Christine McGuinness flashes her legs in denim hot pants in candid Autism Acceptance Day post

Christine McGuinness has called for the Wear It Blue campaign to be renamed Wear It You, in a candid Instagram post to mark Autism Acceptance Day on Saturday.

The reality star, 34, who is mother to three children with autism, looked incredible as she flashed her bronzed legs in distressed denim hot pants and a white top, while sitting on a log in a picturesque field.

Her bleached blonde tresses cascaded over her shoulders in gorgeous curls and she beamed from ear-to-ear while clutching a paper cup.

Hot stuff: Christine McGuinness flashed her legs in a pair of denim hot pants as she called for the Wear It Blue campaign to be renamed in a candid Autism Acceptance Day post on Saturday

Christine was diagnosed with the condition last year, and shares three children on the spectrum, Penelope, eight, Leo, also eight, and Felicity, six, with husband Paddy.

The former Real Housewives of Cheshire personality explained how the colour derives from a historic belief that ‘only males could be autistic’, and called for representation among girls too.

In her caption, she wrote: ‘Happy Autism Acceptance Day [sunflower emoji]

‘PLEASE READ AND SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THIS [multi-coloured hearts] 

Opening up: She explained how the colour derives from a historic belief that 'only males could be autistic', and called for representation among girls too

Opening up: She explained how the colour derives from a historic belief that ‘only males could be autistic’, and called for representation among girls too

‘I believe the ‘Wear it Blue’ for autism campaign should be renamed ‘Wear it You’

‘The campaign is outdated and not inclusive at all.

‘”Wear it blue” was created because a long time ago people believed that only males could be autistic.

‘As an autistic female with two autistic daughters and one autistic son, ‘wear it blue’ misrepresents us and the whole point of campaigning is for inclusivity and understanding for all.

Educating: In her caption, she wrote: 'Happy Autism Acceptance Day [sunflower emoji]'

Educating: In her caption, she wrote: ‘Happy Autism Acceptance Day [sunflower emoji]’

‘Many people still believe there are more autistic boys than girls.. I believe girls are more likely to mask, hide their symptoms and therefore go undiagnosed or completely missed far too often giving a false ratio in the amount of male/female autistics diagnosed.

‘I like “Wear it You” as this gives each and every person the choice to decide what colour they would like to wear at school or work for autism acceptance week. As we know each and every individual is completely different and that includes autistic people too.

‘#WearItYou is individual yet fully inclusive [loved-up emoji]

‘Let me know your thoughts, I am open to conversation and ideas on this [multi-coloured hearts].

Family: She was diagnosed with the disorder last year, and shares three children on the spectrum, Penelope, eight, Leo, also eight, and Felicity, six, with husband Paddy

Family: She was diagnosed with the disorder last year, and shares three children on the spectrum, Penelope, eight, Leo, also eight, and Felicity, six, with husband Paddy 

‘#AutismAcceptanceDay #Inclusivity #UntilEveryoneUnderstands #AutismAwareness

‘[sunflower emoji] This photo because I wanted pics in a sunflower field but typically it started to rain so I stopped for a cuppa instead☕️[laughing emoji]❤️.’

In December last year, the BBC aired a documentary featuring the McGuinness clan called Our Family and Autism, Paddy and Christine.

During the show, the couple spoke to autistic children about their experiences and consulted with development experts about their brood.

They also dispelled the dangerous myths surrounding links with autism and vaccines with leading scientists, before the show followed Christine on her own journey to discovering she too is autistic.

Elsewhere in the show, Paddy went to a secondary school to speak to two children, Jack and Maggie, about their experience of higher education, after worrying about his own children making the transition.

Paddy was then helped by speaking to former footballer Paul Scholes, whose 16-year-old son is non-verbal and autistic.

He said: ‘The biggest thing that he said that really resonated, is about not caring what people think. I don’t care what people think either but obviously I do, because I get het up.

‘If anybody mentioned the word autism to me I would say “I don’t want to speak about it, I don’t want to think about it.” Now I’m finally talking about autism, I just wish I hadn’t spent so much time trapped by the fear of it all.’

Power couple: In December last year, the BBC aired a documentary featuring the McGuinness clan called Our Family and Autism, Paddy and Christine

Power couple: In December last year, the BBC aired a documentary featuring the McGuinness clan called Our Family and Autism, Paddy and Christine 

***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk