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Eight in 10 Americans say their lives have been significantly disrupted by coronavirus pandemic

One in five Americans insist their life has NOT been significantly disrupted by coronavirus, despite 275 million people in lockdown and nationwide social distancing guidelines

  • A Gallup poll released Monday found that 81% of Americans have experienced a ‘great’ or ‘fair’ amount of disruption from the coronavirus pandemic 
  • Only 1% of more than 4,400 respondents said their lives weren’t disrupted at all
  • Over the past few weeks nearly every single state has issued stay-at-home orders as thousands of businesses and schools were shuttered
  • The majority of Americans (59%) believe that lockdowns will go on for months 

Eight in 10 Americans say their lives have been significantly disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new Gallup poll. 

Gallup asked more than 4,400 people in the US about how they’ve been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak in the weeks since March 15, a period which saw nearly every single state issue stay-at-home orders as thousands of businesses and schools were shuttered.  

Results released on Tuesday revealed that 81 percent of respondents feel they’ve experienced a ‘great’ or ‘fair’ amount of disruption from the lockdowns between March 30 and April 2, up from 56 percent in the previous polling period.  

Just one percent of respondents said they haven’t experienced any disruption during the crisis.  

Eight in 10 Americans say their lives have been significantly disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new Gallup poll. Pictured: People who lost their jobs wait in line to file for unemployment outside the Arkansas Workforce Center on Monday

Gallup asked more than 4,400 people in the US about how they've been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak between March 15 and April 2, a period which saw nearly every single state issue stay-at-home orders as thousands of businesses and schools were shuttered

Gallup asked more than 4,400 people in the US about how they’ve been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak between March 15 and April 2, a period which saw nearly every single state issue stay-at-home orders as thousands of businesses and schools were shuttered

Americans now expect the disruptions to continue for longer than they thought in mid-March.  

The majority of respondents – 59 percent – said they expect the disruptions to last for ‘a few more months’ – up from about 50 percent who said that in the previous poll. 

Less than 20 percent of respondents were optimistic that the disruptions will end within weeks, down from 37 percent in mid-March. 

On the other end of the spectrum, 22 percent predicted that the disruptions will last through the end of the year – up from 13 percent in the previous poll.  

Younger Americans and those with college degrees were marginally more likely to report higher levels of disruption – but overall responses were evenly spread across age groups, education levels and annual household income.  

Americans now expect the disruptions to continue for longer than they thought in mid-March

Americans now expect the disruptions to continue for longer than they thought in mid-March

Younger Americans and those with college degrees were marginally more likely to report higher levels of disruption

Younger Americans and those with college degrees were marginally more likely to report higher levels of disruption

Overall, the data reflects how nearly every single American has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, which has sickened more than 398,200 and killed at least 12,876 in the US as of Tuesday evening

Overall, the data reflects how nearly every single American has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, which has sickened more than 398,200 and killed at least 12,876 in the US as of Tuesday evening

Overall, the Gallup data reflects how nearly every single American has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, which has sickened more than 398,200 and killed at least 12,876 in the US as of Tuesday evening.  

Another Gallup poll released Monday – which included responses from March 30 to April 2 – revealed that three in four Americans are worried about contracting the virus – up from 62 percent in a previous poll in mid-March.  

A much higher percentage of Democrats (84%) than Republicans (64%) indicated that they were concerned about their risk of exposure – but the numbers were higher across both groups than they were in the previous polling period.   

Eighty percent of women said they were worried, compared with 68 percent of men – despite health data which indicates men are more likely to die of COVID-19.  

Younger Americans, aged 18 to 44, were slightly more concerned about exposure than older respondents – at 78 percent and 71 percent respectively. 

Income did not appear to be a factor, with about 75 percent of each bracket saying they are very or somewhat worried.  

Another Gallup poll released Monday - which included responses from March 30 to April 2 - revealed that three in four Americans are worried about contracting the virus - up from 62 percent in a previous poll in mid-March

Another Gallup poll released Monday – which included responses from March 30 to April 2 – revealed that three in four Americans are worried about contracting the virus – up from 62 percent in a previous poll in mid-March

The graph above show the breakdown of exposure fears by demographic

The graph above show the breakdown of exposure fears by demographic



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk