Extinction Rebellion activists covered in fake oil to protest National Portrait Gallery’s BP deal

Topless Extinction Rebellion activists have covered themselves in fake oil at the National Portrait Gallery in London during a protest against its sponsorship by BP.

Demonstrators from the eco-warrior group teamed up with BP or Not BP? and Culture Unstained as a black liquid was poured on them in the Ondaatje Wing at 4.15pm.

The protesters curled up in the foetal position as others coated them in the ‘oil’ in front of a BP-sponsored art display.

The unauthorised stunt capped a two-week wave of actions by the civil disobedience movement, which led to more than 3,300 arrests in London and cities around the world, the group said. 

Demonstrators from the eco-warrior group teamed up with BP or Not BP? and Culture Unstained as a black liquid was poured on them in the Ondaatje Wing at 4.15pm (pictured)

The protesters curled up in the foetal position as others coated them in the 'oil' in front of a BP-sponsored art display. The XR action called Crude Truth came at the end of the BP Portrait Award exhibition

The protesters curled up in the foetal position as others coated them in the ‘oil’ in front of a BP-sponsored art display. The XR action called Crude Truth came at the end of the BP Portrait Award exhibition

An activist chanted 'NGP, drop BP' (pictured on a poster) during the five-minute protest that saw three people lying down on a plastic sheet

An activist chanted ‘NGP, drop BP’ (pictured on a poster) during the five-minute protest that saw three people lying down on a plastic sheet

The XR action called Crude Truth came at the end of the BP Portrait Award exhibition.

Activists spread a white sheet over the floor of the main hall of the gallery’s Ondaatje wing before two women and a man wearing only skin-coloured underwear adopted foetal positions on the covering. One man chanted ‘NGP, drop BP’ during the five-minute protest.

Eden, 19, who was wearing clothes in his part of the demonstration, said ‘Who will there be left to see, who will there be left to paint, if we have no earth and no people?’, according to the Guardian.

He added: ‘We cannot be artists on a dead planet. Oil means the end but art means the beginning.’

Another activist called Samantha, 37, claimed: ‘The Portrait Gallery is very influential and they need to be leading the way on these issues. But instead they’re doing the opposite by being sponsored by a company who is living in the past when we have the technological knowhow to make renewable energies.’ 

Eden, 19, who was wearing clothes in his part of the demonstration, said 'Who will there be left to see, who will there be left to paint, if we have no earth and no people?'

Eden, 19, who was wearing clothes in his part of the demonstration, said ‘Who will there be left to see, who will there be left to paint, if we have no earth and no people?’

Another activist called Samantha, 37, claimed: 'The Portrait Gallery is very influential and they need to be leading the way on these issues. But instead they're doing the opposite by being sponsored by a company who is living in the past when we have the technological knowhow to make renewable energies'

Another activist called Samantha, 37, claimed: ‘The Portrait Gallery is very influential and they need to be leading the way on these issues. But instead they’re doing the opposite by being sponsored by a company who is living in the past when we have the technological knowhow to make renewable energies’

At the end of the performance, the climate change activists (pictured on the plastic sheet) stood up and cleaned themselves

At the end of the performance, the climate change activists (pictured on the plastic sheet) stood up and cleaned themselves

At the end of the performance, the climate change activists stood up and cleaned themselves.

A board in the National Portrait gallery reads: ‘The BP Next Generation workshops provide inspiration for younger artists developing their portrait-making practice … at the National Portrait Gallery, we would like to extend our gratitude to BP for their continued support.’

It comes after police yesterday launched an investigation into a number of commuters who ‘carried out a vigilante-style attack’ on an Extinction Rebellion protester who scaled a tube train.

Angry commuters dragged climate demonstrators James Mee, 35, and Mark Ovland, 36, from the roof of a train as they attempted to bring chaos to the capital’s morning rush-hour on Thursday.

Commuters at Canning Town station reacted furiously to an XR protester climbing on top of their train

He was dragged off the roof of the carriage after commuters boosted one of their number so he could reach the man's foot

Commuters at Canning Town station reacted furiously to an XR protester climbing on top of their train. Eight XR protesters were arrested as a result of the action but British Transport Police have now confirmed that the commuters involved are also being investigated

In video taken during the incident it then appeared as though a scuffle broke out between the protester and the commuters.

Eight XR protesters were arrested as a result of the action but British Transport Police have now confirmed that the commuters involved are also being investigated.

The XR gang who caused chaos for London Underground commuters were later identified as a Buddhist teacher, a doctor, a grandfather and a vicar. 

Mark Ovland gave up his full-time Buddhist teacher training studies earlier this year to join XR as a ‘full time protestor’. 

Other XR campaigners joining him in the Tube action included pensioner Phil Kingston, 83, who earlier this month was pictured standing on top of a fire engine as activists sprayed 1,800 litres of fake blood over the Treasury.

Self-described Green Christian Ruth Jarman, a 56-year-old vicar, was also pictured protesting on the London Underground network.

Authorities are looking for evidence against a number of commuters who were involved in Thursday’s violent rush hour scenes.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk