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Country festival Deni Ute Muster wraps up its 20th year

It has been coined as the country’s bogan Burning Man, but this year’s Deni Ute Muster left true-blue Australians revved up for more action as the festival packs-up after another year of debauchery. 

Over the course of 20 years, the salt-of-the-earth festival in Deniliquin – which is playfully known as ‘Deni’ – has blossomed in to an event celebrating country lifestyle.

The annual New South Wales event was created to bring in tourism to the drought-affected town in the Riverina region.

Over the course of 20 years, the salt-of-the-earth festival in Deniliquin – which is playfully known as ‘Deni’ – has blossomed in to an event celebrating country lifestyle

Festival-goers descended on the dusty plains in the southern NSW town for the two-day event on Friday

Festival-goers descended on the dusty plains in the southern NSW town for the two-day event on Friday

The Deni Ute Muster has long been associated with country town tropes such as lawn-mowing races, butchery, wood chopping, as well as whip-cracking and driving competitions

The Deni Ute Muster has long been associated with country town tropes such as lawn-mowing races, butchery, wood chopping, as well as whip-cracking and driving competitions

The Deni Ute Muster has long been associated with country town tropes such as lawn-mowing races, butchery, wood chopping, as well as whip-cracking and driving competitions. 

As it leaps in to the second decade, the main focus of the festival is not only Deniliquin’s agricultural and farming roots, but their self-proclaimed title as the Ute Capital of the World. 

Festival-goers descended on the dusty plains in the southern NSW town for the two-day event on Friday.

Scores of attendees wore their blue singlet in an attempt to beat the ‘bluey’ record of 3959 people donning unofficial traditional attire.

With a line-up of country and rock stars such as Carrie Underwood, Kasey Chambers and Troy Cassar-Daley, more than 20,000 parked their caravans and fitted out their ute for the event.   

This year’s family-friendly event was fit with a mixture of activities ranging from laser-tag, helicopter rides and bull rides. 

More than 20,000 parked their caravans and fitted out their ute for the event

More than 20,000 parked their caravans and fitted out their ute for the event

This year's family-friendly event was fit with a mixture of activities ranging from laser-tag, helicopter rides, bull rides and car races

This year’s family-friendly event was fit with a mixture of activities ranging from laser-tag, helicopter rides, bull rides and car races

This year's family-friendly event was fit with a mixture of activities ranging from laser-tag, helicopter rides and bull rides

This year’s family-friendly event was fit with a mixture of activities ranging from laser-tag, helicopter rides and bull rides

As well as the all-ages events, some revellers to the opportunity to loosen-up making use of generous BYO alcohol allowances. 

In true Australian style, festival-attendee’s whisked off their outback boots, dusted with red-earth for a shoey. 

Revellers were sprawled across the festival grounds necking their beer, wine and spirits from their sweaty shoes.    

Dairy Farmer Troy Rossborough is yet to miss a year since the Deni Ute Muster began in March 1999. 

Revellers were sprawled across the festival grounds necking their beer, wine and spirits from their sweaty shoes

Revellers were sprawled across the festival grounds necking their beer, wine and spirits from their sweaty shoes

Scores of attendee's wore their blue singlet in an attempt to beat the 'bluey' record of 3959 people donning unofficial traditional attire

Scores of attendee’s wore their blue singlet in an attempt to beat the ‘bluey’ record of 3959 people donning unofficial traditional attire

‘I just love the atmosphere,’ the father of two told the ABC.

It gives me a chance to get away from the farm and relax with mates,’ he said. 

Another veteran attendee, Bill Norris said he has seen the festival grow from the humble beginnings, when he was one of 2,000 people.

He first slept under the stars in the back of his ute, but he has since upgraded to a caravan with his wife and pet magpie, Maggie.  

‘We started in the back of an old Landcruiser but we got a bit old for it,’ Mr Norris said.

‘I think you get a bit older, a bit wiser and a bit more keen on comfort,’ he told the publication.      

The festival in Deniliquin is a moment for proud Australians to blow off some steam in the rural New South Wales town

The festival in Deniliquin is a moment for proud Australians to blow off some steam in the rural New South Wales town

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk