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Eco-zealot compares herself to a PRISONER OF WAR after football fans pelted her with drinks

A popstar wannabe eco-zealot has compared herself to a prisoner of war after football fans pelted her with drinks when she stormed onto the pitch during a Premier League match.

Louise Harris was spared jail earlier this summer for the disruption caused when she and another protester – both clad in orange Just Stop Oil t-shirts – tried to tie themselves to goal posts during Tottenham Hotspur’s clash with West Ham in March.

Reflecting on the incident, the activist – who self-styles as a ‘pop singer-songwriter – aligned herself with rebels during the Irish War Of Independence.

In a Facebook post, she declared that ‘we must learn form history’ to stop climate activists being executed like rebels were.

The English protester, 24, has even said she would go to war ‘to save the human race’ if the time comes.

However, she followed the sentiment by acknowledging ‘war is awful’ and she would rather ‘be part of nonviolent civil resistance instead.’

It comes as Just Stop Oil has been carrying out a month-long series of protests as it calls on the Government to halt all new fossil fuel licences.

Today, two protesters have been arrested after spraying orange paint over luxury HR Owen, Bugatti, Ferrari and Bentley car showrooms in Berkeley Square, central London.

Meanwhile, seven were detained yesterday after spraying paint on to the facade of 55 Tufton Street in Westminster as the campaign group targeted the headquarters of climate sceptic think tank Global Warming Police Foundation. 

Harris – who posts songs on YouTube including a slickly edited music video called ‘Dating me is like a Cambridge term’ – supposedly came to the realisation that her climate activism shared parallels with the conflict during a holiday to Ireland this month.

It is estimated that 2,346 people were killed or died as a result of the gruelling War of Independence, which ran between 1919 and 1921.

Louise Harris was spared jail earlier this summer for the disruption caused when she and another protester – both clad in orange Just Stop Oil t-shirts – tried to tie themselves to goal posts during Tottenham Hotspur’s clash with West Ham in March

Reflecting on the incident, the activist - who self-styles as a 'pop singer-songwriter - aligned herself with rebels during the Irish War Of Independence

Reflecting on the incident, the activist – who self-styles as a ‘pop singer-songwriter – aligned herself with rebels during the Irish War Of Independence

In a Facebook post, she declared that ‘we must learn form history’ to stop climate activists being executed like rebels were

The English protester, 24, has even said she would go to war 'to save the human race' if the time comes

The English protester, 24, has even said she would go to war ‘to save the human race’ if the time comes

Independence and civil war: Bloodshed in Ireland in the 1920s 

The Irish War of Independence was a guerrilla war fought in Ireland from 1919 to 1921 between the IRA and British forces. 

A ceasefire was agreed in July 1921 and an Anglo-Irish treaty signed that December, leading to the creation of the Irish Free State government.

Under the Anglo-Irish Treaty the six northeastern counties, known as Northern Ireland, remained within the United Kingdom, creating the partition of Ireland.

However, disagreement among Republicans over the treaty triggered the Irish Civil War of 1922 to 1923.

The conflict was waged between the pro-treaty Provisional Government and the IRA, who were opposed to the agreement because they believed it to be a betrayal of the Republic which was declared during the 1916 Easter Rising.

The civil war came to an end in May 1923, with Free State forces declaring victory. Their cause had been boosted by the provision of large numbers of weapons from the British Government. 

The conflict is believed to have killed between 800 and 900 members of the pro-treaty Irish National Army and at least 400 IRA fighters. A further 12,000 members of the IRA were taken prisoner.  

Harris visited a Galway museum during her road trip – which has a room dedicated to the war – and shared a number of anecdotes.

She wrote in a lengthy Facebook post: ‘Activists were, and are, hated by the majority of the general public. At the football action, drinks were thrown at us.

‘At the jubilee action, I was called a ‘stupid b***h’ and a ‘sl*g’. Just look at the hatred Just Stop Oil is receiving in response to throwing a bit of soup on a bit of glass.

‘The public are complicit in the climate crisis every time they choose to side with this genocidal government against activists.

‘You are just as involved as we are. You are either for change or you are for extinction. Which will it be?’

Harris shared pictures from parts of the museum which detailed the suffering that rebels, soldiers and prisoners of war went through during the war.

One was an information board that penned how Irish prisoners of war had mud thrown at them and were ‘booed and hissed’.

Harris continued in her post: ‘It took the executions of Irish rebels for the public to wake up and realise who is the real enemy here.

‘Should climate activists now expect the same fate? No sympathy until we are murdered?

‘It is only a matter of time before you realise who is standing for you, for all of us. ‘But time is what we are running out of. We must learn from history.’

Harris was handed an 18-month conditional discharge and a three-year Football Banning Order in July for disrupting the match at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

In a separate post, speaking of her football pitch invasion, she added that it was ‘one of the scariest, craziest f*****g moments of my life’.

Harris - who posts songs on YouTube including a slickly edited music video called 'Dating me is like a Cambridge term' - supposedly came to the realisation that her climate activism shared parallels with the conflict during a holiday to Ireland this month

Harris – who posts songs on YouTube including a slickly edited music video called ‘Dating me is like a Cambridge term’ – supposedly came to the realisation that her climate activism shared parallels with the conflict during a holiday to Ireland this month

Harris visited a Galway museum during her road trip - which has a room dedicated to the war - and shared a number of anecdotes

Harris visited a Galway museum during her road trip – which has a room dedicated to the war – and shared a number of anecdotes

In a separate post, speaking of her football pitch invasion, she added that it was ‘one of the scariest, craziest f*****g moments of my life’

Harris was handed an 18-month conditional discharge and a three-year Football Banning Order in July for disrupting the match at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium

Harris was handed an 18-month conditional discharge and a three-year Football Banning Order in July for disrupting the match at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium

Harris' music video 'Dating me is like a Cambridge term' has been viewed more than 11,000 times on YouTube

Harris’ music video ‘Dating me is like a Cambridge term’ has been viewed more than 11,000 times on YouTube

The wannabe popstar has posted a number of different songs on the video sharing platform

The wannabe popstar has posted a number of different songs on the video sharing platform

She said: ‘My body was flooded with stress hormones telling me not to do it – not to jump over the barriers, not to run onto the pitch.

‘It won’t work, you won’t get over’. I did get over and even though I didn’t attach myself to the post, it did work. We got our message out there.’

In a GoFundMe appeal page, she raised £185 to cover her court fine.

Harris reportedly said to the judge during her hearing in July: ‘I just want to say that I think it’s highly ironic that on the hottest day the UK has ever had, when thousands of people are going to die from the severe heat, I am being called a criminal.

‘Why is it a crime to run onto a football pitch, to try and stop billions of deaths worldwide, yet ecocide is not?

‘As a judge, you are meant to stand for justice. You are meant to decide what is right. 

‘So tell me – is it right that the UK government is licensing billions of deaths worldwide, through more fossil fuels? Or is it in fact right to stand up against that?’

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk