports to do a better deal with the United States.

The editorial comes as China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi blamed Canberra for tensions between the two countries after a meeting with Australia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs, Julie Bishop.

Mr Wang said on Tuesday the relationship between Australia and China ‘encountered some difficulties’, but Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said it was ‘good and frank’.

Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece the Global Times says it’s time Australia was taught a lesson (pictured is Australia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop and China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi)

Pictured is Julie Bishop

Pictured is Wang Yi

The editorial comes as China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi (pictured, right) blamed Canberra for tensions between the two countries after a meeting with Australia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs, Julie Bishop (pictured, left)

‘It is necessary for China to leave Australia hanging for a while,’ the Global Times argued in an editorial on Wednesday morning.

‘Instead of being too quick to bury the hatchet whenever Canberra tries to put a smile on its face.’

‘China does not have to throw away Sino-Australia relations. China just needs to slow their relationship for a period.’

The paper suggests import reductions would teach ‘arrogant’ Australia a lesson, which other countries would follow.

‘The scope of import reductions could be limited. Last year, Australia exported $76.45 billion in goods to China,’ the editorial said.

‘Lowering Aussie exports by $6.45 billion would send cold chills up and down the spine of Australia. 

‘Of course, it would be an even greater shock if the import reductions totaled $10 billion.’

It also says the prime minister doesn’t have to visit this year, but instead can visit ‘in a few years’, while ministerial visits should be slowed down.

Mr Wang (pictured, left) said on Tuesday the relationship between Australia and China 'encountered some difficulties', but Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (pictured, right) said it was 'good and frank'

Mr Wang (pictured, left) said on Tuesday the relationship between Australia and China ‘encountered some difficulties’, but Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (pictured, right) said it was ‘good and frank’

But non-government exchanges should stay the same.

‘Chinese students and tourists in Australia should not be bothered,’ the Global Times said.

Beijing is especially cranky about Australia’s proposed foreign interference laws, following media reporting of Chinese influence in local politics.

‘We have a good, frank relationship with China, it’s a very strong one,’ Mr Turnbull told reporters on Wednesday.

‘You could not imagine modern Australia without the 1.2 million Australians of Chinese heritage.’

Mr Turnbull said Australia has a free media: ‘That’s the nature of our democracy … everyone around the world understands that.’ 

Mr Turnbull also defended a Liberal MP who used parliamentary privilege to allege a Chinese-Australian billionaire (pictured) was involved in bribing late UN president John Ashe

Mr Turnbull also defended a Liberal MP who used parliamentary privilege to allege a Chinese-Australian billionaire (pictured) was involved in bribing late UN president John Ashe

Foreign Minister Wang Yi had talks with his counterpart Julie Bishop on the sidelines of a G20 meeting in Argentina on Tuesday morning.

Following the meeting, which Ms Bishop said involved a warm and positive discussion, Mr Wang said the relationship ‘encountered some difficulties’.

‘If Australia sincerely hopes that the relations between the two countries will return to the right track … they must break away from traditional thinking, take off their coloured glasses, and look at China’s development from a positive angle,’ Mr Wang said, according to a translated press statement. 

Mr Wang told Ms Bishop he was looking forward to hosting her for their annual talks, to be held this year in Beijing. 

Mr Turnbull also defended a Liberal MP who used parliamentary privilege to allege a Chinese-Australian billionaire was involved in bribing late UN president John Ashe.

Mr Hastie (pictured) used parliamentary privilege to announce a man known as 'CC-3' in FBI documents about the bribery case is political donor Dr Chau Chak Wing

Mr Hastie (pictured) used parliamentary privilege to announce a man known as ‘CC-3’ in FBI documents about the bribery case is political donor Dr Chau Chak Wing

‘The allegations are not new, they’ve been made elsewhere and they are the subject of legal proceedings,’ Mr Turnbull said.

‘I’m not going to comment on a member of parliament using their right … it’s a right that was hard won, it’s a fundamental part of our parliamentary democracy.

‘The first I learned of Mr Hastie’s remarks was after he had given them … I had no forewarning of it.’

Mr Hastie used parliamentary privilege to announce a man known as ‘CC-3’ in FBI documents about the bribery case is political donor Dr Chau Chak Wing.

‘The same man who co-conspired to bribe the United Nations general assembly president John Ashe, the same man with extensive contacts in the Chinese Communist Party,’ Mr Hastie said in parliament on Tuesday night. 

Australia’s proposed foreign intervention laws have angered China, as have claims the Chinese government is seeking to influence Australian politics.

Australia's proposed foreign intervention laws have angered China, as have claims the Chinese government is seeking to influence Australian politics (pictured are Ms Bishop and Mr Wang)

Australia’s proposed foreign intervention laws have angered China, as have claims the Chinese government is seeking to influence Australian politics (pictured are Ms Bishop and Mr Wang)

Wednesday’s editorial attacked Australia’s media and politicians for speaking out about foreign interference via political donations.

‘Sino-Australia relations have remained on a steady downward slope since last year due to distorted reporting on behalf of Australian media and remarks made by Australian politicians on China’s alleged “interference and infiltration in Australian internal affairs”,’ the paper stated.

‘Such remarks have not only created obstacles in the development of bilateral relations between the two countries, but also have had a negative impact on Chinese living in Australia. 

‘Recently, Australian officials made unfriendly remarks toward China by actively hurling accusations.’

The Global Times is owned and published by the People’s Daily, the official newspaper of the Chinese Communist Party.

Wednesday's editorial attacked Australia's media and politicians for speaking out about foreign interference via political donations (pictured are Ms Bishop and Mr Wang)

Wednesday’s editorial attacked Australia’s media and politicians for speaking out about foreign interference via political donations (pictured are Ms Bishop and Mr Wang)

 

 

 



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