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Cops sound warning over highly realistic toy guns that are illegal in all but two states


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The Christmas presents that could get your children ARRESTED: Cops’ warning over highly realistic toy guns that are illegal in all but two states

  • Toy guns are designed to highly resemble their real-world counterparts 
  • Models include fully-automatic rifles, shotguns, and child-friendly alternatives 
  • Retailers said sales of the guns have increased in the lead up to Christmas 
  • Toy guns are legal in SA and QLD but are banned in all other Australian states 

Police have issued a warning about realistic toy guns that are illegal in all but two states – as the sales of the toys skyrocket in the lead up to Christmas.  

The toy guns are designed to resemble their real ones but shoot water-absorbing gel pellets and retailers have seen a surge in sales.

The guns, known as gel blasters, are legal in South Australia and Queensland but are banned in all other states in Australia. 

Though they are legal in two states, pointing and firing a gel blaster at another person without their permission can result in up to seven years in prison.  

The toy guns, known as gel blasters, are designed to resemble their real-world counterpart, shoot water-absorbing gel pellets and retailers have seen a surge in sales 

Townsville police’s Sergeant Julie Cook said while gel blasters were legal in Queensland, there were strict rules regarding transportation,  

‘When possessing the gel blaster in a public place the item must be carried in a way that is not visible to the public,’ she told the ABC.

‘Obviously, we don’t want people carrying them down the street because they look so real.’ 

The penalty for carrying an unconcealed gel blaster in Queensland is up to two years in prison.  

In December 2018, gel blasters were used to shoot at people in a Townsville park. 

Two men were charged with assault occasioning bodily harm and dangerous conduct with a weapon.  

Gel blasters are legal in South Australia and Queensland but are banned in all other states in Australia (pictured: Gel blasters seized by the Australian Border Force)

Gel blasters are legal in South Australia and Queensland but are banned in all other states in Australia (pictured: Gel blasters seized by the Australian Border Force)

Gel blasters are similar to paintball guns, but the gel pellets do not hurt as much as paintball pellets.  

They come in a variety of models including a fully automatic rifle and a pump-action shotgun. 

Several children’s models are also available including a rife which shoots up to 8 rounds per second and has an ACOG scope attached for greater accuracy. 

Pricing for the gel blasters ranges between $55 to over $400 depending on the model and attachments. 

The blasters are used in a similar sport to paintball but provide an alternative for those who don’t want to clean up a mess or do not want to be hurt. 

Though they are legal in two states, pointing and firing a gel blaster at another person without their permission can result in up to seven years in prison

Though they are legal in two states, pointing and firing a gel blaster at another person without their permission can result in up to seven years in prison

Tegan Maynard of One Shot Gel Blasters said the sales have doubled in the lead up to Christmas. 

‘It’s very hyped this year as well – it’s what’s trending and it has been absolutely crazy,’ Ms Maynard said. 

Retailers who sell gel blaster are required to display at least one Queensland Police STOP campaign poster in their store. 

The poster outlines regulations around the ownership and use of gel blasters. 

It also provides information to buyers regarding offences and penalties related to the illegal use of gel blasters.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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