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Copenhagen Zoo puts down 23-year-old white rhino ‘for its own wellbeing’

Copenhagen Zoo puts down 23-year-old white rhino ‘for its own wellbeing’ after it refuses to eat because of a skin disease and loses 880lbs

  • White rhino, called Kurt, was suffering from severe ulcers on his face and mouth
  • Vets said the father-of-three had lost all desire to eat prior to his death today
  • Kurt was born in South Africa in 1996 before moving to Denmark four years later 

A white rhino was killed at Copenhagen Zoo ‘for its own wellbeing’ after losing 880lbs in three weeks.

Kurt, the 23-year-old animal, was thought to have been suffering from a skin condition called superficial nectolytic dermatitis, which primarily attacked the rhino’s face, mouth and nostrils.

Vets at the zoo in Denmark’s capital said severe ulcers meant Kurt had lost all desire to eat prior to his death this morning.

This white rhino was killed at Copenhagen Zoo ‘for its own wellbeing’ after losing 880lbs in three weeks

Mads Bertelsen, a veterinarian at the zoo, said: ‘We have done everything we could to save our rhinoceros, but it is also our job to assess when enough is enough.

‘We have treated him extensively during this period, but the wounds in his mouth meant he had lost the desire to eat. 

‘He was now so weak that we didn’t want to keep him alive any longer out of concern for his own wellbeing.’ 

The cause of the disease has yet to be established and an autopsy will take place today at the Copenhagen University College, in a bid to provide answers. 

Kurt, (pictured) the 23-year-old animal, was thought to have been suffering from a skin condition called superficial nectolytic dermatitis, which primarily attacked the rhino's face, mouth and nostrils

Kurt, (pictured) the 23-year-old animal, was thought to have been suffering from a skin condition called superficial nectolytic dermatitis, which primarily attacked the rhino’s face, mouth and nostrils

Kurt was born in South Africa in 1996 before moving to Denmark four years later.

He first stayed at the Knuthenborg Safari Park on the island of Lolland before moving to Copenhagen Zoo in 2012. 

The father-of-three was due to become a dad to two more calves early next year.

‘In the midst of all the sadness, we can happily rejoice that this male rhino ended a baby-drought of more than 30 years in the rhino stable,’ Mr Bertelsen said.

‘First by becoming the father of a single rhino boy and then two more, who are currently running around the Savannah.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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