News, Culture & Society

Couple showcase their amazing hole-in-the-wall home created from an old factory

A renovation project of epic proportions has seen a Perth-based couple transform a derelict factory into a multi-storied family home.

The visionary abode is the work of architect David Hillman and because of it’s creative fusion of old and new it has become a local Fremantle landmark.

‘It was funny because it was literally like that show Grand Designs and when I first saw the first episode, I said to my wife: “That’s us!”,’ owner Frank Ashe told RealEstate.com.

 

A renovation project of epic proportions has seen a Perth-based couple transform a derelict factory into a multi-storied family home

The visionary abode, which is the work of architect David Hillam, has become something of a local landmark

The visionary abode, which is the work of architect David Hillam, has become something of a local landmark

The property, bought by the Ashes in 2001, was built as a factory in 1951. However, when the pair purchased it, the space was being used as an artists’ collective. 

‘There were painters and sculptors, metal workers, all sorts of things. So, it was quite an interesting space when we first looked at it,’ Mr Ashe said. 

The unique dwelling has four bedrooms and three bathrooms and retains signs of its industrial roots with many of its original features kept intact. 

Mr Ashe said it was always the couple’s intention to ‘build inside the shell’. He said a decision was made to keep the internal walls and the truss roofline. 

While unique dwelling is home to the Ashes and their three kids, the original brief was focussed on entertaining

While unique dwelling is home to the Ashes and their three kids, the original brief was focussed on entertaining

The living room comes with its own temperature-controlled wine storage unit

The living room comes with its own temperature-controlled wine storage unit

Natural elements such as original steel trusses, beautiful recycled timber and whitewashed brickwork have been used to highlight the home’s legacy.

Even the concrete flooring is original from its 1950s heyday.  

‘Our mates thought we were crazy,’ Mr Ashe said of the couple’s renovation project.

‘They were absolutely laughing when we showed them what we had done. They couldn’t believe it.’ 

In addition to its heritage feel, the establishment also embraces a modern minimalist aesthetic. 

Inspiration for the residence came from the time the couple had spent living overseas and after seeing some interesting spaces in larger cities

Inspiration for the residence came from the time the couple had spent living overseas and after seeing some interesting spaces in larger cities

Marble, exposed polished aggregate, steel columns and glass allow for a seamless transition – one designed to work harmoniously between the old and the new.

Mr Ashe said inspiration for the residence came from properties they saw while living overseas and some interesting spaces in larger cities. 

He explained when the couple returned to Perth they had decided they wanted ‘something a little bit different’ to a suburban front yard, back yard set-up. 

The expansive kitchen opens out on to a partially enclosed roof top garden, one that has retained part of the original building

The expansive kitchen opens out on to a partially enclosed roof top garden, one that has retained part of the original building

The dwelling is not only spacious and beautiful but incredibly functional.

A galley kitchen features stainless steel counters, splashbacks, and banks of drawers in fiery red along with a five-burner cook-top and integrated wall ovens.

While the space offers ample room for all manner of events, it also opens on top a rooftop retreat – one that’s has retained part of the original building.

Flowing from the kitchen via sliding glass door, the gorgeous garden nook offers superb views of the city, harbour and wide blue ocean beyond.

Natural elements such as original steel trusses, beautiful recycled timber and whitewashed brickwork highlight the home's manufacturing legacy

Natural elements such as original steel trusses, beautiful recycled timber and whitewashed brickwork highlight the home’s manufacturing legacy

A large sitting room has been combined with a library with whitewashed walls, high sloped ceilings, black steelwork and structural pillars as well as integrated timber bookcases and an open wood-burning French fireplace.

Wine lovers will be thrilled by the temperature-controlled wine store – located in the living room rather than a cellar.

The two ground floor bedrooms feature soaring ceilings, built in wardrobes and en-suites decked out with terrazzo tiles, walk-in glass free showers and white walls. 

Quirky elements such as this hanging wicker seat transform what could be a potential bland space into one filled with warmth and interest

Quirky elements such as this hanging wicker seat transform what could be a potential bland space into one filled with warmth and interest

A third bedroom is also situated on this floor and there’s also a powder room for guests close by.

The home offers a large laundry with streamlined cabinetry and there’s also extra room for a study or office with its own private entrance.

The second level of this home is connected via a statement steel beam staircase which rises to the upper level open walkway and master suite. 

The master bedroom is situated on the second level of the converted factory while the other three bedroom are located on the lower floor

The master bedroom is situated on the second level of the converted factory while the other three bedroom are located on the lower floor

This floor also comes with a guest bathroom and features its own private kitchenette.

Solar panels have also been fitted to the roof making this home one that’s not only sustainable but environmentally sound.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk