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Coronavirus UK: Death toll hits 12,107 with 813 more deaths

The UK has announced 778 more deaths from the coronavirus today, taking the UK’s total to 12,107 after three weeks of nationwide lockdown. 

NHS England confirmed 744 more patients have died in its hospitals and a total of 34 fatalities were announced across Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. 

Chancellor Rishi Sunak said in the Government’s daily briefing today that 19,706 people are currently in hospital with the coronavirus, down from more than 20,000 yesterday, and that 302,599 people have been tested.

A promising development is the stabilising of the number of people being diagnosed with the virus each day – 5,252 more people were diagnosed in the past 24 hours, taking the total number of positive tests so far to 93,873. This has risen from a week low of 4,342 yesterday but is lower than four of the past six days. 

Professor Stephen Powis, the national medical director of NHS England, added in the briefing that ‘there’s increasing evidence now that the number of hospital admissions is stabilising and plateauing’ and said this was proof the effects of social distancing were ‘manifesting’ in statistics coming out of hospitals.

The increase from 717 deaths recorded yesterday is small – 8.5 per cent – but it comes at the end of a four-day bank holiday weekend, meaning deaths that happened after Wednesday last week may be underreported because of a data lag which appears to happen every weekend. 

Government scientists have cautioned against pinning too much hope to the numbers of people dying because they date back up to two weeks and do not represent the situation on the day they’re published.

By the end of March coronavirus had become a contributing factor in one in every five deaths in England (21.2 per cent), according to separate data published today, and more people died in the first week of April than in any other week of the past 15 years. 

Today’s statistics come amid a row over care homes’ role in the ongoing crisis. Elderly people account for the vast majority of COVID-19 deaths but authorities are not routinely testing the 400,000 Britons who live in care homes and records only publish homes’ death statistics in once-weekly updates which are 10 days out of date.

And a shocking analysis from the Office for Budget Responsibility, an arms-length government organisation, has warned Britain’s economy could shrink by a third as a result of the coronavirus and, if the lockdown lasts for another two months, 10 per cent of the workforce (two million people) could end up unemployed.

Mr Sunak said in today’s briefing that the analysis was not a forecast or a prediction, but a possible scenario. He said the UK entered the coronavirus crisis with a ‘fundamentally sound’ economy, the Government would ‘not stand by and let this happen’ and that the best way to protect the economy was to ‘protect our people’.

In other coronavirus news:

  • A total of 406 deaths involving Covid-19 in England and Wales registered up to April 3 occurred outside of hospitals, according to provisional figures from the Office for National Statistics; 
  • Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon hit out at reports medical protective equipment has been diverted from Scottish care homes to English ones, saying she ‘will not stand by and be treated unfairly’; 
  • Teachers are ‘disturbed’ by ‘unhelpful’ speculation that schools and colleges will reopen soon amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the largest education union in Europe; 
  • 10 Downing Street’s chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, has returned to work after going into self-isolation when Mr Johnson tested positive for the coronavirus; 
  • Boris Johnson is not taking any phone calls or receiving official papers as he recuperates from coronavirus at Chequers in Buckinghamshire, his spokesperson said; 
  • Government advisers criticised the ‘all or nothing’ approach to lockdown and said there is no evidence that sunbathing presents a transmission risk;
  • It was revealed the UK has missed three chances to participate in an EU scheme to buy huge quantities of personal protective equipment (PPE) for NHS staff;
  • Europe took its first tentative steps towards a return to normality as some countries including Austria, Italy and Spain start to re-open businesses.

NHS England today said its newest update meant 11,005 people in England have now died after testing positive for COVID-19.

The 744 patients were aged between 34 and 102 and 58 of them were otherwise healthy, the youngest of whom was 38 and the oldest 96.

After a lapse behind the Midlands yesterday, London has returned to its position as the centre of the UK’s outbreak, accounting for 206 of the deaths announced today.

Meanwhile 143 more people have died in the North West, 109 in the Midlands, 95 in the East of England, 93 in the North East & Yorkshire, 73 in the South East and 25 in the South West. 

A further 206 coronavirus deaths were recorded in London today, taking the capital's total to more than 3,000 people. Pictured, paramedics work in protective clothing at a hospital in the city

A further 206 coronavirus deaths were recorded in London today, taking the capital’s total to more than 3,000 people. Pictured, paramedics work in protective clothing at a hospital in the city

The Department of Health has officially recorded 34 more deaths for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, but the devolved nations independently recorded more.

Scotland said 40 more people have died there, Wales 19 and Northern Ireland 10 – a total of 69 – meaning the true number for Britain is at least 12,142.

Because the four governments record their data at different times these statistics do not line up – some of those that happen outside of England will be recorded by Whitehall tomorrow instead.

Today’s update comes as a different set of data published this morning, by the Office for National Statistics, an independent governmental statistics department, revealed the true COVID-19 death toll may be 15 per cent higher than the Department of Health’s daily announcements let on.  

The ONS found that, by April 3, the NHS in England had recorded 5,186 COVID-19 deaths but a count of death certificates on which the disease was mentioned put the true figure at 5,979 – a rise of 793 (15.3 per cent). 

WHERE ARE PEOPLE DYING WITH COVID-19 IN ENGLAND? 

Every region in England has recorded hundreds of fatalities. The South West is the only corner of the country where fewer than 1,000 people have died after contracting the illness.

Deaths by region:

  1. London: 3,071
  2. Midlands: 2,289
  3. North West: 1,450
  4. North East & Yorkshire: 1,355
  5. South East: 1,159
  6. East of England: 1,156
  7. South West: 525 

At least 182 hospitals, both NHS and private, have recorded deaths of patients who had tested positive for the coronavirus. Those in London and Birmingham have consistently been the worst affected. 

Hospitals recording the most deaths: 

  1. University Hospitals Birmingham: 460
  2. Royal Free London: 328
  3. London North West University Healthcare: 299
  4. King’s College Hospital, London: 270
  5. Bart’s Health NHS Trust, London: 246 
  6. Imperial College Healthcare, London: 224
  7. Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals: 204
  8. Frimley Health Trust, Surrey: 184
  9. Croydon Health Services, London: 181

Source: NHS England 

Those 793 people were those who died in care homes, hospices and their own houses and are now being referred to as the crisis’s hidden victims. 

If this same proportion is scaled up to Britain’s current death toll – 12,107 – it could mean there are at least 1,816 people who have already died at home and not been counted. 

Nick Stripe, head of health analysis at the ONS said: ‘The latest comparable data for deaths involving COVID-19 with a date of death up to 3 April, show there were 6,235 deaths in England and Wales. 

‘When looking at data for England, this is 15 per cent higher than the NHS numbers as they include all mentions of COVID-19 on the death certificate, including suspected COVID-19, as well as deaths in the community.’

The disparity in death tolls has drawn attention to the escalating crisis being faced by nursing homes across the UK, which say they are not being included in the Government’s response despite elderly people being the most at risk of dying if they catch the coronavirus. 

Over-80s account for 52 per cent of all the coronavirus deaths in England’s hospitals so far (5,669 out of 11,005) while 92 per cent of everyone who has died has been 60 or older (10,075 people). 

Despite this and the fact that there are more than 400,000 people living in nursing homes, according to Labour’s Shadow Minister for Social Care, Liz Kendall, routine testing is not carried out at the facilities. 

Close quarters in the homes, physical contact with nursing staff and the likelihood of residents having other health problems make them potential havens for COVID-19 to spread.

Calling for better tracking of the coronavirus in care homes, Ms Kendall said today: ‘We urgently need these figures on a daily basis to help deal with the emerging crisis in social care and ensure everything possible is being done to protect more than 400,000 elderly and disabled people who live in nursing and residential care homes.

‘The Government has rightly said the NHS will get whatever resources it needs to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. This must also apply to social care, which needs a much greater priority and focus than it has had so far.’

COVID-19 is now a factor in more than one in five deaths in England and Wales and the virus outbreak means the countries set a 15-year record for the most amount of deaths in a single week when more than 16,000 people died between March 28 and April 3 (Office for National Statistics data)

COVID-19 is now a factor in more than one in five deaths in England and Wales and the virus outbreak means the countries set a 15-year record for the most amount of deaths in a single week when more than 16,000 people died between March 28 and April 3 (Office for National Statistics data)

Deaths linked to coronavirus accounted for 46 per cent of all deaths recorded in London between March 28 and April 3

Deaths linked to coronavirus accounted for 46 per cent of all deaths recorded in London between March 28 and April 3

Care home bosses themselves have come forward to declare coronavirus outbreaks in their homes and just two companies that operate in the UK say they have more than 500 deaths between them – more than double the officially-recorded 217 to date.

Sir David Behan, non-executive chairman of HC-One, the UK’s biggest provider, revealed 311 residents and one member of staff have died in its homes as a result of suspected COVID-19 and it has had more than 2,400 infections.

He told Radio 4 this morning: ‘This terrible virus does target older people and people with underlying conditions.

‘What that means is some of the frailest elderly people we’ve got in our society are in care homes and therefore those people are at increased risk.’

Sir David said it was ‘realistic’ to assume that two thirds of all care homes in the country had coronavirus outbreaks and that the death tolls they were seeing were significantly higher than the numbers in the public domain. 

The UK is now entering its fourth week of lockdown after Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave his pivotal ‘stay at home’ speech from Downing Street on March 23 before he fell ill.

All but essential businesses remain closed, the majority of people are working from home or furloughed, and trips out of the home remain limited to one a day for exercise or essential shopping or medical appointments.

The Government and its Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) will review the progress of the lockdown later this week but it is not expected to make any changes.

Instead, the current situation is expected to last into May and potentially beyond, with measures being lifted gradually rather than an end date being set. 

Britain’s economy, however, will face dire consequences of the enforced social distancing.

The Government’s watchdog, the Office for Budget Responsibility, today warned the economy could shrink by more than a third this quarter alone with two million people made jobless if the lockdown continues for two more months.

‘TWO THIRDS OF CARE HOMES COULD HAVE COVID-19 OUTBREAKS’ 

The chief of one of the UK’s largest care home operators has said the scale of the disease’s spread in residential facilities has been grossly underestimated.

Sir David Behan, non-executive chairman of HC-One, which cares for 17,000 people in 328 homes around Britain, said that the company had recorded 2,407 COVID-19 cases across its sites.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that suspected or confirmed coronavirus had been recorded in 232 of the company’s 330 homes. 

And he said that proportion – around two thirds – was a ‘realistic picture’ of how he expected homes around the country to be affected. 

Speaking on Radio 4 this morning, Sir David – a former chair of the Care Quality Commission (CQC) – said: ‘This terrible virus does target older people and people with underlying conditions.

‘What that means is some of the frailest elderly people we’ve got in our society are in care homes and therefore those people are at increased risk.’ 

He added: ‘COVID-19 deaths are representative of just about a third of all deaths we’ve had over the last three weeks.’

Shocking analysis from the OBR underlines the trade-offs being made to combat the deadly disease by putting the country into lockdown.

It warns curbs staying in place for three months will slash GDP by 35 per cent, with unemployment soaring to 10 per cent and the government’s deficit hitting £273billion – the highest level since the Second World War.

The watchdog ominously said it was assumed ‘for now’ there will not be any permanent economic damage, and much of the crash will be unwound as pent-up demand is unleashed when the lockdown finally ends. However, the resulting 13 per cent year-on-year drop will still be worse than anything in the last century.

Responding to the chilling scenario – which emerged as the International Monetary Fund (IMF) predicted the worst global downturn since the Great Depression in 1929 – Chancellor Rishi Sunak said: ‘People should know there is hardship ahead.’

The apocalyptic figures emerged after Dominic Raab moved to quash the idea of an imminent loosening, with the UK now facing restrictions until at least May 7.

But there is growing alarm about the potential death toll from economic misery, with life expectancy set to take a major hit. Doctors have also warned that suspending all non-urgent NHS operations to focus on coronavirus cases means more cancer and heart disease patients will die.

The Cabinet is divided over whether to push to ease the lockdown soon, with some saying the public is obeying social distancing too well and that people must be urged to keep working where possible.

But concerns have been raised that it is impossible to lift the curbs at the moment anyway because the public is so strongly in favour of them staying in place, and would simply refuse to go back to normal.

To underline the sense of drift, a full Cabinet meeting scheduled for today was cancelled for the second week running as Boris Johnson recuperates from COVID-19 at Chequers.

Responding to the OBR figures, Mr Sunak said it was ‘clear this will have a very significant impact on our economy’ adding it is ‘important that we’re honest about that’.

‘People should know that there’s hardship ahead. We won’t be able to protect every job or every business as I’ve said,’ Mr Sunak warned.

‘It’s clear we must defeat this virus as quickly as possible. That’s not a choice between health and economics, that defies common sense. What we need is just to follow the rules and I’m grateful to everyone for doing that over the Easter weekend.’ 

As the UK faces the prospect of further weeks or even months confined to their own homes, other countries across Europe, beginning to emerge from the worst of their epidemics, are start to return to normal life. 

Many regions of Italy today started opening a handful of stores including bookshops and stationery shops in a trial to see how social distancing measures can work after the lockdown, which otherwise remains in force. 

And in Austria, which was the first European country to announce specific plans for ending the lockdown, shoppers were queuing outside hardware stores wearing compulsory masks as small shops re-opened today.

Experts are not expecting a surge in customers, because some people will still be too worried to make unnecessary shopping trips and certain stores may choose to stay closed.

Meanwhile, industrial and construction work is resuming in Spain where some workers were back at their jobs yesterday while other regions are returning today after an Easter Monday holiday.

Some commuters in Spain said they felt reassured by the 10million masks which authorities are handing out this week.

Elsewhere, Denmark is lining up a quicker-than-expected end to the lockdown after hospital cases continued to fall while Iceland says it will start easing restrictions next month.

