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Eerie image of boat that evacuated 100 soldiers from Dunkirk wins historic photography competition 


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Eerie image of a boat that evacuated 100 soldiers from Dunkirk but now lies rotting in the mud wins an historic ships photography competition

  • Photographer David Stearne spotted the ship, called Ena, decomposing on a beach in East Anglia 
  • It was built in 1906 and was initially utilised in World War One when it carried supplies of arms to the continent
  • It was then one of 16 sailing barges in 1940 which evacuated troops from beaches during Operation Dynamo

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An eerie photograph of a boat that evacuated 100 troops from Dunkirk but now lies rotting in the mud has won an historic ships picture competition.

Photographer David Stearne spotted the boat, called Ena, decomposing on a beach in East Anglia. 

The black-and-white picture shows the stern of the decaying ship surrounded by debris with clouds looming overhead and smaller boats abandoned in the distance. 

The image fended off hundreds of other entries to be judged as the overall winner in the National Historic Ships photograph competition.

An eerie photograph (above) of a boat that evacuated 100 troops from Dunkirk but now lies rotting in the mud has won an historic ships picture competition. David Stearne spotted the ship, called Ena, decomposing on a beach in East Anglia

Ena was originally built in 1906 in Harwich, Essex, before being purchased by grain and agricultural merchants, R. & W. Paul Ltd.

She initially gained international significance when she was utilised in World War I when carrying supplies to the armies on the continent of Europe. 

But just a few years later she was then used during the Dunkirk Evacuation in May 1940 as one of the 16 sailing barges which evacuated troops from the beaches as part of Operation Dynamo.

She took part in a number of returns to Dunkirk to commemorate the anniversary of the evacuation in later life.

In the 1980s, she was also used as a publicity barge for R. & W. Paul Ltd and attended the European Brewing conventions in London, Maastricht and Helsinki.

Yasmin Steel won the award for the Photograph of the Decade, which was picked from the winners over the last 10 years, with her seasick-inducing image called 50 Degrees South which was taken in the southern hemisphere in rough seas

Yasmin Steel won the award for the Photograph of the Decade, which was picked from the winners over the last 10 years, with her seasick-inducing image called 50 Degrees South which was taken in the southern hemisphere in rough seas 

Sandy Miller won the True Classic category with a picture of Priscilla CK437 at Rowhedge Regatta in Essex

Sandy Miller won the True Classic category with a picture of Priscilla CK437 at Rowhedge Regatta in Essex 

David, whose picture also won the Our Historic Vessels category, took the £1,000 prize.

The photographer, from Eyethorne, Kent, said: ‘This is Ena, Heroine of Dunkirk, which saved 100 lives, now rotting in the mud on the Hoo peninsula.’

Head judge David Newberry added: ‘We found this a very evocative and moving photograph which well portrays the fate which awaits too many of our historic vessels, even those with an illustrious past.’ 

The annual competition also had other category winners.

Stacey Belbin won the Wish You Were Here category with a beautiful sunrise shot at Bradwell-on- Sea in Essex titled Bradwell Balcony

Stacey Belbin won the Wish You Were Here category with a beautiful sunrise shot at Bradwell-on- Sea in Essex titled Bradwell Balcony

Photograph of the Decade, which was picked from the winners over the last 10 years, was the seasick-inducing picture by Yasmin Steel with her piece called 50 Degrees South that was taken in the southern hemisphere in rough seas.

Stacey Belbin won the Wish You Were Here category with a beautiful sunrise shot at Bradwell-on- Sea in Essex.

George Fisk won the Faces of the Sea award with his picture called Larry.

And Sandy Miller won the True Classic category with a picture of Priscilla CK437 at Rowhedge Regatta in Essex.

George Fisk won the Faces of the Sea award with his picture called Larry which he said was made possible by the work of Jack Lowe

George Fisk won the Faces of the Sea award with his picture called Larry which he said was made possible by the work of Jack Lowe

National Historic Ships UK’s annual award is a celebration of maritime heritage around the UK coasts, lakes, and rivers, encouraging people of all ages and backgrounds to engage with historic vessels through photography.

Mr Newberry added: ‘The competition was strong this year with outstanding submissions from a wide range of entrants.

‘The judging panel was delighted to see both professional and amateur photographers represented, although to ensure fairness these details are not disclosed when selecting the best photographs.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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