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Employees of the North Sea Oceanarium cut the carcass of a humpback whale in Hirtshals 

Employees of the North Sea Oceanarium cut the carcass of a humpback whale in Hirtshals

  • Marine biologists dissected a dead whale in car park of Danish coastal town 
  • Members were invited to come and watch experts cut up the whale carcass
  • Biologists have hopes of uncovering new information on the animal’s anatomy 
  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT 

Employees of the North Sea Oceanarium have cut up the carcass of a humpback whale in a carpark. 

The seven-metre-long creature was caught and killed in fishing nets off Skagen, a port town in northern Denmark, on Monday. 

Members of the public were invited to come and watch the dissection at Hirtshals, which took place at 11am local time on Wednesday morning. 

The whale’s carcass had been stored in cold conditions for two days prior to its dissection. 

Employees from The North Sea Oceanarium prepares to dismember the carcass of a humpback whale in Hirtshals 

North Sea Oceanarium staff members cut up a humpback whale two days after it went into a fisherman's net near Skagen on October 9, 2019

North Sea Oceanarium staff members cut up a humpback whale two days after it went into a fisherman’s net near Skagen on October 9, 2019 

Marine biologists from the North Sea Oceanarium worked alongside experts from the Fisheries and Maritime Museum in Esbjerg while members of the public gathered to watch the process unfold. A taxidermist was also present. 

The whale carcass had been stored at low temperatures after it was brought to land on Monday. 

They used metal hooks and other sharp tools to cut away at the dead whale’s skin and thick layer of blubber to reach the flesh underneath.  

Biologists and other experts participated in the dissection with hopes of finding out new information about the interior anatomy of whales

Biologists and other experts participated in the dissection with hopes of finding out new information about the interior anatomy of whales

Biologists and other experts participated in the dissection with hopes of finding out new information about the anatomy of whales. Samples will be taken from the whale and sent for further testing. 

The marine experts are also planning to conduct research on a parasite found inside its body. 

The procedure began with a one-hour examination of the humpback’s exterior before the animal was sliced open. 

Graphic photos show dissected parts of the animal’s carcass during the process, including its eye and chunks of its pink flesh. 

Denmark does not shy away from publicly dissecting animals for educational purposes and has been known to carry out the public dissection of whales for research purposes. 

Last December, a whale that died close to the harbour at Hobro was dissected in front of several hundred spectators.  

Graphic photos show dissected parts of the animal's carcass during the process, including its eye (pictured) and chunks of its pink flesh

Graphic photos show dissected parts of the animal’s carcass during the process, including its eye (pictured) and chunks of its pink flesh

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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