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Controversial celebrity chef Pete Evans backs protest against vaccines and 5G towers

Celebrity chef Pete Evans has thrown his support behind a controversial protest against 5G and mandatory vaccination.

The former MKR judge shared poster for the ‘peaceful protest walk’ to Facebook on Saturday morning.

‘Wish I could join you all today. These are happening around Australia. Please film it for your record,’ he wrote.

Evans signed off his message with the hashtags ‘united we stand’ and ‘I do not consent’. 

Celebrity chef Pete Evans has thrown his support behind a controversial protest against 5G and mandatory vaccination

The former MKR judge shared poster for the 'peaceful protest walk' to Facebook on Saturday morning

The former MKR judge shared poster for the ‘peaceful protest walk’ to Facebook on Saturday morning

Evans was released from his contract at Channel 7 following a spate of controversial and often dangerous statements – mostly relating to coronavirus conspiracy theories. 

Evans, who has also shared misleading information about immunisation, has insisted he is not an ‘anti-vaxxer’ but ‘pro-choice’. 

Vaccinations are a simple, safe and effective way of protecting people against harmful diseases before they come into contact with them, the Australian Government says. 

The jabs protect individuals and others in the community, by reducing the spread of preventable diseases. 

The protest Evans posted about encouraged demonstrators to meet at Hyde Park in Sydney at 12pm on Saturday.

The protesters were told ‘join in’ if they were ‘concerned’ about a list of issues which included the ‘erosion’ of human rights, the government’s COVIDSafe app and media corruption.

The protest Evans posted about encouraged demonstrators to meet at Hyde Park in Sydney at 12pm on Saturday (pictured)

The protest Evans posted about encouraged demonstrators to meet at Hyde Park in Sydney at 12pm on Saturday (pictured)

Evans was released from his contract at Channel 7 following a spate of controversial and often dangerous statements - mostly relating to coronavirus conspiracy theories

Evans was released from his contract at Channel 7 following a spate of controversial and often dangerous statements – mostly relating to coronavirus conspiracy theories 

WHAT ARE THEY PROTESTING ABOUT? 

  • ‘Erosion’ of human and democratic rights
  • Government mobile tracking app
  • Mandatory vaccines 
  • 5G
  • Media corruption
  • Health care/medical options
  • Right to work
  • Economic repercussions of COVID-19 policies
  • ‘Toxic environment’ 

The demonstration was also about the ‘draconian shutdown’ of the country during the coronavirus pandemic. 

The government introduced a range of social distancing measures to successfully control the spread of COVID-19.  

‘Rally decorum. Be calm. The coordinators will lead peaceful chants,’ the protest event description reads. 

‘Wear or pin your signs to your clothing and keep your hands free.’

Video footage from the event showed hundreds of demonstrators gathered in close proximity. 

Video footage from the event showed hundreds of demonstrators gathered in close proximity

Video footage from the event showed hundreds of demonstrators gathered in close proximity

The protest goes against the NSW Government's COVID-19 restrictions which currently allow groups of 10 to gather in public

The protest goes against the NSW Government’s COVID-19 restrictions which currently allow groups of 10 to gather in public

‘Our body, our choice. Australia still has a voice,’ the protesters chanted as they walked slowly through the park.

The vision showed a handful of police officers walk along with the crowd.

A man played his guitar while trudging along and sang ‘I don’t consent, United Nations.’   

The demonstrators also held onto signs, some reading ‘freedom is our birth right’ and ‘my body my choice’. 

The protest goes against the NSW Government’s COVID-19 restrictions which currently allow groups of 10 to gather in public. 

Anti-vaxxers spread false and dangerous theories, such as vaccines cause autism, based on a completely discredited 1998 medical report that saw the author struck from the medical register. 

Evans (pictured with wife Nicola), who has also shared misleading information about immunisation, has insisted he is not an 'anti-vaxxer' but 'pro-choice' (pictured with wife Nicola)

Evans (pictured with wife Nicola), who has also shared misleading information about immunisation, has insisted he is not an ‘anti-vaxxer’ but ‘pro-choice’ (pictured with wife Nicola)

Before vaccination campaigns in the 1960s and 1970s, diseases such as tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough killed thousands of children, whereas today in Australia, dying from one of these is extremely rare. 

Health authorities have warned that not immunising children threatens the public’s ‘herd immunity’ against disease.

‘Immunisation is a safe and effective way to protect you and your children from harmful, contagious diseases. It also safeguards the health of other people, now and for future generations,’ the Australian government’s health department says.

‘Before vaccination campaigns in the 1960s and 1970s, diseases like tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough killed thousands of children. Today, it is extremely rare to die from these diseases in Australia.’ 

WHY VACCINES ARE IMPORTANT

Immunisation is a simple, safe and effective way of protecting people against harmful diseases before they come into contact with them.

Immunisation not only protects individuals, but also others in the community, by reducing the spread of preventable diseases.

Research and testing is an essential part of developing safe and effective vaccines.

In Australia, vaccines must pass strict safety testing before the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) will register them for use. Approval of vaccines can take up to 10 years.

Before vaccines become available to the public, large clinical trials test them on thousands of people.

High-quality studies over many years have compared the health of large numbers of vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Medical information from nearly 1.5 million children around the world have confirmed that vaccination does not cause autism.

People first became concerned about autism and immunisation after the medical journal The Lancet published a paper in 1998. This paper claimed there was a link between the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism. Since then, scientists have completely discredited this paper. The Lancet withdrew it in 2010 and printed an apology. The UK’s General Medical Council struck the author off the medical register for misconduct and dishonesty.

Source: Australian Department of Health 

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