News, Culture & Society

Ford connected car technology warns drivers of accidents, tailbacks or freak weather


Buying or leasing a car in the UK? Check MOT of car before you do.

Ford drivers will soon get warnings from their CAR about accidents, traffic jams and bad weather on the road ahead

  • Local Hazard Information Technology (LHI) was first tested on the Ford Puma 
  • Trial success means Ford is rolling out to the rest of its vehicles this year  
  • Company claims it wants 80% of Ford vehicles to  be fitted with the tech in 2020  

Ford wants to fit 80 per cent of its 2020 vehicles with technology that warns drivers about upcoming road accidents, bad weather and traffic jams.   

It is rolling out its Local Hazard Information Technology (LHI) after a successful European trial of the tech on its Ford Puma. 

The system pools data from other connected road users, emergency services and the authorities and beams it from the cloud directly to the car. 

Alerts pop up on the car’s dashboard display warning the driver about what lies around the corner. 

  

Ford wants to fit 80 per cent of its 2020 vehicles with its Local Hazard Information Technology (LHI) after a successful European trial of the tech on its Ford Puma 

Ford claims the system will be triggered by what happens to Ford cars ahead that are equipped with its FordPass Connect embedded modem – which connects to the internet with a 4G connection.

A variety of events can trigger an alert, including airbag deployment, hazard warning lights activated or windscreen wipers in use. 

Ford claims the service could also be used for everything from freak hailstorms, to sudden flooding or even landslides. 

Unlike current apps that require manual input, this will all be done autonomously.  

The Ford Puma (pictured),a mini-SUV sold from last year in Europe was fitted with the tech in a trial and Ford is now expanding the use of the system to more vehicles. Information from connected vehicles will be stored in the cloud as well as information from emergency services and the authorities

The Ford Puma (pictured),a mini-SUV sold from last year in Europe was fitted with the tech in a trial and Ford is now expanding the use of the system to more vehicles. Information from connected vehicles will be stored in the cloud as well as information from emergency services and the authorities

Joerg Beyer, executive director of engineering at Ford in Europe, said: ‘What makes Local Hazard Information different is that it is the cars that are connected – via the Internet of Things. 

‘There is no reliance on third party apps. This is a significant step forward. Warnings are specific, relevant and tailored to try to help improve your specific journey.’ 

Apps like Waze have been extremely popular with drivers as road users crave information on the current conditions as well as wanting real-time updates on what’s happening ahead.  

The modem that connects to the internet is connected and fitted as standard and connectivity comes free for a year. 

Continued use of the service will cost customers an annual subscription fee of £60 + VAT. 

HOW DOES FORD’S LOCAL HAZARD INFORMATION WORK?

Unlike current apps that require manual input, data will be provided autonomously. 

Ford cars equipped with the FordPass Connect embedded modem – which connects to the internet with a 4G connection – will automatically upload data about what is happening on the road. 

This will be stored in the cloud and complimented with information from emergency services and the authorities.

Information about what is happening on the road will then be sent to nearby road users who may be out of sight, but would benefit from the information. 

It will pop up on the dashboard of the Ford cars.  



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.