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Colourised pictures show how Britain enjoyed beach holidays in 1890

How we did like to be beside the seaside: Colourised pictures show how Britain enjoyed beach holidays in 1890 as we prepare to embrace UK staycations once again

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Britons have hit the beaches this week with temperatures soaring as the country prepares to embrace staycations once again.

The Met Office has forecast highs of 82F (28C) today as temperatures continue to rise across the UK amid the coronavirus lockdown.

And colourised pictures of how Britain enjoyed beach holidays back in 1890 have been revealed as British vacations look set to become the norm due to the impact of Covid-19.

The 19th century seaside views have been brought to life in colour showing beach hotspots across the UK.   

The new images show packed seafronts from the popular holiday destinations of Blackpool to Great Yarmouth.

Blackpool became a major hub of tourism after a railway was constructed to connect the town to the industrialised regions of northern England in the 1840s.

Blackpool was a thriving resort back in 1881 with a population of 14,000 and a promenade boasting piers, fortune-tellers, public houses, trams, donkey rides, fish-and-chip shops and theatres.

Blackpool is a hugely popular seaside resort in the UK - pictured people enjoying the beach hotspot in July 2019. In 1881, the town was a booming resort with a population of 14,000 and a promenade boasting piers, fortune-tellers, public houses, trams, donkey rides (still seen today), fish-and-chip shops and theatres

Blackpool, in north west England, is seen packed with people in the 19th century with the North Pier in the background (left) as dozens of people enjoy the beach hotspot in July 2019 in a second image (right). Blackpool became a major hub of tourism after a railway was constructed to connect the town to the industrialised regions of northern England in the 1840s. Blackpool was a thriving resort back in 1881 with a population of 14,000 and a promenade boasting piers, fortune-tellers, public houses, trams, donkey rides, fish-and-chip shops and theatres

A scenic seaside view of Gorleston Beach Gardens, Norfolk, back in 1890 as staycations may become the norm once again. Gorleston is located at River Yare's mouth and was a port town and then became known for its fishing industry
A packed Gorleston seafront - just a few miles south of the popular seaside resort of Great Yarmouth - in the summer of 2018. Bouncy castles can be seen on the coastal town of Gorleston nowadays

Gorleston Beach Gardens in Norfolk is seen back in 1890 (left) and as hundreds of daytrippers enjoyed bouncy castles on the seafront in 2018 (right). Gorleston is located at the River Yare’s mouth and became known for its fishing industry. Gorleston seafront is just a few miles south of the popular seaside resort of Great Yarmouth

Pictured: Margate in August 2018

Margate Beach is seen packed with holidaymakers in a new colourised image from 1890 (left), as dozens of Britons enjoy the beach on the southeast coast in August 2018

A long-range shot of picturesque town and beach of Capstone, Ilfracombe, in the south west of England during the 19th century. Cliffs surround the small harbour as seen above
Pictured: Capstone, Ilfracombe

The picturesque town and beach of Capstone, Ilfracombe, in the south west of England is seen during the 19th century (left), compared to a modern day shot of the scenic beach. Cliffs surround the small harbour as seen above

People pictured on Weymouth beach, Dorset, southern England in the 19th century. The destination provided the backdrop for sailing events at the 2012 London Olympic Games
Pictured: Weymouth beach, Dorset

People pictured on Weymouth beach, Dorset, southern England in the 19th century (left) as holidaymakers lounge on the sand in deckchairs in July 2012. The destination provided the backdrop for sailing events at the 2012 London Olympic Games

People enjoying tea and donkey rides at Barricane Beach, Woolacombe, North Devon during the 19th century. A secluded spot, located in between Woolacombe and  Mortehoe which attracts surfers
Pictured: Barricane Beach i

People enjoying tea and donkey rides at Barricane Beach, Woolacombe, North Devon during the 19th century seen left, as beachgoers take advantage of the private spot recently (right). A secluded spot, located in between Woolacombe and Mortehoe which attracts surfers

A high shot of a beach and pier in Folkestone, Kent, from 1890. The town, located on the English channel was a key port in the 19th and 20th centuries
Pictured: Folkestone

A high shot of a beach and pier in Folkestone, Kent, from 1890 compared to a recent image of the beach. The town, located on the English channel was a key port in the 19th and 20th centuries

People enjoying the sand and sea at Great Yarmouth, in Norfolk, the east of England, in 1890.  The destination is a famous tourist spot

People enjoying the sand and sea at Great Yarmouth, in Norfolk, the east of England, in 1890.  The destination is a famous tourist spot

A shot looking west of the seaside town of Worthing, West Sussex from 1890. The beach is around 12 miles along the south coast from Brighton - which attracts a huge amount of day-trippers every year

A shot looking west of the seaside town of Worthing, West Sussex from 1890. The beach is around 12 miles along the south coast from Brighton – which attracts a huge amount of day-trippers every year

The cliffs and beach of Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, in the east of England from the 19th century. In its glory days the seaside town was a bastion of the music scene

The cliffs and beach of Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, in the east of England from the 19th century. In its glory days the seaside town was a bastion of the music scene

A 19th century image of the approach to Babbacombe Beach, Torquay, in Devon. A shingle beach on the south-east coast of England in the shape of an arc

A 19th century image of the approach to Babbacombe Beach, Torquay, in Devon. A shingle beach on the south-east coast of England in the shape of an arc

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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