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Experts warn women are adopting veganism to cover up eating disorders

More women are adopting veganism and strict clean-food diets in order to disguise eating disorders, making it more difficult to treat, experts have warned.

The popularity of veganism normalises a restrictive diet that may be unhealthy for some, according to dietitians.

Vegan food products in Australia rose by 92 per cent from 2014 to 2016, according to The Daily Telegraph.

 

More women are adopting veganism and strict clean-food diets in order to disguise eating disorders, making it more difficult to treat, experts have warned (stock image)

'Vegan diets make it more difficult­ for the body to receive adequate­ amounts of some macro- and micro-nutrients due to the exclusion of nutrient-dense animal foods,' dietitian Kate Lane (pictured) said

‘Vegan diets make it more difficult­ for the body to receive adequate­ amounts of some macro- and micro-nutrients due to the exclusion of nutrient-dense animal foods,’ dietitian Kate Lane (pictured) said

The rise of the vegan trend is being fuelled through social media communities that continuously promote a plant-based diet by posting colourful and aesthetically pleasing food photos.

Peer pressure is also a major factor stopping people from giving up unhealthy diets.

The fad has caused concern among dietitians, many of whom believe people are turning to vegan diets for the sole purpose of losing weight.

‘Eating disorders thrive on rules and restriction, and [people] find vegan diets very attractive because they offer simple hard-line rules, cutting out anything derived from an animal source, and provide­ a ‘valid’ reason­ for the restriction,’ Centre for Integrative Health dietitian Kate Lane told The Daily Telegraph.  

Ms Lane said it was recommended for people to turn to a vegan diet only if it was ‘medically necessary’. 

The rise of the vegan trend is also fuelled through social media communities that continuously promote a plant-based diet by posting colourful and aesthetically pleasing food photos (stock image)

The rise of the vegan trend is also fuelled through social media communities that continuously promote a plant-based diet by posting colourful and aesthetically pleasing food photos (stock image)

Ms Lane (left) said it was recommended for people to turn to a vegan diet only if it was 'medically necessary' 

Ms Lane (left) said it was recommended for people to turn to a vegan diet only if it was ‘medically necessary’ 

‘Vegan diets make it more difficult­ for the body to receive adequate­ amounts of some macro- and micro-nutrients due to the exclusion of nutrient-dense animal foods,’ she said.

However, research also shows that a vegan diet can be healthy if it is well-planned.

Ensuring that the body receives sufficient amounts of nutrients and supplements is essential – such as B12, a vitamin that can only be found in animal products. 

By 2020, it is predicted that Australia’s vegan food market will be worth around $215 million, according to market research by Euromonitor International.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk