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Family’s new home in Hawaii is destroyed by the Kilauea volcano

A California family’s newly built dream home in Hawaii has been destroyed by the state’s erupting volcano just two weeks after they moved to the Big Island. 

Jon Parr said he had spent the last 10 years preparing to move his wife, Zusje, and their two sons from Santa Cruz, California, to Hawaii.

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They sold their home in Santa Cruz to their dream home in Lanipuna Gardens for ‘precisely two weeks’ before they were forced to evacuate when the Kilauea volcano erupted on May 3, eventually causing fissure No. 20 to open just 200 feet from their home.

‘We were living the dream for two weeks,’ Jon, who owns an aquaponics consulting business, told NBC. ‘We’ll get back there; we had a taste.’  

  

Jon Parr (pictured with his wife and their two sons) said he had spent the last 10 years preparing to move his wife, Zusje, and their sons from Santa Cruz, California, to Hawaii

They sold their home in Santa Cruz and moved onto a macadamia nut farm near Pahoa. The Parr family lived in their dream home (pictured) in Lanipuna Gardens for 'precisely two weeks' before they were forced to evacuate when the Kilauea volcano erupted on May 3, eventually causing fissure No. 20 to open just 200 feet from their home

They sold their home in Santa Cruz and moved onto a macadamia nut farm near Pahoa. The Parr family lived in their dream home (pictured) in Lanipuna Gardens for ‘precisely two weeks’ before they were forced to evacuate when the Kilauea volcano erupted on May 3, eventually causing fissure No. 20 to open just 200 feet from their home

The Parr's eldest son, TJ Parr (right)said: 'My mom was having a really hard time, so that has kind of been the hardest part, is just watching my parents have a hard time with losing everything'

The Parr’s eldest son, TJ Parr (right)said: ‘My mom was having a really hard time, so that has kind of been the hardest part, is just watching my parents have a hard time with losing everything’

Since their home was destroyed, the family moved back to a rental house in Monterey. The Parr family said they purchased the home in a foreclosure sale. Jon said their insurance that would cover the damage won't kick in for another six months. The green circle in this photo shows where the Parr family home once stood 

Since their home was destroyed, the family moved back to a rental house in Monterey. The Parr family said they purchased the home in a foreclosure sale. Jon said their insurance that would cover the damage won’t kick in for another six months. The green circle in this photo shows where the Parr family home once stood 

The Parr’s eldest son, TJ Parr told SFGate: ‘My mom was having a really hard time, so that has kind of been the hardest part, is just watching my parents have a hard time with losing everything.’

His mother and younger sibling were forced to evacuate their new home within hours of the eruption while TJ and his father were still in California. 

Since their home was destroyed, the family moved back to a rental house in Monterey. The Parr family told SFGate that they purchased the home in a foreclosure sale.  

Jon said their insurance that would cover the damage won’t kick in for another six months.  

A GoFundMe account set up for the Parr family has raised more than $19,000 that will go toward helping the family get back on their feet. 

The Parr family aren’t the only ones who have been left heartbroken from the loss of their home.  

The Friend family who were forced to evacuate when Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupted returned home on Monday to find the property perched dangerously on top of a 10-foot wide crack

The Friend family who were forced to evacuate when Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano erupted returned home on Monday to find the property perched dangerously on top of a 10-foot wide crack

Noah Friend, his fiance Shantel Pacarro and their two children Naiah, 12, and Nainoa, 11, returned home this week to find their property perched dangerously on top of a massive 10-foot wide crack.

They visited the property in the Leilani Estates Subdivision on Hawaii’s Big Island briefly on Monday.

The family found the huge crack, which runs 500 feet through the backyard and directly under the home, threatening to swallow the property whole. 

Tiny cracks started to appear after the family were first evacuated earlier this month when earthquakes occurred as a result of the erupting volcano. 

‘Every time we would go home it either grew in width or in length. With every tremor and every earthquake it’s opening up the crack even more,’ a devastated Pacarro told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

‘There’s a possibility the crack might get so wide the house could collapse and fall in.’

Her fiance Noah has lived in the home since 1991 and he inherited it from his father 13 years ago when he started his own family.

‘It’s just heartbreaking. There’s so many memories in that house. This is very devastating for our whole family, even our children. They grew up there. It’s the only home they knew,’ Pacarro said.

‘We’re all heartbroken.’ 

