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Energy Star says homeowners should set their thermostat to 78F during the day and 82F at night

Energy Star says homeowners should set their thermostat to 78F during the day and a balmy 82F at night to cut utility bill costs

  • Energy Star has released recommendations for cutting costs and conserving energy, including setting the thermostat to a balmy 82F at night
  • Despite high summer temperatures Energy Star suggests keeping the thermostat to 78F during the day
  • While out of the house, the program suggests setting temperature to 85F  
  • The federal program is managed by the Department of Energy and the environmental Protection Agency 
  • Every degree raised to set the temperature of central air thermostats saves about three percent on an average utility bill, according to the Dept of Energy 

A federal energy program suggests American households should set their thermostats to 78F degrees during the day to keep their homes cool during the summer without breaking the bank.

Energy Star, a federal program managed by the Department of Energy and the environmental Protection Agency, recommended keeping central air thermostats set to 78F during the day and a balmy 82F or higher while sleeping.

When out of house, Energy Star suggests keeping the temperature at 85F or higher, in its list of energy-saving recommendations.   

The organization says though 78F and 82F may seem like sweltering temperatures, it’ll cut utility bill costs.

Every degree raised to set the temperature of central air thermostats saves about three percent on an average utility bill, according to the Department of Energy.

Energy Star also recommends opening windows to fill the house with cool air at night and shutting the windows and blinds in the morning to keep the cool air indoors. 

The program also suggests sealing one’s home and installing window treatments to prevent heat gain through doors and windows. 

Furthermore small adjustments like turning off appliances and lights when they’re not being used and only washing full loads of laundry and dishes and taking shorter showers make an impact in reducing heat build-up in homes.  

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk