News, Culture & Society

Dietitian Leanne Ward: The six most common diet types – and how to understand them to lose weight 

A scientist and dietitian have revealed the six most common personalities when it comes to diet types, and how you can understand which one you fit to lose weight.

Brisbane dietitian Leanne Ward discussed the diet personalities with expert CSIRO scientist Dr Gilly Hendrie on her podcast Leanne Ward Nutrition.

After surveying 245,000 Australians, Dr Hendrie explained that she and her team found there were six typical behavioural patterns that influence how and why we eat.

‘It’s not about changing your personality, but rather about working with it, recognising your strengths and weaknesses and then choosing a program that suits who you are,’ Dr Hendrie told Leanne.

So what are the six different personalities? 

A scientist and dietitian revealed the six most common personalities when it comes to diet types, and how you can understand which one you fit to lose weight (Leanne Ward pictured)

After surveying 245,000 Australians, Dr Gilly Hendrie (pictured) explained that she and her team found there were six typical behavioural patterns that influence how and why we eat

After surveying 245,000 Australians, Dr Gilly Hendrie (pictured) explained that she and her team found there were six typical behavioural patterns that influence how and why we eat

THE THINKER

Poll

Which diet personality type are you?

  • The thinker 0 votes
  • The pleaser 0 votes
  • The craver 0 votes
  • The foodie 0 votes
  • The battler 0 votes
  • The socialiser 0 votes

The first – and most common – type of Australian who was surveyed was ‘the thinker’.

‘The thinker is a goal-orientated person, who is quite motivated and analytical,’ Dr Hendrie said.

‘If they are not careful, they can be self-critical and susceptible to negative feedback, which can leave them open to stress and anxiety or worry.’

This worry can have a knock-on effect on ‘the thinker’s’ diet – which may lead to a derailment and over-eating.

‘The best approach for the thinker is to try 80/20, whereby they eat healthily 80 per cent of the time and then let themselves be a bit more flexible 20 per cent of the time.’ Dr Hendrie said.

‘If you’re a thinker, you also need to learn to take your mind off your worry, whether that’s going for a walk or doing a puzzle.’

Because ‘the thinker’ is a type A personality, the experts both agreed that such a personality ideally needs to learn to relax around food a little and not be so stringent.

THE BATTLER

The second diet personality is ‘the battler’, and according to Dr Hendrie, this type suffers from ‘regular food temptation or craving tendencies’.

‘Like the thinker, the battler is prone to stress and worry,’ Dr Hendrie said.

Battlers require some unique strategies to help them break the cycle and achieve long-term success in their diet journey. 

They might also benefit from the 80/20 approach and trying to instill the belief that being healthy doesn’t always have to mean being perfect.

If you fall into this camp, try and let yourself snack without demonising certain foods as ‘good’ and ‘bad’.

Stop when you feel full and avoid binge eating.

Leanne (pictured) said she, like most Australians, falls into 'the thinker' camp - and these types are type A personalities who over-think their approach to food

Leanne (pictured) said she, like most Australians, falls into ‘the thinker’ camp – and these types are type A personalities who over-think their approach to food

THE PLEASER

Thirdly, there is ‘the pleaser’.

‘Pleasers are really likeable friendly people, but they tend to look sideways too much and don’t focus enough on their own journey,’ Dr Hendrie said.

‘When you’re always comparing yourself to other people, it’s easy to feel derailed.’

The best approach for this personality type is to get a good support group around you and try to focus on your own journey as much as possible.

‘Concentrate on what you are doing well and what you’ve achieved today,’ Dr Hendrie said.

You should prioritise your own sleep, drinking water and staying connected to friends and family as a few simple ways to practice self-care. 

Many of the different personality types benefit from an 80/20 approach whereby they eat healthily 80 per cent of the time, and then as they wish 20 per cent (stock image)

Many of the different personality types benefit from an 80/20 approach whereby they eat healthily 80 per cent of the time, and then as they wish 20 per cent (stock image)

THE CRAVER

‘The craver is quite self-explanatory,’ the CSIRO expert said.

‘They experience strong food cravings and this can quickly and easily lead to moments of weakness, particularly when food is easy to access.’  

‘The craver’ needs to be careful, whether they are at home, at a party or in the office at work, as they can easily fall victim to their cravings.

‘For some of this type, out of sight, out of mind works, but if that isn’t you, you may need a diet approach that allows you to have a small amount of treats here and there so you don’t feel deprived,’ Dr Hendrie said.

If you do fall off the wagon and go crazy one day, don’t try and fix it by depriving yourself the next.

Just go back to finding normal balance and equilibrium for the best results.

THE FOODIE

The foodie is another common personality type, and this covers anyone who is passionate about food.

‘This personality type loves creating new meals, trying new recipes and preparing good food,’ Dr Hendrie said. 

‘The ideal diet program for this type therefore needs variety with heaps of new recipes, so they never feel too restricted.’

Portion control is important for foodies, but you can still enjoy lots of new foods, even if they are enjoyed in a measured way.

CSIRO recommend you explore new recipes to experiment with creative ways to add flavour and eat more vegetables to boost your nutrition and reduce how many kilojoules you’re eating. 

THE SOCIALISER

The final food personality type is ‘the socialiser’.

‘The socialiser is a people person, so like the foodie, they also need flexibility to be able to go out and socialise with friends and family, and not have too many rules and restrictions around them,’ Dr Hendrie said.

For the socialiser, alcohol could be a ‘danger zone’, so you’ll need to learn strategies to drink sensibly. 

‘The socialiser’ could also use their love of people to their advantage, by asking a friend or family member to do a science-based diet program with them.

Sharing the journey will make your socialising easier.    

To find out which diet personality you are and to take the quiz yourself, head to TotalWellbeingDiet.com

***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk