News, Culture & Society

Defiant migrants turns down Mexico’s refugee status offer ass caravan banks presses on to the US

Thousands of Central American migrants have vowed to head for the U.S. border early on Saturday morning, rejecting an offer to apply for refugee status in Mexico with the contingency that they stayed in the country’s two southernmost states. 

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto said that migrants wishing to obtain temporary identification documents, jobs or education for their children could do so by registering for asylum in southern Mexico. 

‘This plan is only for those who comply with Mexican laws, and it’s a first step towards a permanent solution for those who are granted refugee status in Mexico,’ Pena Nieto said in a pre-recorded address broadcast on Friday afternoon.

To qualify for the scheme he called ‘Estas en Tu Casa’ (‘Make Yourself at Home’) migrants had to be in the southern states of Chiapas and Oaxaca, Pena Nieto said. 

But on Friday, a resilient crowd in Arriaga said ‘thank you’ before adding that they were still ‘heading north! for the border. 

‘Our goal is not to remain in Mexico,’ 58-year-old Oscar Sosa said to ABC News. ‘Our goal is to make it to the (U.S). We want passage, that’s all.’ Sosa hailed from San Predo Sula, Honduras. 

Tens of thousands of Central Americans set off for the United States every year, looking to escape violence and poverty. Hondurans, Guatemalans and Salvadorans make up the bulk of illegal immigrants apprehended at the U.S. border

To qualify for the scheme he called 'Estas en Tu Casa' ('Make Yourself at Home') migrants had to be in the southern states of Chiapas and Oaxaca, Pena Nieto said. Pictured: Young migrants rest on pieces of carton boards in Arriaga, Mexico, Friday

To qualify for the scheme he called ‘Estas en Tu Casa’ (‘Make Yourself at Home’) migrants had to be in the southern states of Chiapas and Oaxaca, Pena Nieto said. Pictured: Young migrants rest on pieces of carton boards in Arriaga, Mexico, Friday

But on Friday, a resilient crowd in Arriaga said 'thank you' before adding that they were still going to head 'north' for the border. Pictured: Central American migrants bathe while thousands of people in a caravan of migrants walk on by

But on Friday, a resilient crowd in Arriaga said ‘thank you’ before adding that they were still going to head ‘north’ for the border. Pictured: Central American migrants bathe while thousands of people in a caravan of migrants walk on by

Migrants travel on a cattle truck toward the United States border as a thousands-strong caravan of Central American migrants slowly makes its way toward the U.S.

Migrants travel on a cattle truck toward the United States border as a thousands-strong caravan of Central American migrants slowly makes its way toward the U.S.

Many folks had to use bowls or cups in order to bathe, pouring the water on themselves

Many folks had to use bowls or cups in order to bathe, pouring the water on themselves

Many folks had to use bowls or cups in order to bathe, pouring the water on themselves

Dozens of migrants rest in a train pass in the city of Arriaga as they wait for Saturday morning - when a large chunk of the migrants will continue on their way for the border

Dozens of migrants rest in a train pass in the city of Arriaga as they wait for Saturday morning – when a large chunk of the migrants will continue on their way for the border

Mexico’s government has said that more than 1,700 people in the convoy have registered for asylum, while others have returned home. Estimates on the size of the group vary. 

Alden Rivera, the Honduran ambassador to Mexico, told Mexican radio on Friday that the caravan could reach Mexico City by next Friday. He put an ‘official’ headcount at 3,500, estimating that at least two-thirds of them were Hondurans.

The caravan set off in Honduras nearly two weeks ago, and has picked up other Central Americans en route.

Alexander Fernandez, a Honduran traveling in the caravan, said people began leaving the town of Pijijiapan at about 3 a.m. to head for Arriaga, a town in the west of Chiapas.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto said that migrants wishing to obtain temporary identification documents, jobs or education for their children could do so by registering for asylum in southern Mexico

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto said that migrants wishing to obtain temporary identification documents, jobs or education for their children could do so by registering for asylum in southern Mexico

Alden Rivera, the Honduran ambassador to Mexico, told Mexican radio on Friday that the caravan could reach Mexico City by next Friday. He put an 'official' headcount at 3,500, estimating that at least two-thirds of them were Hondurans

Alden Rivera, the Honduran ambassador to Mexico, told Mexican radio on Friday that the caravan could reach Mexico City by next Friday. He put an ‘official’ headcount at 3,500, estimating that at least two-thirds of them were Hondurans

The caravan set off in Honduras nearly two weeks ago, and has picked up other Central Americans en route

The caravan set off in Honduras nearly two weeks ago, and has picked up other Central Americans en route

Alexander Fernandez, a Honduran traveling in the caravan, said people began leaving the town of Pijijiapan at about 3 a.m. to head for Arriaga, a town in the west of Chiapas

Alexander Fernandez, a Honduran traveling in the caravan, said people began leaving the town of Pijijiapan at about 3 a.m. to head for Arriaga, a town in the west of Chiapas

A banner hanging over a bridge on the migrants’ path read: ‘Your hearts are brave, don’t give up.’

Tens of thousands of Central Americans set off for the United States every year, looking to escape violence and poverty. Hondurans, Guatemalans and Salvadorans make up the bulk of illegal immigrants apprehended at the U.S. border.

On Thursday night, thousands of people took refuge under small tents or teepees made from garbage bags in Pijijiapan’s town square. Many people rushed to a nearby river in the afternoon to wash off the sweat of travel and extreme heat.

A White House official said on Thursday that ‘a wide range of administrative, legal and legislative options’ were being considered regarding the migrants.

President Trump was considering an executive order that would allow the U.S. to deny asylum seekers’ claims if they enter illegally as part of the caravan.

On Thursday night, thousands of people took refuge under small tents or teepees made from garbage bags in Pijijiapan's town square

On Thursday night, thousands of people took refuge under small tents or teepees made from garbage bags in Pijijiapan’s town square

Guatemalan migrant Venancio Alexander Orellana, 24, right, bathes with water from a tanker truck provided by the community

Guatemalan migrant Venancio Alexander Orellana, 24, right, bathes with water from a tanker truck provided by the community

U.S. law permits foreigners who are fleeing persecution in their native countries to apply for asylum on U.S. soil. But Trump’s executive order would suspend this statue for Central Americans as a matter of ‘national security’ in response to his claims that the caravan could contain criminals and terrorists.

Department of Homeland Security Department Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Thursday that ‘everything is on the table’ as she addressed the situation.

‘If they come here illegally with no legitimate reason to stay, they absolutely will be apprehended and removed immediately,’ she told Fox News. ‘They should be seeking refuge in Mexico. To ignore refuge and continue, in some cases, to come to the United States raises questions of what their real motives are.’

She said, ‘This caravan cannot come to the United States…They will not be allowed in. They will not be allowed to stay.

Volunteers from the Mexican Red Cross treat the blistered and cut feet of Central American migrant

Volunteers from the Mexican Red Cross treat the blistered and cut feet of Central American migrant

Migrants disembark from a truck in which they had gotten a ride to get closer to the border

Migrants disembark from a truck in which they had gotten a ride to get closer to the border

Embraced to one of her daughters while the other one sits on a baby cart, an exhausted migrant woman sleeps on the asphalt as they wait for a ride in highway

Embraced to one of her daughters while the other one sits on a baby cart, an exhausted migrant woman sleeps on the asphalt as they wait for a ride in highway

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.