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Deborah Knight questions Bill Shorten’s popularity as she pays tribute to Bob Hawke

‘Why don’t people like you?’ Deb Knight’s VERY ruthless question to Bill Shorten as she says Bob Hawke was far more popular than the Labor leader

  • Today Show host Deborah Knight took a swipe at Bill Shorten and his popularity
  • She asked the Labor leader why he continued to be less popular than Bob Hawke
  • The question comes after Mr Hawke passed away last night at the age of 89
  • His wife Blanche d’Alpuget said in a statement he had passed away peacefully

Today Show host Deborah Knight has taken a swipe at Labor leader Bill Shorten and asked why he is less popular than former prime minister Bob Hawke.

The morning show host asked Mr Shorten why he continued to struggle to draw in the favour of voters on Friday morning. 

‘Hawke was immensely popular – people loved him even if they didn’t like his policies. Why are you still struggling to get voters to like you?’ she asked.

Mr Shorten responded, ‘I think you found and over the election campaign that as people get to see our policies and as we get to meet people, we have been doing better and better. I felt that the momentum has been with us in the last two weeks.

Today Show host Deborah Knight has taken a swipe at Labor leader Bill Shorten and and described him as less popular than former prime minister Bob Hawke

The pointed question comes after Mr Hawke passed away on Thursday night at the age of 89 (pictured, Bob Hawke with partner Blanche d'Alpuget)

The pointed question comes after Mr Hawke passed away on Thursday night at the age of 89 (pictured, Bob Hawke with partner Blanche d’Alpuget)

‘In terms of the people, they will look at the policies. There is a mood for change. I think people want to vote for change to take real action on climate. To take real action in terms of getting wages moving.

The pointed question comes after Mr Hawke passed away on Thursday night at the age of 89.

The legendary politician’s wife Blanche d’Alpuget said in a statement that her husband died peacefully at home.

‘Today we lost Bob Hawke, a great Australian – many would say the greatest Australian of the post-war era,’ she said.

The former union leader dedicated much of his political career to trade union issues, and he was widely regarded as a man of his people.

He had a down-to-earth attitude, a passion for sports and legendary status among beer lovers, for once drinking himself into the record books.

He won four terms as prime minister, serving from 1983 to 1991 before being ousted by his own party when the economy soured. 

Mr Shorten appeared on the Channel Nine talk show on Friday morning to pay tribute to the political stalwart.

‘Bob Hawke was one of my heroes,’ he said.

‘He won the 1983 election when I was in year 11 in school, when my interest in politics was really taking off. He was the first senior adult political leader as I finished my teenage years.’ 

Mr Shorten described the political giant as one of his biggest influences, who paved the way for his career.

‘I loved his approach to politics, it was one of the reasons why I chose the Labor party. 

‘He believed in bringing people together. At the time he got the unions and the employers to sit down, he was about protecting the environment.’ 

More to come

The morning show host asked Mr Shorten why he continued to struggle to draw in the favour of voters on Friday morning

The morning show host asked Mr Shorten why he continued to struggle to draw in the favour of voters on Friday morning

THE LIFE OF BOB HAWKE 

Early life

  • Born December 9, 1929 in Bordertown South Australia.
  • A decade later his family moved to Perth, following the death of older brother Neil.
  • Attended Perth Modern School before studying law at the University of Western Australia.
  • Almost died in a motorbike accident.

Oxford University 

  • Took up a Rhodes scholarship but was only able to after his fiancee Hazel Masterton had an abortion, as it was only open to single men.
  • While his research focused on wage determination, he became better known at Oxford for making the Guinness Book of Records for downing two and a half pints of beer in 12 seconds.

Unions 

  • After returning to Australia and marrying Hazel, he joined the Australian Council of Trade Unions.
  • By 1969 he was ACTU president and the nation’s best known politician outside parliament.

MP to Prime Minister

  • First attempted to enter parliament in 1963, losing to Liberal Hubert Opperman.
  • Elected federal president of the Labor Party in 1973, while also ACTU president. 
  • He was prominent in protests in Canberra after the governor-general dismissed the Labor Whitlam government in 1975.
  • Entered federal parliament at the 1980 election as MP for the Victorian seat of Wills.
  • Became leader of the Labor Party February 1983, less than a month before the Liberal Fraser government called the election.
  • Led the ALP to victory and became prime minister with the campaign slogan Bringing Australia Together.

Achievements as Prime Minister

  • Opened the economy by floating the dollar and deregulating the financial system.
  • Cut tariffs and reformed the tax system.
  • Established Medicare in 1984.
  • Led international efforts to protect Antarctica from mining and to save Tasmania’s Franklin Dam.
  • Increased the old-age pension, doubled public housing funds and the number of childcare places.
  • Established the Asia-Pacific Economic Corporation.
  • Campaigned against apartheid in South Africa.

Downfall as Prime Minister

  • In late 1998 Hawke and treasurer Paul Keating signed the Kirribilli House pact, where he promises to hand over to Mr Keating after the 1990 election.
  • He reneged on the deal.
  • After one failed attempt, Mr Keating toppled him in December 1991. It was the first time Labor voted out a serving prime minister.

Personal life 

  • Married Hazel Masterson in Perth in 1956 and they divorced in 1995.
  • The couple had four children: Susan, Stephen, Roslyn and Robert.
  • He remarried in 1995 to Blanche d’Alpuget, the author of his 1982 biography.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



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