News, Culture & Society

Dog owners are warned not to feed pets hot cross buns at Easter

  • A Queensland vet has warned hot cross buns can be lethal in one single bite 
  • The flesh and skin of raisins as well as grapes are toxic to dogs without reason
  • Ellie the dog was rushed to hospital after she was found foaming from the mouth

The sweet treat that is on every Australian table over Easter could potentially kill your dog, according to one Queensland vet.

Hot cross buns are an exciting addition to the kitchen pantry, but one vet from Brisbane is warning a single bite of the seasonal treat could cause your pooch to develop serious kidney problems.

Medicine specialist Dr Emily Cook, from the Animal Referral Hospital, said the raisins in hot cross buns are the problem for dogs but they are yet to figure out why.

Ellie was rushed to hospital after she ate an entire loaf of raisin bread which is toxic to dogs

‘Some dogs are fine and others develop acute kidney problems,’she said to Yahoo Seven.  

The flesh and skin of the raisins toxic and if ingested by dogs they need to be immediately sent to hospital if they eat them.

‘Being Easter, more products are on the market at the moment and people like to just toss their dog a bit of raisin toast or a hot cross bun at breakfast, but even one raisin could be lethal,’ she said.

Medicine specialist Dr Emily Cook from the Animal Referral Hospital said the raisins in hot cross buns are the problem for dogs but they are yet to figure out why

Medicine specialist Dr Emily Cook from the Animal Referral Hospital said the raisins in hot cross buns are the problem for dogs but they are yet to figure out why

One dog called Ellie was rushed to hospital after she was found foaming from the mouth after eating an entire loaf of raisin bread.

Ellie’s family had noticed the raisin bread missing and called in the emergency.

She was placed on a drip for 24 hours and had the entire contents of her stomach emptied

Ellie was placed on a drip for 24 hours and had the entire contents of her stomach bought up at the ARH emergency hospital in Sinnamon Park

Ellie was placed on a drip for 24 hours and had the entire contents of her stomach bought up at the ARH emergency hospital in Sinnamon Park

If untreated she would likely have developed symptoms of kidney failure such as vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, increased thirst and abdominal pain.

The Brisbane animal hospital posted to their Facebook page and warned despite a delicious treat to keep it away from your dogs. 

‘Tempted to share a hot cross bun with your best mate? Unfortunately hot cross buns are toxic to dogs and it’s the inoffensive sultana that causes all the trouble,’ they posted. 

  

Advertisement



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.