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Former Labor leader Mark Latham says Anthony Albanese, Tanya Plibersek will be ‘worse than Shorten’

Fallen Labor leader Bill Shorten has appeared with his wife Chloe and put on a brave face as two hard-left frontbenchers declared their interest in taking over.

Anthony Albanese and Tanya Plibersek, who represent neighbouring Sydney inner-city electorates, on Sunday made their pitches to replace him as Opposition Leader, following Labor’s third consecutive election loss.

Mr Shorten resigned as leader Saturday night as he became the first Labor leader since Kim Beazley to have lost two elections in a row, as voters in north Queensland, Tasmania, outer Brisbane and western Sydney turned on the Opposition.

 

Fallen Labor leader Bill Shorten has appeared with his wife Chloe and put on a brave face as two hard-left frontbenchers declared their interest in taking over

Mr Shorten's deputy of six years Tanya Plibersek (right with husband Michael Coutts-Trotter) is vying to lead Labor

Former deputy prime minister Anthony Albanese hasdeclared he will contest the Labor leadership

Anthony Albanese (right) and Tanya Plibersek (left with husband Michael Coutts-Trotter), who represent neighbouring Sydney inner-city electorates, on Sunday made their pitches to replace him as Opposition Leader, following Labor’s third consecutive election loss

Former Labor leader Mark Latham, who lost the 2004 election despite a series of positive opinion polls, said Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek would be even worse than Mr Shorten, who hails from Labor’s Right faction.

‘If you think Shorten was bad, wait for one of the inner-city lefties to take over,’ he tweeted on Sunday afternoon.

Mr Latham, who is now a One Nation MP in the New South Wales upper house, said Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek would be electoral poison in the outer suburbs and regional centres.

‘Albo and Tanya believe in open borders, 100 per cent renewables, even higher taxes plus divisive identity politics,’ he said. 

Former Labor leader Mark Latham, who lost the 2004 election despite a series of positive opinion polls, said Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek would be even worse than Mr Shorten, who hails from Labor's Right faction

Former Labor leader Mark Latham, who lost the 2004 election despite a series of positive opinion polls, said Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek would be even worse than Mr Shorten, who hails from Labor’s Right faction

Mr Latham, who is now a One Nation MP in the New South Wales upper house, said Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek would be electoral poison in the outer suburbs and regional centres

Mr Latham, who is now a One Nation MP in the New South Wales upper house, said Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek would be electoral poison in the outer suburbs and regional centres

‘Labor took the wrong policy turn a decade ago and now this cr*p baked into the culture.’ 

The Labor Party appears to have lost at least five seats, causing its tally in the 151-member House of Representatives to fall to 66, compared with 74 so far for the Coalition.

LABOR LEADERSHIP RULES

Labor leadership contenders need to have 20 per cent caucus support to nominate for the top job.

Rank-and-file party members get a say in the leadership if there are more than two contenders. 

There is a 50 per cent weighing between the Labor caucus in federal Parliament and party members.

Former prime minister Kevin Rudd introduced the rules in 2013, to avoid a repeat of a sitting PM being knifed for fellow Labor MPs. 

The Opposition had campaigned to scrap negative gearing tax breaks for existing properties, from January, and deprive some share-owning retirees of franking credits. 

It had also vowed to increase taxes and block tax breaks for higher-income earners, to the tune of $387 billion, in a bid to slash carbon emissions by 45 per cent within 11 years and boost spending on hospitals, dental care and universities. 

‘Labor’s energy policies, they don’t resonate in places like central Queensland, coal-rich Queensland,’ Mr Latham told Daily Mail Australia on Sunday.

‘Labor’s woes get worse with Albanese and Plibersek.’ 

Labor was decimated in Queensland, losing the Townsville-based seat of Herbert and the northern Brisbane seat of Longman.

The Opposition also suffered 11 per cent swings against it in the marginal National Party seat of Capricornia and Dawson, centred around Rockhampton and Mackay. 

