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Duty-free shopping will return if UK leaves the EU without a deal, Chancellor Sajid Javid reveals 


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Duty-free shopping will return if UK leaves the EU without a deal, Chancellor Sajid Javid reveals

  • Chancellor Sajid Javid will announce a return of duty-free shopping after Brexit
  • When Britain leaves the EU a bottle of wine at Heathrow could be £2.23 cheaper
  • Treasury said holidaymakers able to save more than £12 on two crates of beer 

Duty-free shopping will return if Britain leaves the EU without a deal, Sajid Javid will announce today.

The Chancellor will tell travellers to the EU that they will be able to buy cigarettes and alcohol without paying any UK excise duties.

It means a bottle of wine bought at Heathrow on the way to the continent could be up to £2.23 cheaper. 

Chancellor Savid Javid will tell travellers to the EU that they will be able to buy cigarettes and alcohol without paying any UK excise duties (pictured on The Andrew Marr Show)

The Treasury said this means a holidaymaker would be able to save more than £12 on two crates of beer. 

And those travelling back home will, for the first time in years, be able to bring back a limited amount of cigarettes and alcohol without paying duty.

People travelling back from the EU will still be able to bring unlimited amounts for their own use, provided they pay duty on the continent. 

The changes are possible because, if Britain leaves without a deal, we will no longer be subject to EU single market rules which have been in place since 1999.

Mr Javid said: ‘As we prepare to leave the EU, I’m pleased to be able to back British travellers. 

‘We want people to enjoy their hard-earned holidays and this decision will help holidaymakers’ cash go that little bit further.’ 

Duty free was ended in Europe seven years after the EU single market came into force in 1992. 

Duty-free shopping is already permitted for travellers going to non-EU countries.      

People travelling back from the EU will still be able to bring unlimited amounts for their own use, provided they pay duty on the continent (file image)

People travelling back from the EU will still be able to bring unlimited amounts for their own use, provided they pay duty on the continent (file image)

The Chancellor said that, thanks to the lifting of EU rules in the event of a No Deal Brexit, passengers travelling to EU countries will be able to buy beer, spirits, wine and tobacco without duty being applied in the UK.  

The decision on duty-free shopping in UK ports, airports and international train stations will mean UK excise duty will no longer be due on alcohol and cigarettes bought when leaving the UK.     

People will now also have the alternative option to buy limited amounts of duty-free alcohol and cigarettes at duty free shops in Europe instead.

The limits will be 16 litres of beer, four litres of wine, one litre of spirits and two litres of fortified or sparkling wine. 

For tobacco, the limits are 200 cigarettes, 100 cigarillos, 50 cigars or 250 grams of tobacco.

The travel industry have been calling on the government to re-introduce duty-free, which stopped when the EU Single Market was introduced.

The Chancellor said that, thanks to the lifting of EU rules in the event of a No Deal Brexit, passengers travelling to EU countries will be able to buy beer, spirits, wine and tobacco without duty being applied in the UK (pictured outside the Houses of Parliament yesterday)

Duty-free shopping is already permitted for travellers going to non-EU countries.

The announcement on duty-free shopping does not apply to movements of goods from Northern Ireland to Ireland.

The government needs to take account of the unique position in Ireland and the land border between Ireland and Northern Ireland and any legal constraints that might apply there. EU law does not allow the Irish government to operate duty-free at the land border.

* Last night the Treasury also announced £500million in investment in green technologies.

Some £70million will fund 3,000 new rapid-charge points for electric cars – doubling the number in place by 2024.

These points can recharge a family car in as little as 20 minutes, compared to existing technology which can take 40 minutes.

Another £140million will go towards research into tackling water and air pollution. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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