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Eight-week-old baby who went viral after saying hello appears on This Morning

An eight week-old baby who went viral after saying ‘hello’ to his astonished father has appeared on This Morning to show off his skills. 

Charlie-John Taylor-Mullington stunned mother Caroline, 37, and father Nick, 36, from Willaston, Cheshire, when he replied to his father’s greeting by repeating the word.  

The interaction, which was filmed on Caroline’s mobile phone, saw Charlie strain to form the word his father was saying before eventually managing to formulate a ‘hello’. 

However, a sleeping Charlie remained silent for the interview today, and his mother Caroline admitted that his speaking was only a ‘one off thing’ – prompting viewers to speculate the baby may simply have been ‘gurgling’ in the video. 

Charlie-John Taylor-Mullington watches his father Nick, 36, say the word ‘hello’ at their family home in Willaston, Cheshire

However, a sleeping Charlie remained silent as he appeared on This Morning with his parents for an interview today

However, a sleeping Charlie remained silent as he appeared on This Morning with his parents for an interview today 

‘It totally happened by accident,’ she said. ‘We were saying hello to him and he was really interacting with Nick, so I started filming it for the interaction and then he just said “Hello”.’  

This Morning viewers were sceptical about the extent of his language skills, with one tweeting: ‘Are they all hearing something different?’

Another teased: ‘Give him a wee nudge there sure and ask him about Brexit’.

A third said: ‘It’s a sweet video, but it’s gurgling not hello. Oh and it’s only happened once so what’s the point of all this?’ 

This Morning viewers were sceptical about the extent of his language skills and predicted the baby could have simply been gargling

This Morning viewers were sceptical about the extent of his language skills and predicted the baby could have simply been gargling 

Admitting that not everyone has been convinced, Caroline added: ‘Obviously there are bound to be people out there who say it’s false, we do honestly think he is mimicking the word “hello”.’ 

The mother went on to insist the couple were in ‘total shock’ after the video, but admitted that Charlie speaking was just ‘one off thing’ and they haven’t ‘pressed’ him to continue. 

‘We were in total shock really,’ she said, ‘And the fact we had it recorded as well.’ 

She added: ‘We’ve not really pressed for it since to be perfectly honest, we don’t really see the need to. It was just a one off thing.’ 

Charlie tries to repeat the word his father is saying

The baby is able to repeat the word 'hello'

After straining to repeat the word, Charlie is eventually able to say ‘hello’ back to his father in the video filmed earlier this month 

Father Nick said he was shocked to hear Charlie (pictured) responding to his voice and copying him

Father Nick said he was shocked to hear Charlie (pictured) responding to his voice and copying him

The couple went on to describe how their daughter Lottie, who is now two, also uttered her first words at just six months old – but admitted as new parents, they had no idea how impressive her progress was. 

‘She spoke at six months’, said Caroline, ‘But we were still extremely new parents, we didn’t have anything to compare her progress to.’

During the clip, which was filmed at the family home earlier this month, Nick cradles the infant in his arms and greets him with the word: ‘Hello.’

Charlie-John then opens his mouth and begins to shape the word as his father watches in awe.

The couple went on to describe to hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield (both pictured) how their daughter Lottie, who is now two, also uttered her first words at just six months old

The couple went on to describe to hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield (both pictured) how their daughter Lottie, who is now two, also uttered her first words at just six months old

As his son utters the greeting, Nick smiles before replying: ‘Hello to you as well.’

Following the heartwarming scenes, Caroline said: ‘It was magical. We had tears in our eyes. We were just in utter shock!

‘My husband Nick had Charlie in his arms and was just saying ”hello” slowly to him. I think he loves Nick’s deep voice.

‘Charlie was saying ‘hello’ back a few times and we just decided to film it as we couldn’t believe he was really talking.’ 

When do babies start talking? 

From 0-6 months, babies will start to understand speech and will look at various facial expressions that are being used.  

At about two months, babies will typically be able to make cooing sounds such as ‘aaah’, ‘gah’, ‘ooo’ and often reply with sounds when they are spoken to.

They will also be able to make eye to eye contact and often make sucking, burping and quiet low-pitched contented sounds when they are being fed.    

At around four months children can smile or ‘coo’ at themselves when in front of a mirror,  laugh softly, make high-pitched squeals and will be able to make sounds when looking at toys or people.

By six months most infants can make sounds such as ‘Da’, ‘ga’, ‘ka’, squeal and laugh. They will also show they want to be lifted by holding out their arms.

Infants by the time they reach nine months can copy simple sounds and babble.

They will be able to recognise and understand simple commands such as ‘give it to me’ and can recognise family members.

Children typically speak their first word between 10 and 14 months old.

When they reach 12 months children can say more meaningful words like ‘mamma’ or ‘dadda’ and by eighteen months most infants can say several single words.

By this age they can will also enjoy nursery rhymes and try to join in. They will also obey simple commands, such as ‘bring me your shoes’. 

At around three-years-old children can say their own name, age and sex, list numbers up to ten and understands the uses of ‘You’, ‘Me’, ‘I’.

Earlier this year, researchers from the University of Paris found that babies as young as eight months can understand the basics of grammar before they even start speaking. 

Source: NHS and Great Ormond Street Hospital 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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