The huge crack, which runs 500 feet through the backyard and directly under the home, is threatening to swallow the property whole

The huge crack, which runs 500 feet through the backyard and directly under the home, is threatening to swallow the property whole

Noah Friend, his fiance Shantel Pacarro and their two children Naiah, 12, and Nainoa, 11, found the huge crack on Monday. It had opened up considerably since they last checked on Friday

Noah Friend, his fiance Shantel Pacarro and their two children Naiah, 12, and Nainoa, 11, found the huge crack on Monday. It had opened up considerably since they last checked on Friday

The huge crack stretches 500-feet through the family's backyard, into their neighbor's property and stops at the road

The huge crack stretches 500-feet through the family’s backyard, into their neighbor’s property and stops at the road

Cracks like the one at Noah's property (above) have been opening up across the neighborhood and have already swallowed homes whole

Cracks like the one at Noah’s property (above) have been opening up across the neighborhood and have already swallowed homes whole

The driver of this van got caught in one of the huge cracks that opened up in the Leilani Estates

The driver of this van got caught in one of the huge cracks that opened up in the Leilani Estates

Friend had helped his father build the home in the Leilani Estates when he was just a child. 

‘My father-in-law, all his hard work and sweat… he wanted to pass it on to his son hoping that he would pass it on to his children,’ Pacarro said. 

‘He’s hurting the most.’ 

The family were among the 2,000 residents to evacuate a few weeks ago when the volcano first erupted on May 3.

They took photographs and important documents with them, but left everything else behind. 

Since then, the house has shifted about four feet and now leans to one side. The rest of their belongings have been destroyed by sulfur dioxide as a result of the eruptions. 

The volcano has opened more than 20 vents in the ground that have released lava, sulfur dioxide and steam 

The volcano has opened more than 20 vents in the ground that have released lava, sulfur dioxide and steam 

This photo was taken in 2017
And this image was captured on Wednesday

These photos show a comparison of the Leilani Estates subdivision and just how much damage the erupting volcano has caused. The left picture was taken in 2017 and the right image was captured on Wednesday

Fissures continued to spew lava in the Leilani Estates subdivision on Tuesday - weeks after the volcano first erupted on May 3

Fissures continued to spew lava in the Leilani Estates subdivision on Tuesday – weeks after the volcano first erupted on May 3

Scientists captured these rare images of the volcano producing methane and 'eerie' blue flames as a result of burning lava beneath the ground

Scientists captured these rare images of the volcano producing methane and ‘eerie’ blue flames as a result of burning lava beneath the ground

This Wednesday photo provided by the US Geological Survey shows the active fissure complex near Pahoa, Hawaii

This Wednesday photo provided by the US Geological Survey shows the active fissure complex near Pahoa, Hawaii

Since the eruption 50 buildings, including about two dozen homes, have been destroyed

Since the eruption 50 buildings, including about two dozen homes, have been destroyed

Their neighbor Tam Hunt shared footage on Facebook of the huge crack threatening to swallow the home. 

Hunt’s home is still in tact but the crack also runs through his yard, which means he will never be able to live there again. He only bought the home last year. 

‘I knew it was covered by lava hundreds of years ago, but I didn’t expect it to happen a year after I bought my home,’ Hunt said. 

‘You’re playing the odds. I’m in this weird limbo state where my house is not destroyed but I can’t use it. It’s a weird place to be in. Everybody’s trying to figure out how to rebuild and how to recover from this.’ 

A family friend have started a GoFundMe page for the family of four to help cover costs. 

A third lava flow from Hawaii’s erupting Kilauea volcano streamed into the ocean on Thursday as US Marines Corps helicopters stood by to evacuate a Big Island community should molten rock or huge cracks block its final escape route.

Six huge fissures sent rivers of molten rock through a blackened, volcanic wilderness that was once jungle, farmland and rural homes.

The US Marine Corps deployed two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters to Hilo, about 24 miles north, in support of a task force standing by in case an air evacuation is needed. Each helicopter can carry up to 50 people at a time.

‘We now have the capacity to evacuate all of the estimated population of lower Puna south of the lava flow within a few hours,’ Brigadier General Kenneth Hara of the Hawaii National Guard said in a statement.

Road crews dumped material into cracks on the road and covered them with steel plates in an effort to keep the highway open. 

Lava spews high into the air in the Leilani Estates area near Pahoa, Hawaii, in this Wednesday May 23 photograph

Lava spews high into the air in the Leilani Estates area near Pahoa, Hawaii, in this Wednesday May 23 photograph

Lava spewed from the volcano's East Rift Zone on Wednesday just feet from people's homes in Pahoa

Lava spewed from the volcano’s East Rift Zone on Wednesday just feet from people’s homes in Pahoa

The lava has been pouring down the flank of the volcano in Hawaii and into the ocean miles away

The lava has been pouring down the flank of the volcano in Hawaii and into the ocean miles away

A man walks down a road as lava erupts from the ground in this May 23 photograph

A man walks down a road as lava erupts from the ground in this May 23 photograph

Lava can be seen erupting from the ground in  this photograph taken Wednesday, sending plumes of smoke into the air

Lava can be seen erupting from the ground in  this photograph taken Wednesday, sending plumes of smoke into the air

The National Guard watches as a lava lake forms in the Leilani Estates subdivision on May 23, 2018, in  Hawaii

The National Guard watches as a lava lake forms in the Leilani Estates subdivision on May 23, 2018, in Hawaii

‘Talks and discussions have been underway for possible air evacuations if it did come to that,’ Tim Sakahara, Hawaii Department of Transportation, told reporters in a conference call.

Up at Kilauea’s 4,091-foot summit, at least 12 explosions a day on average are pumping ash plumes thousands of feet into the sky. 

Ash drifted up to 26 miles southwest to dust the black sands of Punaluu beach with gray powder before blowing out to sea.

Scientists said Thursday that ash emissions from Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island reached 6,000 feet but quickly dispersed.

The ash is settling in small communities that are downwind. Trade winds are blowing the ash to the southwest.

Volcanic gas emissions at the summit remain high and the high levels increase the potential for volcanic smog that’s called ‘vog’.

Emissions are also high at fissures that began opening up earlier this month in communities about 25 miles from the summit. Lava continues to erupt in two evacuated subdivisions.

Hawaii County has ordered about 2,000 people to evacuate from Leilani Estates and surrounding neighborhoods since the eruption began on May 3.

The volcano has opened more than 20 vents in the ground that have released lava, sulfur dioxide and steam. The lava has been pouring down the flank of the volcano and into the ocean miles away.

Since the eruption 50 buildings, including about two dozen homes, have been destroyed. One person was seriously injured after being hit by a flying piece of lava.

Lava gushes from a fissure eruption of the Kilauea Volcano in the Leilani Estates

Hawaii County has ordered about 2,000 people to evacuate from Leilani Estates and surrounding neighborhoods

Lava gushes from a fissure eruption of the Kilauea Volcano in the Leilani Estates. Hawaii County has ordered about 2,000 people to evacuate from Leilani Estates and surrounding neighborhoods

A US National Guard soldier (right) takes photos as lava erupts and flows from a Kilauea volcano fissure in Leilani Estates

A US National Guard soldier (right) takes photos as lava erupts and flows from a Kilauea volcano fissure in Leilani Estates

Resident Kathy Threlfall (right) takes photos as local homeowner Chloe Child (left) looks on as lava flows from a Kilauea volcano fissure

Resident Kathy Threlfall (right) takes photos as local homeowner Chloe Child (left) looks on as lava flows from a Kilauea volcano fissure

Gabe Humphries films lava as it shoots from a fissure during the eruption of the Kilauea Volcano near Pahoa, Hawaii

Gabe Humphries films lava as it shoots from a fissure during the eruption of the Kilauea Volcano near Pahoa, Hawaii

Only one person has been seriously hurt as a result of the eruption when they were hit by a flying piece of lava

Only one person has been seriously hurt as a result of the eruption when they were hit by a flying piece of lava

Officials said Wednesday that lava spatter from the erupting volcano is creating a wall that's helping protect a nearby geothermal plant 

Officials said Wednesday that lava spatter from the erupting volcano is creating a wall that’s helping protect a nearby geothermal plant 

Scientists managed to capture rare images of blue flames burning from cracks in the pavement as the Kilauea volcano gushes fountains of lava in the background.   

Volcanos produce methane when hot lava buries and burns plants and trees. The gas flows through the ground and up through existing cracks.

The methane can seep through cracks several feet away from the lava. It can also cause explosions when it’s ignited while trapped underground.

Officials said Wednesday that lava spatter from the erupting volcano is creating a wall that’s helping protect a nearby geothermal plant.

US Geological Survey scientist Wendy Stovall said lava erupting from a vent closest to Puna Geothermal Venture is shooting higher than lava coming out of other vents.

She says it’s also producing the highest lava wall, which is blocking molten rock from flowing north toward the plant.

Residents have been concerned about hazards if lava flowed over the plant’s facilities or if the molten rock heated chemicals at the plant. 

Officials shut down Puna Geothermal shortly after Kilauea began erupting. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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