WHICH HOSPITALS IN ENGLAND ARE RECORDING THE MOST DEATHS LINKED TO THE CORONAVIRUS?  (NHS England data)
NHS TRUST DEATHS NHS TRUST DEATHS
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BIRMINGHAM NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 460 UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BRISTOL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 45
ROYAL FREE LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 328 GREAT WESTERN HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 44
LONDON NORTH WEST UNIVERSITY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 299 WESTERN SUSSEX HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 42
KING’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 270 THE QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL, KING’S LYNN, NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 41
BARTS HEALTH NHS TRUST 246 AIREDALE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 40
IMPERIAL COLLEGE HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 224 ROYAL UNITED HOSPITALS BATH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 40
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF DERBY AND BURTON 215 GEORGE ELIOT HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 39
SANDWELL AND WEST BIRMINGHAM HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 204 ROYAL CORNWALL HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 39
FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 184 JAMES PAGET UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 38
CROYDON HEALTH SERVICES NHS TRUST 181 CHESTERFIELD ROYAL HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 38
LEWISHAM AND GREENWICH NHS TRUST 181 DONCASTER AND BASSETLAW TEACHING HOSPITALS 37
LIVERPOOL UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 176 EAST SUSSEX HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 37
ST GEORGE’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 174 ROYAL BERKSHIRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 37
THE ROYAL WOLVERHAMPTON NHS TRUST 168 ROYAL SURREY COUNTY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 37
EPSOM AND ST HELIER UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 163 WARRINGTON AND HALTON TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 36
NORTH MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 161 UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS PLYMOUTH NHS TRUST 34
SOUTH TYNESIDE AND SUNDERLAND NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 159 NORTH TEES AND HARTLEPOOL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 33
THE DUDLEY GROUP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 145 THE ROYAL BOURNEMOUTH AND CHRISTCHURCH HOSPITALS 33
BARKING, HAVERING AND REDBRIDGE UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS 135 CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 32
MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 135 THE ROTHERHAM NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 32
BASILDON AND THURROCK UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS 131 HULL UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 30
PORTSMOUTH HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 123 BUCKINGHAMSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 27
EAST SUFFOLK AND NORTH ESSEX NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 121 HARROGATE AND DISTRICT NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 25
CHELSEA AND WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 120 EAST CHESHIRE NHS TRUST 25
THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 118 SALISBURY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 25
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF LEICESTER NHS TRUST 115 NORTHERN LINCOLNSHIRE AND GOOLE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 24
NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 112 POOLE HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 24
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS COVENTRY AND WARWICKSHIRE 112 ROYAL DEVON AND EXETER NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 20
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF MORECAMBE BAY 110 TORBAY AND SOUTH DEVON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 20
THE HILLINGDON HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 109 MEDWAY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 19
WEST HERTFORDSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 108 DORSET COUNTY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 18
PENNINE ACUTE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 108 WEST SUFFOLK NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 16
SHEFFIELD TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 107 WYE VALLEY NHS TRUST 16
SURREY AND SUSSEX HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 106 ROYAL BROMPTON & HAREFIELD NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 15
WORCESTERSHIRE ACUTE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 103 TAUNTON AND SOMERSET NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 14
SOUTH TEES HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 100 BIRMINGHAM COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 11
WIRRAL UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL 100 ISLE OF WIGHT NHS TRUST 11
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON HOSPITALS 99 EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 9
WALSALL HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 98 KENT COMMUNITY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 9
SOUTHEND UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 97 ESSEX PARTNERSHIP UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 8
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF NORTH MIDLANDS NHS TRUST 95 YEOVIL DISTRICT HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 7
GUY’S AND ST THOMAS’ NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 93 ROYAL PAPWORTH HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
SALFORD ROYAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 93 WORCESTERSHIRE HEALTH AND CARE NHS TRUST 6
MID YORKSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 92 SOUTHERN HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
EAST KENT HOSPITALS UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 92 SUSSEX COMMUNITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
GLOUCESTERSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 92 GLOUCESTERSHIRE HEALTH AND CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
COUNTY DURHAM AND DARLINGTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 89 ANGLIAN COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE CIC – FRYATT HOSPITAL 5
LEEDS TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 88 CENTRAL AND NORTH WEST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
HOMERTON UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 85 THE ROYAL MARSDEN NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
MID ESSEX HOSPITAL SERVICES NHS TRUST 79 NOTTINGHAMSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
KINGSTON HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 78 TEES, ESK AND WEAR VALLEYS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
NORTHUMBRIA HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 78 THE CHRISTIE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
BOLTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 77 OXFORD HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
CALDERDALE AND HUDDERSFIELD NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 76 HCA UK – WELLINGTON HOSPITAL NORTH BUILDING 4
LUTON AND DUNSTABLE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 74 NORTH EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
NORTH CUMBRIA INTEGRATED CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 74 ROYAL HOSPITAL FOR NEURO-DISABILITY  4
EAST AND NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE NHS TRUST 72 DERBYSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL SOUTHAMPTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 71 LIVERPOOL HEART AND CHEST HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
OXFORD UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 70 THE WALTON CENTRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
WHITTINGTON HEALTH NHS TRUST 69 BERKSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
HAMPSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 68 DORSET HEALTHCARE UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ST HELENS AND KNOWSLEY TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 65 NORTHERN DEVON HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 4
SHERWOOD FOREST HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 64 NORFOLK COMMUNITY HEALTH AND CARE NHS TRUST 3
NORTHAMPTON GENERAL HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 63 CHESHIRE AND WIRRAL PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 3
UNITED LINCOLNSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 62 CORNWALL PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 3
STOCKPORT NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 61 WESTON AREA HEALTH NHS TRUST 3
MID CHESHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 60 HERTFORDSHIRE COMMUNITY NHS TRUST 2
BLACKPOOL TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 59 HERTFORDSHIRE PARTNERSHIP UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
COUNTESS OF CHESTER HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 59 CENTRAL LONDON COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 2
EAST LANCASHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 59 HCA UK – THE PRINCESS GRACE  2
BRADFORD TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 58 SOUTH LONDON AND MAUDSLEY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
TAMESIDE AND GLOSSOP INTEGRATED CARE 57 THE ROBERT JONES AND AGNES HUNT ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL 2
GATESHEAD HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 56 THE ROYAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
WRIGHTINGTON, WIGAN AND LEIGH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 56 CUMBRIA, NORTHUMBERLAND, TYNE AND WEAR NHS TRUST 2
ASHFORD AND ST PETER’S HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 56 SHEFFIELD HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE NHS TRUST  2
MILTON KEYNES UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 53 SOMERSET PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
SOUTHPORT AND ORMSKIRK HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 53 CAMBRIDGESHIRE AND PETERBOROUGH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
BEDFORD HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 52 EAST COAST COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE – BECCLES HOSPITAL 1
THE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 52 HCA UK – THE LISTER 1
BRIGHTON AND SUSSEX UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 51 OXLEAS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
KETTERING GENERAL HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 50 SOUTH WEST LONDON AND ST GEORGE’S MENTAL HEALTH NHS TRUST 1
SHREWSBURY AND TELFORD HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 50 WEST LONDON NHS TRUST 1
MAIDSTONE AND TUNBRIDGE WELLS NHS TRUST 50 DERBYSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
NORTH WEST ANGLIA NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 48 LEICESTERSHIRE PARTNERSHIP NHS TRUST 1
YORK TEACHING HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 48 NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE COMBINED HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 1
NORTH BRISTOL NHS TRUST 48 NORTHAMPTONSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
NORFOLK AND NORWICH UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS 47 BRADFORD DISTRICT CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
DARTFORD AND GRAVESHAM NHS TRUST 47 HUMBER TEACHING NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
SOUTH WARWICKSHIRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 46 ROTHERHAM DONCASTER AND SOUTH HUMBER NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
BARNSLEY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 45 KENT AND MEDWAY NHS AND SOCIAL CARE PARTNERSHIP TRUST 1
LANCASHIRE TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 45 ANGLIAN COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE CIC – CLACTON HOSPITAL 1

UK’s coronavirus death toll could be 50% HIGHER than official figures show (and the week ending April 3 was Britain’s DEADLIEST since records began in 2005) 

The true scale of Britain’s devastating coronavirus crisis was today laid bare by data suggesting there are potentially thousands of hidden victims. 

Figures from the Office for National Statistics show the true number of people who have died of COVID-19 could be 52 per cent higher than official figures.

Daily updates from the Department of Health may only account for between 45 and 65 per cent of the total number of deaths for any given day when hospital fatalities have been backdated, statistics have started to show.

For April 3, for example, 3,939 deaths had been recorded by the DH but the ONS now knows there to have been at least 5,979 – an increase of 51.7 per cent. 

The ONS’ death toll is also 15 per cent higher than the number given by NHS England, which only takes into account hospital deaths and not ones that have happened elsewhere, such as in care homes. 

The discrepancy – which is caused by backdated hospital deaths and those recorded outside of hospitals – is why Government scientists say people should not use the daily death figures as a yardstick for Britain’s progress through the outbreak.

ONS statistics also show that there is a gap of around 15 per cent between deaths in hospitals and the country’s total when people who die at home or in care homes are included.    

While hospitals in England recorded 5,186 coronavirus deaths up to April 3, a count of death certificates put the true figure at 5,979.

This marked a rise of 793 which, if applied to the UK-wide official death toll of 11,329, could mean an extra 1,699 people have died but not yet been counted. These are people who died in care homes, hospices or their own houses.

Officials face mounting pressure to get on top of recording deaths in care homes, which insiders say are considerably more common than is being portrayed.   

The statistics come as the ONS revealed more people died in the week between March 28 and April 3 than in another week of the past 15 years. 

There were 16,387 fatalities recorded across the seven days, up more than 5,000 on the week before and 6,000 more than the average for that week. 

Official data showed the week ending April 3 was the deadliest since records began in 2005, with 16,387 fatalities recorded. A graph shows how the week compares to others since the start of 2020

Official data showed the week ending April 3 was the deadliest since records began in 2005, with 16,387 fatalities recorded. A graph shows how the week compares to others since the start of 2020

ONE IN FIVE DEATHS IN ENGLAND AND WALES ARE LINKED TO COVID-19 

More than one in five deaths recorded in England and Wales are now linked to coronavirus, new figures show. 

Data from the ONS shows COVID-19 was mentioned on 3,475 death certificates in the week ending April 3, including hospital, care home and community deaths.  

The total number of deaths recorded in Week 14 – as it is officially known – was 16,387. 

This means coronavirus has pushed the death toll in England and Wales to its highest level since official weekly figures began in 2005.  

Nick Stripe, head of health analysis and life events at the ONS said: ‘The latest comparable data for deaths involving COVID-19 with a date of death up to 3 April, show there were 6,235 deaths in England and Wales. 

‘When looking at data for England, this is 15 per cent higher than the NHS numbers as they include all mentions of COVID-19 on the death certificate, including suspected COVID-19, as well as deaths in the community.

‘The 16,387 deaths that were registered in England and Wales during the week ending 3 April is the highest weekly total since we started compiling weekly deaths data in 2005.’    

Coronavirus is now linked to more than one in five deaths per week, according to the data for the last week of March. In London, the virus was mentioned on the death certificates of almost half of fatalities.

Some 21.2 per cent of all fatalities were linked to the disease, which causes pneumonia and multiple organ failure.  

Data from the ONS shows COVID-19 was mentioned on 3,475 death certificates in the week ending April 3, including hospital, care home and community deaths.

The total number of deaths recorded in Week 14 – as it is officially known – was 16,387.

Coronavirus is now linked to more than one in five deaths per week, according to the data for the last week of March. In London, the virus was mentioned on the death certificates of almost half of fatalities

Coronavirus is now linked to more than one in five deaths per week, according to the data for the last week of March. In London, the virus was mentioned on the death certificates of almost half of fatalities

More men are dying of coronavirus in every age bracket in England and Wales, official figures collated by the ONS show

ONS data showed deaths in care homes made up 10 per cent of Britain's fatality toll

ONS data showed deaths in care homes made up 10 per cent of Britain’s fatality toll

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT FIGURES THE ONS RELEASED TODAY? 

The ONS released a series of startling figures today which laid bare the true scale of England’s coronavirus crisis.

It broke down the deaths recorded from all across the country, not just the hospitals – which are the figures collated by NHS England.

ONS data showed there had been 3,950 deaths registered across England by April 3, since the first fatality was officially announced on March 5.

But this number jumped to 5,979 when accounting for a recording delay, including all deaths up to April 3 that were registered by April 11. 

In contrast, that is 15 per cent higher than the figure given by NHS England (5,186) – which tallies up the number of actual hospital deaths for each day. 

The ONS figures suggested there is an extra 793 deaths which mentioned COVID-19 that weren’t recorded by health officials.

This is because the ONS count applies to deaths in any location, such as care homes and hospices. 

It was also a massive 52 per cent higher than the 3,939 deaths in England that were announced up to April 3 by the Department of Health.

