News, Culture & Society

Create safe glasses to watch eclipse using cereal box

  • Anyone eager to catch a glimpse of Monday’s solar eclipse but doesn’t want to pay exorbitant prices for special viewing glasses could make their own
  • NASA has come up with low-tech and cost-friendly ideas to make sure people can look at the once-in-a-century eclipse while also preserving their eyesight
  • One solution is making protective eye gear using a ‘cereal box personal theater’ 

Anyone eager to catch a glimpse of Monday’s historic total solar eclipse but doesn’t want to pay exorbitant prices for special viewing glasses could make their own.

Since it is too dangerous to look at the sun during an eclipse with the naked eye, eclipse enthusiasts must use protection.

NASA has come up with ingenious low-tech and cost-friendly ideas to make sure people can look at the once-in-a-century eclipse while also preserving their eyesight, according to The Washington Post.

One solution is making protective eye gear using a ‘cereal box personal theater’.

Find a pair of craft scissors, an empty cereal box, a piece of aluminium foil, tape, and either a small nail, or pushpin.

Using a cereal box, a piece of paper, aluminum foil, a pinprick, and a piece of tape, one can create a ‘cereal box personal theater’ that allows one to safely view Monday’s total solar eclipse

Then you need to take a piece of paper and trace the bottom of the cereal box.

Cut out the traced rectangle from the paper and put it in the bottom of the opened box.

Then cut square holes no bigger than 1.5 inches on the left and right side of the top of the cereal box.

Cut a piece of aluminium foil to cover the left hole and apply tape to cover it.

Then you need to poke a pinhole in the center of the foil. The smaller the hole, the sharper the projected image.

The sunlight is then supposed to go through the hole and be projected onto the piece of paper on the bottom of the cereal box.

All you have to do is look through the other hole and enjoy the show.

During the eclipse, you will see the moon getting in the path of the sun.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk