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Florida zoo welcomes baby albino alligator siblings born to albino parents, second time in two years

Florida zoo welcomes baby albino alligator siblings born to albino parents – the second time in a year the park has welcomed snowy-white baby reptiles

  • Wild Florida announced two more albino alligators were born earlier this month 
  • 18 eggs were produced in April, but after incubation, care and monitoring, two eggs hatched 
  • In August 2020, eggs from parents Snowflake and Blizzard also produced  albino alligators 
  • The new unnamed babies will eventually be put on display in the future
  • The rare attribute stems from leucism, a condition that causes the loss of pigmentation 

A zoo in Florida has welcomed two albino baby alligators born to albino parents.   

Wild Florida, in Keansville, Florida, announced that two more of the pale alligators have been born, after they hatched from their eggs earlier this month. 

A group of 18 eggs were produced in April, but after several months of incubation, care and monitoring, two eggs hatched, officials at the park told Click Orlando.

Wild Florida announced two more albino alligators were born earlier this month

18 eggs were produced in April, but after incubation, care and monitoring, two eggs hatched

18 eggs were produced in April, but after incubation, care and monitoring, two eggs hatched

The new babies, which do not yet have a name, will eventually be put on display for guests at a yet-to-be-determined time in the future

The new babies, which do not yet have a name, will eventually be put on display for guests at a yet-to-be-determined time in the future

The new birth – which stem from parents, Snowflake and Blizzard, albinos themselves – marks the second time in two years that albino alligators have hatched.

 

‘We’re so proud of our albino alligator parents, Snowflake and Blizzard, and our Croc Squad team for helping these hatchlings,’ said Sam Haught, co-owner and co-founder of Wild Florida told the news outlet.

‘With our Croc Squad overseeing these eggs, we’re hoping that these alligators will help engage more visitors, locals and tourists alike, with their environment.’

The rare attribute stems from leucism, a condition that causes the loss of pigmentation.

Pigment cells fail to develop during differentiation, so the animal’s (in this case, reptile) body is incapable of making pigment.

Eighteen eggs were collected from Snowflake and Blizzard on April 30, but only two so far have hatched. The incubation period of an alligator is about 65 days, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN. 

The new babies, which have not yet been named, will eventually be put on display for guests at a yet-to-be-determined time in the future.

Twelve-year-old Blizzard (left) and 23-year-old Snowflake (right) have been a part of Wild Florida's 'Gator Park' since 2017

Twelve-year-old Blizzard (left) and 23-year-old Snowflake (right) have been a part of Wild Florida’s ‘Gator Park’ since 2017

Blizzard, 12, and Snowflake, 23, have been a part of Wild Florida’s ‘Gator Park’ since 2017.

At 10 feet-long, Blizzard is two feet longer than his beau, but there are other differences between the two albinos as well, Wild Florida said.

Both of Blizzard’s eyes are an ‘opaque white,’ akin to milk, whereas Snowflake’s right eye is opaque white, but her left eye has red birthmarks. 

In August 2020, eggs from Snowflake and Blizzard produced four albino alligators, according to Florida Today. 

It’s believed that there are roughly 100 albino alligators in the world and only 12 in human care, Wild Florida stated. 

Alligators can live between 35 and 50 years in the wild, but between 65 and 75 years in human care, Wild Florida added. 

In 2017, an albino alligator named Pearl was captured on film creeping out of the water, attempting to grab a hat after a keeper at Gatorland in Orlando teased her by hitting her on the nose with it. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk