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Chris Hemsworth calls for Australia Day to be moved to a different date 

‘Why celebrate on a day that marks such pain, sorrow and deep loss?’ Chris Hemsworth calls for Australia Day to be moved to a different date

Chris Hemsworth has called for Australia Day, which occurs on January 26, to be moved to a different date. 

Taking to Instagram on Sunday, the 36-year-old shared a photo of an Aboriginal flag with ‘Change the date’ written in the centre. 

The actor wrote at length in his caption: ‘Not sure why we can’t celebrate Australia on any of the other 364 days in the year? 

‘Why celebrate on a day that marks such pain, sorrow and deep loss?’ Taking to Instagram, on Sunday, Chris Hemsworth (pictured) called for Australia Day to be moved to a different date

‘Why do we have to celebrate on a day that for our First Nations people marks such pain, sorrow and deep loss? 

‘What if we made this day about reflection and respect for the oldest surviving civilisation, how they may be feeling and come together with solidarity, love and empathy. We should stand together united in our commitment to reconciliation. 

‘Changing the date is the first step. No one loses anything but a lot of people benefit greatly. Love you all #changethedate,’ he concluded. 

Speaking up: Taking to Instagram on Sunday, the 36-year-old shared a photo of an Aboriginal flag with 'Change the date' written in the centre

Speaking up: Taking to Instagram on Sunday, the 36-year-old shared a photo of an Aboriginal flag with ‘Change the date’ written in the centre

The actor wrote at length in his caption: 'Not sure why we can’t celebrate Australia on any of the other 364 days in the year? Why do we have to celebrate on a day that for our First Nations people marks such pain, sorrow and deep loss?

The actor wrote at length in his caption: ‘Not sure why we can’t celebrate Australia on any of the other 364 days in the year? Why do we have to celebrate on a day that for our First Nations people marks such pain, sorrow and deep loss?

He went on: 'What if we made this day about reflection and respect for the oldest surviving civilisation, how they may be feeling and come together with solidarity, love and empathy'

He went on: ‘What if we made this day about reflection and respect for the oldest surviving civilisation, how they may be feeling and come together with solidarity, love and empathy’ 

Chris is far from the only person speaking out against the Australia Day celebrations, as a growing ‘Change the Date’ movement gains more momentum every year.  

Thousands of people joined Invasion Day protests in cities across Australia on Sunday to mark the beginning of British colonisation of the vast continent.

January 26 is officially recognised as Australia Day, a public holiday to celebrate the origins of the modern nation and is commemorated with fireworks, concerts and citizenship ceremonies.

Chris is not alone: Thousands of people joined Invasion Day protests in cities across Australia on Sunday to mark the beginning of British colonisation of the vast continent. Pictured; Protesters in Melbourne on Sunday

Chris is not alone: Thousands of people joined Invasion Day protests in cities across Australia on Sunday to mark the beginning of British colonisation of the vast continent. Pictured; Protesters in Melbourne on Sunday

History: The date is a time of mourning for indigenous Australians, who have inhabited the land for 65,000 years and view the arrival of British settlers in 1788 as heralding two centuries years of pain and suffering

History: The date is a time of mourning for indigenous Australians, who have inhabited the land for 65,000 years and view the arrival of British settlers in 1788 as heralding two centuries years of pain and suffering

However, the date is a time of mourning for indigenous Australians, who have inhabited the land for 65,000 years and view the arrival of British settlers in 1788 as heralding two centuries years of pain and suffering.

Annual rallies have steadily grown in size as protesters bring attention to injustices faced by indigenous people and call on the government to change the date of Australia Day.

It was only formally established as a nation-wide celebration in 1994.

Celebrations: January 26 is officially recognised as Australia Day. It was only formally established as a nation-wide celebration in 1994.  Pictured: Celebrations at the Opera House in Sydney on Sunday

Celebrations: January 26 is officially recognised as Australia Day. It was only formally established as a nation-wide celebration in 1994.  Pictured: Celebrations at the Opera House in Sydney on Sunday

 

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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