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Fish that can live on LAND and eats mammals is found in a Georgia pond for the first time

Vicious Chinese Snakehead fish that can live on LAND for four days, grow up to 3ft-long and eat mammals is found in a Georgia pond, as authorities say kill them immediately if found

  • An invasive fish named the Northern snakehead has been found for the first time in a pond in Gwinnett County, Georgia 
  • The Northern snakehead is native to the Yangtze River basin in China, but has been found in 14 U.S. states
  • The fish species can grow 3-feet long and survive for up to four days out of water
  • Officials are concerned the predatory species will  overtake native aquatic wildlife species, since it is known to eat other fish, frogs, small reptiles, crustaceans, birds and some mammals
  • The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is telling people who encounter the fish to ‘kill it immediately’ 

An invasive Chinese fish that can survive for several days on land and is predatory has been found in Georgia – and state wildlife officials are telling people to ‘kill it immediately.’

The unexpected fish was found in Gwinnett County in early October in a pond attached to private property. 

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resource Division (WRD) confirmed this is the first time the species has been found in Georgia. 

The Northern snakead (pictured), native to the Yangtze River basin in China, has been found for the first time in a private pond in Gwinnett County, Georgia

Matt Thomas, Chief of Fisheries for the Wildlife Resources Division, told CBS 46 that officials are investigating where the fish came from. 

He said: ‘Our first line of defense in the fight against aquatic invasive species, such as the northern snakehead, are our anglers.’

What to do if you see a Northern snakehead

The Wildlife Resources Division – Georgia DNR has released the following protocol: 

– DO NOT RELEASE IT.

– Kill it immediately and freeze it.

– If possible, take pictures of the fish.

– Note where it was caught (waterbody, landmarks or GPS coordinates).

– Immediately report it to your regional Georgia DNR Wildlife Resources

‘Thanks to the quick report by an angler, our staff was able to investigate and confirm the presence of this species in this water body. We are now taking steps to determine if they have spread from this water body and, hopefully, keep it from spreading to other Georgia waters.’

According to the press release, the Northern snakehead is native to the Yangtze River basin in China.

They grow up to 3-feet in length and are able to breathe air, allowing them to survive on land.

The Northern snakehead have an ‘air bladder’, according to the Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force, and can spend four days out of water. 

The fish species can also burrow into mud, extending the time it can stay our of water.  

The Northern snakehead (pictured) can grow up to 3-feet long, spend four days out of water and is predatory to a list of animals

The Northern snakehead (pictured) can grow up to 3-feet long, spend four days out of water and is predatory to a list of animals 

The Wildlife Resources Division - Georgia DNR has released a protocol on what to do if residents happen upon the Northern snakehead (pictured)

The Wildlife Resources Division – Georgia DNR has released a protocol on what to do if residents happen upon the Northern snakehead (pictured) 

The task force says: ‘This unique adaptation and their ability to travel over land to new bodies of water by wiggling their bodies over the ground, gives the snakehead a competitive edge over other fishes in securing habitat and expanding its range.’

The Northern snakehead has been caught in 14 U.S. states so far, but officials are chalking up the surprise appearances to ‘unauthorized release.’

Officials are concerned about the Northern snakehead infiltrating U.S. water because they are ‘voracious predators.’ 

The task force reports that this fish species eats other fish, frogs, small reptiles, crustaceans, birds and some mammals. 

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources have released a ‘how to’ list in case residents stumble upon the invasive fish.

The best course of action is to kill the fish, freeze it, note where the fish was found and report it to officials.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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