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Doctor for the Australian cricket team reveals how he eats and exercises during coronavirus lockdown

The former doctor for the Australian cricket team has offered a look at his diet and exercise regime during the coronavirus lockdown – and revealed why you should think twice about taking supplements.

Dr Peter Brukner, 67, is a world-renowned Australian sports medicine clinician and researcher who has held illustrious positions for the Australian cricket team, Liverpool FC, Melbourne and Collingwood AFL clubs. 

And while he might be fit and healthy, Dr Brukner said his age and his profession put him in the ‘at risk’ category – so he has been doing plenty of research over the past few weeks about how he can improve his chances of avoiding the virus.

The doctor behind the Australian cricket team offered a look at his diet and exercise regime during the coronavirus lockdown (Michael Clarke pictured with Dr Peter Brukner in 2014)

Dr Peter Brukner, 67, is a world-renowned Australian sports medicine clinician and researcher who has held illustrious positions for the Australian cricket team, among others (pictured with Michael Clarke in 2014)

Dr Peter Brukner, 67, is a world-renowned Australian sports medicine clinician and researcher who has held illustrious positions for the Australian cricket team, among others (pictured with Michael Clarke in 2014)

Think twice about supplements 

What is Dr Brukner’s day on a plate?

* BREAKFAST: Full fat Greek yoghurt with nuts, seeds and cinnamon.

* LUNCH: Salad or nuts and cheese.

* DINNER: Meat or fish and non-starchy vegetables like broccoli, green beans and cauliflower.

* DESSERT: A square or two of dark chocolate or fresh berries with cream. 

One of the biggest points Dr Brukner was keen to stress is that he is not a massive fan of supplements.

‘I am always asked what supplements I am taking,’ he told the Sydney Morning Herald.

‘My general answer to that question is “none, I get my vitamins and minerals from real food”.’

Dr Brukner said that doctors are often sceptical about the various claims of vitamins, minerals and superfoods, but he admitted he has found some research to suggest certain compounds can help to boost your immunity.

At present, the sports doctor is taking daily doses of Vitamin C, zinc, quercetin and elderberry, but added that you should be wary around the supplement aisle as much of it is marketing and hype.

Dr Brukner said you should be wary of the supplement aisle, as it can be easy to be swayed by marketing. He believes in a wholefoods diet (stock image)

Dr Brukner said you should be wary of the supplement aisle, as it can be easy to be swayed by marketing. He believes in a wholefoods diet (stock image)

Move every single day

One of the most important things Dr Brukner said you must do is some sort of movement, every single day.

He favours a brisk walk daily for at least 30 minutes, as well as a high-intensity session on his stationary bike three times a week.

‘This lasts for eight minutes with 30-second maximal effort followed by a 30-second rest,’ he said.

Finally, the doctor will also do push ups, sit ups, squats and burpees to work on his strength as well as his cardio. 

He also recommends you steer clear of takeaway and instead prioritise eating, fresh and home-cooked meals (stock image)

He also recommends you steer clear of takeaway and instead prioritise eating, fresh and home-cooked meals (stock image)

Choose fresh foods and avoid takeaway

While many are eating more takeaway than usual on account of the fact that they are getting bored of cooking and can’t go out to restaurants, Dr Brukner warns against this and instead says he is looking to boost his fresh, un-processed foods and home cooking.

‘Ultra-processed foods high in sugar, starch and vegetable oils are off the menu,’ he said.

Instead, he is making sure he’s eating lots of fish, meat, eggs, dairy, vegetables, fruit and olive oil. 

A typical day on his plate encompasses full-fat Greek yoghurt for breakfast with nuts, seeds and cinnamon, a salad or nuts and cheese for lunch, and meat or fish and non-starchy vegetables like broccoli, green beans and cauliflower for dinner.

Dr Brukner said he doesn’t deny himself dessert, but it’s usually a square of dark chocolate or some fresh berries with cream.

Get lots of sleep

Lastly, Dr Brukner revealed he is getting as much sleep as possible, even if he feels as though he doesn’t need eight hours.

He said he believes ‘sleep is essential to better health’ and he is prioritising his sleep by not going to bed too late and avoiding both food and screens in the latter part of the evening. 

In recent years, Dr Brukner has become interested in lifestyle issues like smoking and a low carb diet and their relationship with our health (pictured in 2015 with Chris Rogers)

In recent years, Dr Brukner has become interested in lifestyle issues like smoking and a low carb diet and their relationship with our health (pictured in 2015 with Chris Rogers)

In recent years, Dr Brukner has become interested in lifestyle issues like smoking and their relationship with our health.

In particular, he is interested in the role of diet – especially a low carb diet – in both our health and athletic performance.

He lectures regularly and has a best-selling book, A Fat Lot of Good.

To find out more about him, you can visit his website here 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk