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Feeling seal-eepy: Pup with umbilical chord still attached takes a nap

Feeling seal-eepy: Pup with umbilical chord still attached takes a nap on a PLASTIC BOTTLE on UK beach

  • The seal appeared blissfully unaware of the dangers plastic poses to its kind
  • The grey seal pup is so young still had its umbilical cord attached to its stomach
  • The sweet images were taken by amateur photographer John Evered

A soundly sleeping baby seal laid its head on a plastic bottle just days after it had been born on Horsey beach in Norfolk.

The seal appeared blissfully unaware of the dangers plastic poses to its kind and the many other sea creatures threatened by plastic litter.

The grey seal pup, which was so young still had its umbilical cord attached to its stomach, used the plastic drinks bottle as a pillow.

The sweet images were taken by amateur photographer John Evered, 52, who said: ‘It was such an amazing sight. There were hundreds of seals all over the beach.’ 

A soundly sleeping baby seal laid its head on a plastic bottle just days after it had been born on Horsey beach in Norfolk

The grey seal is the largest of the species found in the UK, and are often spotted bobbing in the waves by fisherman and sailors in the waters surrounding the British Isles.

The seals, scientifically known as Halichoerus grypus which means hook-nosed sea pig, is a large mammal which spends the majority of its time out at sea where it feeds on small fish.

They can also be spotted lounging on rocks and beaches where they spend time digesting their food before heading back out to sea for their next haul.  

The seal appeared blissfully unaware of the dangers plastic poses to its kind and the many other sea creatures threatened by plastic litter

The seal appeared blissfully unaware of the dangers plastic poses to its kind and the many other sea creatures threatened by plastic litter

Another time the seals will be found on land is when they come ashore to give birth to their young, large groups of seals breed on the east coat of England such as Horsey.

The fluffy white youngsters are born between the months of September and December and will remain on land until they have shed their fluff and put weight on, meaning they are ready to hunt for themselves.

Their size is considerably bigger than the common seal and can be distinguished by it’s sloping profile, they also have parallel nostrils rather than the V-shaped ones that it’s relatives have. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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