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Deb Knight says covering the 9/11 ‘changed her career’ forever

Deb Knight says covering the September 11 terrorist attacks ‘changed her career’ forever


Broadcast journalist Deb Knight has opened up about the most formative assignment of her career – the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

‘I was a political journo, a very green political journo at that, and it was my first overseas posting and there I was covering it,’ Deb told 9Honey.

‘It really changed my career and changed my outlook. It hit me personally after the fact, I broke down a couple of times thinking of the impact it had on people’s lives,’ she added.

Broadcast journalist Deb Knight has opened up about the most formative assignment of her career – the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks

Despite saying that the experience was ‘really difficult’, the 2GB host said that she learned a lot.

‘It was a really important learning experience about how to keep your head and to not panic in the face of a big evolving story,’ she said.

‘And when it comes to a big evolving story, you couldn’t get much bigger than that.’

Back in April, Deborah revealed her shock skin cancer diagnosis.

Never forget: The World Trade Center burns after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City

Never forget: The World Trade Center burns after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City

The 48-year-old spoke about her health scare on her 2GB radio show, Afternoons with Deborah Knight.

She admitted that the diagnosis is ‘not the best news’ before urging fans and listeners to regularly get their skin checked.

‘I got my results from the bioscopy on the bump on my nose that my dermatologist was worried about,’ Deb said.

‘I told Ray about it when I had the big whopping band aid on my nose about this time last week… well it’s not the best news. It is a small basal cell carcinoma.’ 

Struggle: Despite saying that the experience was 'really difficult', the 2GB host said that she learned a lot

Struggle: Despite saying that the experience was ‘really difficult’, the 2GB host said that she learned a lot

She added that she has to get it cut out, but assured listeners it is ‘not spreading’ and is ‘not urgent.’

‘So, it’s a small cancer and it’s nodular which means I’ve got to get it cut out. I’ve got to go under the knife.’

She finished: ‘But get your skin checked, we can’t afford not to in Australia. We are the skin cancer capital of the world.’

'It was a really important learning experience about how to keep your head and to not panic in the face of a big evolving story,' she said.

‘It was a really important learning experience about how to keep your head and to not panic in the face of a big evolving story,’ she said.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk