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Cosby confined to his home as team decries his case a ‘public lynching’

Bill Cosby’s team has blasted his sexual-assault trial as a ‘public lynching’ on Friday just as the 80-year-old was ordered to wear a GPS monitor while under house arrest as he awaits sentencing. 

Cosby’s publicists Ebonee Benson and Andrew Wyatt defended the defamed comedian just one day after he was found guilty on three counts of sexual assault. 

The spokespeople appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America on Friday where they likened Cosby’s trial to the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till, the black teenager who was killed after being wrongly accused of whistling at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store. 

They added that they have began looking ahead to an appeal as Cosby is set to undergo a violent sexual predator’s assessment and only allowed to leave his Pennsylvania mansion for medical treatment or to meet his lawyers.

  

Emmett Till was killed after being accused of whistling at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store

Bill Cosby’s team likened his sexual assault trial to the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till (right), who was killed after being accused of whistling at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store

The disgraced comedian was ordered on Friday to stay under house arrest at his Pennsylvania mansion (pictured) until sentencing

The disgraced comedian was ordered on Friday to stay under house arrest at his Pennsylvania mansion (pictured) until sentencing

Cosby's publicists Ebonee Benson (left)  and Andrew Wyatt (right) defended their client on Friday calling his trial a 'public lynching' akin to the Emmett Till case 

Cosby’s publicists Ebonee Benson (left)  and Andrew Wyatt (right) defended their client on Friday calling his trial a ‘public lynching’ akin to the Emmett Till case 

 The man once beloved as ‘America’s Dad’ faces a sentence of up to 30 years for drugging and molesting Andrea Constand at his Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.   

Constand took to Twitter to thank prosecutors in her first comment on the verdict.

‘Truth prevails,’ she wrote.

However, Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt said: ‘He maintains his innocence, and he is going to walk around as a man who’s innocent because he didn’t do anything wrong.

Host George Stephanopoulos asked if the spokespeople really believe all 60 of Cosby’s accusers are lying.

‘Since when are all women honest? We can take a look at Emmett Till, for example,’ Benson said.  

Wyatt then called Cosby’s trial ‘a public lynching.’

Judge Steven O’Neill signed the house arrest order on Friday, clarifying the terms of the disgraced icon’s $1 million bail, one day after a Pennsylvania jury found Cosby guilty on three counts of sexual assault.

The conviction triggered more fallout for Cosby, whose career and reputation were already wrecked by a barrage of accusations from more than 60 women who said he drugged and molested them over a span of 50 years.

Temple University, the Philadelphia school that counted Cosby as its most famous alum, revoked his honorary degree.

Cosby’s spokespeople said they have begun looking toward appealing the ruling. 

The women’s testimony introduced a ‘huge amount of prejudice and bias,’ according to Benson.

The defense is likely to focus its appeal on the judge’s decision to allow five additional accusers to testify.

Defense allegations of a biased juror and the admission of Cosby’s explosive testimony about drugs and sex are among other possible avenues of appeal as he tries to avoid a sentence that could keep him in prison for the rest of his life.

That ruling was a victory for prosecutors eager to move the case beyond a he-said, she-said.

One of those women called Cosby a ‘serial rapist.’ Another choked back tears as she asked, ‘You remember, don’t you, Mr. Cosby?’ A third declared: ‘I was raped.’

Lawyers not connected with the case said the defense has a strong argument.

Cosby’s appeal seems certain to focus on the judge’s decision to let a parade of women testify that they, too, were abused by the former TV star.

Bill Cosby accuser Andrea Constand smiles as she listens during a news conference after Cosby was found guilty in his sexual assault retrial on Thursday 

Bill Cosby accuser Andrea Constand smiles as she listens during a news conference after Cosby was found guilty in his sexual assault retrial on Thursday 

Bill Cosby is pictured leaving the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa after being convicted of drugging and molesting a woman on Thursday

Bill Cosby is pictured leaving the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa after being convicted of drugging and molesting a woman on Thursday

‘I think that his lawyers have a very real chance at overturning the verdict,’ said Christopher Adams, a defense attorney whose clients have included former NBA star Jayson Williams.

He said the judge’s decision to allow the ‘prior bad acts’ testimony could have tainted the jury.

‘It’s one thing if they looked at one or two, but five? He wasn’t charged with being a serial assaulter,’ Adams said.

Former federal prosecutor David Axelrod, now in private practice in Philadelphia, also said Cosby’s team has a shot at convincing an appeals court that the judge went too far.

Generally, testimony about a defendant’s past misconduct is admissible only under certain circumstances – for example, if it shows motive or intent.

Only one other accuser was permitted to testify at Cosby’s first trial, which ended in a hung jury last year.

The Cosby camp also complained about a juror who allegedly said before the trial that he thought the comedian was guilty. Cosby’s lawyers tried unsuccessfully to have the man removed.

The defense is also expected to raise on appeal O’Neill’s ruling that allowed jurors to hear portions of a deposition Cosby gave over a decade ago as part of Constand’s lawsuit against him. In the deposition, the TV star acknowledged obtaining quaaludes in the 1970s to give to women he wanted to have sex with.

The three counts of aggravated indecent assault carry up to 10 years in prison each, but the charges are likely to be merged into one for sentencing purposes.

Accuser Lili Bernard is consoled by grief counselor Caroline Heldman left, as accuser Victoria Valentino, right, is comforted outside the courtroom after Bill Cosby was found guilty in his sexual assault retrial, Thursday, April, 26, 2018, at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa. After decades of whispers, lawsuits, investigations and close calls - and a multitude of women who lost hope anyone would ever believe their word against that of America's Dad - Cosby could be headed to prison at age 80 for the remainder of his life. (Mark Makela/Pool Photo via AP, Pool)

Bill Cosby’s accusers are pictured emotion after he was found guilty on three counts of sexual assault



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