It also lost Bass and Braddon in Tasmania and another in outer-western Sydney, Lindsay, as it failed to gain any new seats in Perth.

Labor even failed in Victoria, its strongest state, only picking up seats which were already notionally Labor following redistributions.

Mr Shorten appeared with his wife Chloe on Sunday, at Moonee Ponds in Melbourne, after telling supporters on Saturday night he would not be a contender for the Labor leadership

Mr Shorten appeared with his wife Chloe on Sunday, at Moonee Ponds in Melbourne, after telling supporters on Saturday night he would not be a contender for the Labor leadership

It struggled to win enough support to reclaim the seat of Chisholm in Melbourne’s south-east, even though the previous member Julia Banks had quit the Liberal Party and accused it of bullying women.

Mr Shorten appeared with his wife Chloe on Sunday, at Moonee Ponds in Melbourne, after telling supporters on Saturday night he would not be a contender for the Labor leadership.

‘Lots of lessons for Labor to learn from yesterday’s result, I know that my party will,’ Mr Shorten said.

‘I am now looking forward to spending some overdue time with my amazing wife, after all I am Chloe Shorten’s husband, and to see the kids.

When asked what went wrong Mr Shorten was straight to the point: ‘We didn’t get enough votes’. 

Mr Albanese, a former deputy prime minister, has declared he will run to become Labor's next leader by visiting a pub

Mr Albanese, a former deputy prime minister, has declared he will run to become Labor’s next leader by visiting a pub

Mr Albanese, a former deputy prime minister, has declared he will run to become Labor’s next leader by visiting a pub.

The 56-year-old member for Grayndler, in Sydney’s gentrified inner-west, highlighted his childhood growing up in housing commission. 

‘I grew up in a house with a single mum on an invalid pension,’ Mr Albanese told reporters at the Unity Hotel on Sunday in the wealthy suburb of Balmain.

‘Public housing down here in Campberdown. I know what it’s like to do it tough.

‘What you see is what you get with me. I’m a bit rough at the edges, but I think that Australians don’t want someone who just utters talking points.’

Mr Albanese is declaring his hand, six years after he lost a Labor leadership ballot to Bill Shorten, despite having more support from rank-and-file party members in the postal vote.

Under the party rules, introduced in 2013, Mr Shorten prevailed because he had more support from federal Labor MPs.

Ms Plibersek, who has been Mr Shorten's deputy since 2013, has signalled her intent for a run at the party's top job on Sunday morning during an interview on the ABC Insiders program

Ms Plibersek, who has been Mr Shorten’s deputy since 2013, has signalled her intent for a run at the party’s top job on Sunday morning during an interview on the ABC Insiders program

Making his leadership pitch in 2019, Mr Albanese held a media conference in Balmain, a birthplace of the Labor Party in 1891, and talked about his late mother Maryanne. He met his Italian biological father Carlo in 2009 shortly before he died.  

Ms Plibersek, who has been Mr Shorten’s deputy since 2013, has signalled her intent for a run at the party’s top job on Sunday morning during an interview on the ABC Insiders program.

‘I’ll talk to my colleagues today but of course I’m considering it,’ she told the program’s host Barrie Cassidy, a former Labor press secretary.

‘My determination is to ensure we are in the best place to win in three years time and that we continue to offer Australians real options.’

Two days before the election campaign, Ms Plibersek defended Labor’s controversial negative gearing policy, even though she owns four properties, including two in Sydney and one in Canberra.

The 49-year-old woman, married to senior NSW public servant Michael Coutts-Trotter, even has a rental investment property at Ljubljana, in Slovenia, where her parents hail from. 

Mr Latham said it was telling the NSW Right faction, which produced prime ministers Gough Whitlam and Paul Keating, didn’t have a viable candidate to take on Mr Albanese and Ms Plibersek. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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