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Company bosses should be taken to court by UK’s human rights watchdog over equal pay, MPs say

Company bosses should be taken to court by UK’s human rights watchdog if they refuse to pay female employees the same salary as males, MPs say

  • MPs call for human rights watchdog to be revamped to an ‘equality police force’
  • They say watchdog should take firms to court if women aren’t paid same as men
  • The Equalities and Human Rights Commission has been criticised for past lapses
  • Influential committee singled out the EHRC for failing to act over BBC equal pay

Britain’s human rights watchdog should wield its ‘unique’ powers and take firms to court if women are not paid the same as men, MPs said yesterday.

It should not fear investigating and fining firms and ordering them to change their ways over discrimination, they said.

An influential committee of MPs called for the Equalities and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to be revamped into an equality police force.

A report by MPs said companies are not afraid of the watchdog, which ‘should significantly increase the volume, transparency and publicity of its enforcement work by making greater use of its unique enforcement powers’ [File photo]

And they severely criticised the quango for past lapses, saying it was ‘deeply concerning’ the EHRC shied away from ‘challenging’ large firms.

They singled the EHRC out for its failure to act against unequal pay at the BBC for 18 months after the first allegations that the Corporation was paying women less than men.

The push for an overhaul follows Boris Johnson’s promises to protect and extend the legal rights of workers.

The Commons women and equalities committee said it is no longer enough to ask employees who say they suffered from prejudice at work to take cases to tribunals or courts by themselves.

A report by MPs said companies are not afraid of the watchdog, which ‘should significantly increase the volume, transparency and publicity of its enforcement work by making greater use of its unique enforcement powers’.

Former Tory Cabinet minister Maria Miller, chairman of the committee, said: ‘Creating a society where people are not treated differently because of the colour of their skin, sex, gender, sexuality or religion is central to British values.’

Britain's human rights watchdog should wield its ¿unique¿ powers and take firms to court if women are not paid the same as men, MPs said yesterday. It should not fear investigating and fining firms and ordering them to change their ways over discrimination, they said [File photo]

Britain’s human rights watchdog should wield its ‘unique’ powers and take firms to court if women are not paid the same as men, MPs said yesterday. It should not fear investigating and fining firms and ordering them to change their ways over discrimination, they said [File photo]

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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