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Coronavirus is most likely to spread between 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, study finds

Coronavirus is most likely to spread between 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, study finds

  • 60% of COVID-19 cases occurred in the temperature range, researchers said
  • They also warned of a second wave in autumn in big cities in middle latitudes
  • A Chinese university released the findings with a COVID-19 prediction platform
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

The novel coronavirus is most likely to spread in places with air temperatures between five and 15 degrees Celsius or 41 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, a study has discovered.

More than half of the COVID-19 cases have occurred in such condition, according to Chinese researchers.

The team also warned of a second outbreak in autumn in big cities in middle latitudes. The region covers most of North America, Europe, Russia, China and part of Australia and South America.

More than half of the COVID-19 cases have occurred in places with air temperatures between five and 15 degrees Celsius, researchers from China’s Lanzhou University have discovered. Pictured, Chinese commuters wear protective masks at an intersection in Beijing on May 18

Lanzhou University in north-western China announced the findings yesterday as it released its COVID-19 pandemic global prediction platform. 

The researchers said they were hoping to better understand the virus’s transmission pattern by learning about the environment in which the killer pathogen could survive more easily.

Their research shows that the ideal temperatures for the virus’s transmission are between five and 15 degrees Celsius or 41 to 59 degrees Fahrenheit.

More than 60 per cent of the confirmed global COVID-19 infections were registered in the temperature range, according to a social media post from the university. 

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua reported. Pictured, people eat lunch behind protective plastic barriers in a cafeteria in Seoul on May 20

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua reported. Pictured, people eat lunch behind protective plastic barriers in a cafeteria in Seoul on May 20

The experts also found that the virus’s transmission rates were linked to an area’s humidity.

Around 73.8 per cent of the diagnosed cases were concentrated in regions with an absolute humidity of three to 10 grams in each cubic meter, said a report of the study from state news agency Xinhua.

The study was carried out based on the data of approximately 3.75million global confirmed COVID-19 cases in 185 countries and regions from January 21 to May 6, Xinhua added.

The coronavirus pandemic emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December before sweeping across the world.

So far, more than 346,000 people have died of the disease, and around 5.5 million have caught the bug worldwide.

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise since January. Pictured, people wear face masks to avoid catching coronavirus as they ride bicycles in the central business district in Beijing on May 26

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise since January. Pictured, people wear face masks to avoid catching coronavirus as they ride bicycles in the central business district in Beijing on May 26

Chinese health authorities registered no new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Saturday, marking the first time it saw no daily rise in the number of native or imported infections since authorities began reporting data in January. 

Seven people were diagnosed with the deadly disease on Monday. All of them were classified as ‘imported cases’, people who bring the virus into China from overseas, said the country’s national health commission today. 

According to official figures, 4,643 people in China have lost their lives in the pandemic and 82,992 have contracted the illness.

More than 80 per cent of the country’s COVID-19 deaths took place in Wuhan, the former epicentre of the pandemic, authorities said.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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