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Drug that expels toxin-producing cells and could reverse frailty in old age is being developed

Drug that expels toxin-producing cells and could reverse frailty in old age is being developed by scientists

  • Drugs helped expel biologically-aged cells that produce toxins in the elderly
  • Nine patients with diabetes-related illnesses received medicine used for cancer
  • At the end of three days, the numbers of senescent cells had fallen significantly 

A drug discovery that could reverse the effects of frailty in old age has been announced by scientists.

The treatment helped expel biologically-aged cells that produce toxins – potentially making a 90-year-old feel 40 again.

Nine patients with diabetes-related illnesses received medicine generally used to treat cancer. They were also given a compound found in fruits and vegetables for the study by the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.

The treatment helped expel biologically-aged cells that produce toxins – potentially making a 90-year-old feel 40 again (file image)

At the end of three days, their numbers of senescent cells, those which have biologically aged, had fallen significantly.

James Kirkland, co-author of the paper, said: ‘It may be possible to delay, prevent and alleviate age-related diseases as a group, instead of going after them one at a time.

‘What we’re looking for is to improve quality of life. We don’t want to have people living to 130 and feeling like they’re 130. 

‘It would be good if they could life to 90 and feel like they’re 40.’

It is thought the research could especially benefit patients suffering from Alzheimer¿s (file image)

It is thought the research could especially benefit patients suffering from Alzheimer’s (file image)

Senescent cells are responsible for a variety of diseases in the elderly and have been linked to arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes and dementia.

They increase frailty because they produce damaging toxins that can build up in the body.

It is thought the research could especially benefit patients suffering from Alzheimer’s.

The researchers, whose study is published in the journal EBioMedicine, said more clinical trials were needed to understand the full effects. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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