This is because Government figures – also based on hospital deaths – are backdated (unlike the NHS) and do not relate to the day on which they’re released.  

The ONS also releases a separate set of figures, which breakdown exactly where the deaths occurred in any given week.

The data does, however, not include the full-set of figures. It only goes off the days of registrations – and not occurrences.

It showed 195 of the 3,475 COVID-19 fatalities recorded in England and Wales during week 14 were in care homes – the equivalent of 5.6 per cent.

Another 170 deaths were declared outside of hospitals, including in hospices or their own homes. 

ONS statisticians then crunched dating back three weeks, to when the first COVID-19 deaths were confirmed in care homes.

It showed that 90.2 per cent of all COVID-19 deaths recorded up to April 3 had been in hospitals (3,716).

The other 406 were in care homes (217 – 5.3 per cent), at home (136 – 3.3 per cent) and in a hospice (33 – 0.8 per cent). 

This means coronavirus has pushed the death toll in England and Wales to its highest level since official weekly figures began in 2005.  

Professor Tom Dening, of the University of Nottingham, said: ‘It is worrying that there appears to be a sharp increase in deaths in the community that are not known to be due to COVID-19. 

‘So far, we don’t have good data on the possible reasons for this but there are a number of possibilities. 

‘The first is simply that many of these are in fact caused by Covid-19 that wasn’t diagnosed. Testing remains extremely limited outside of hospitals so we probably won’t ever know how many people had the virus during this period.

‘There are probably multiple reasons for other deaths. These include people not feeling able to attend their GP surgeries, call an ambulance or attend A&E as they may have done in the past. 

‘Therefore, some serious conditions may present too late for effective treatment. Concern has been expressed by doctors working in children’s emergency care that they are not currently seeing the usual range of childhood emergencies.

‘Another possibility is that some people with serious conditions, like cancer or chronic kidney disease, are either unable or unwilling to attend hospital on the usual regular basis, so their treatment regimes may lapse.’ 

He added: ‘Finally, there is already much known about the psychological effects of quarantine, especially when this is prolonged beyond a couple of weeks. 

‘Most of the mental health consequences will have a longer timescale and probably haven’t contributed to the excess mortality currently being seen.  

‘It is quite possible we will see an increase in suicides and self-harm over time, the longer the lockdown goes on. People with existing serious mental health issues may find the current circumstances particularly difficult, as they may have limited social networks or difficulty in accessing their usual sources of support.’ 

The Government is now under mounting pressure to start recording all COVID-19 deaths on a day-by-day basis after a row broke out over how care homes are involved in the crisis.

The care home regulator, the Care Quality Commission, today said it was stepping in to collect daily numbers of coronavirus deaths. 

Currently the only data on care home deaths is released on a weekly basis – and is two weeks behind the date on which it comes out.

The ONS statistics, released once a week on a Tuesday, are the only insight the public gets into how many people are dying behind care homes’ closed doors.

Bosses at two of the country’s largest care home providers – HC-One and MHA -said they have unofficially recorded at least 521 COVID-19 deaths among their residents already.

The true number is likely to be considerably higher because there are around 400,000 people living in residential care facilities around the UK.

The Labour Party’s Shadow Minister for Social Care, Liz Kendall, said it is vital that more is done to protect care home residents and workers, and to offer the public a clear picture of what is happening behind their closed doors.  

‘The increase in COVID-19 deaths in care homes is extremely worrying,’ she said. 

‘But the true picture will sadly be even worse because these figures are only up to the week ending April 3.

‘We urgently need these figures on a daily basis to help deal with the emerging crisis in social care and ensure everything possible is being done to protect more than 400,000 elderly and disabled people who live in nursing and residential care homes.

‘The Government has rightly said the NHS will get whatever resources it needs to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

‘This must also apply to social care, which needs a much greater priority and focus than it has had so far.’

Ms Kendall called on the Government to set out how it would improve the situation in today’s Downing Street briefing.

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