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Fully grown white rhino gets spooked by a cardboard cutout of itself left by zookeepers

Adorable moment a fully grown white rhino gets spooked by a cardboard cutout of itself left by zookeepers

  • Rhino, named Nut, has a cardboard cut out animal placed in his enclosure
  • He goes to inspect it several times, but gets suddenly spooked and runs away
  • Video recorded at rhino enclosure in Songkhla Zoo, southern Thailand

This is the adorable moment a fully-grown rhino gets terrified after coming face-to-face with a cardboard cutout of itself.

The 35-year-old male white rhino, named Nut, had the unexpected visitor in his enclosure, and despite his best efforts didn’t know how to approach the invader.

The encounter was recorded at Songkhla Zoo in southern Thailand.

In the footage, Nut can be seen tentatively approaching the cardboard figure several times and looking at it nervously.

But the zoo keepers appear to have done such a good job creating the cutout that Nut is mythed as to whether it poses a threat or not.

Unsure of himself, Nut quickly turns on its heels and either sprints away or edges backwards anxiously each time.

In the footage, Nut can be seen tentatively approaching the cardboard cutout several times and look at it nervously

But the zoo keepers appear to have done such a good job creating the cutout that Nut is mythed as to whether it poses a threat or not

But the zoo keepers appear to have done such a good job creating the cutout that Nut is mythed as to whether it poses a threat or not

Zookeepers did the experiment to observe Nut’s behaviour and interactions in celebration of World Rhino Day.

The annual global event celebrates the world’s five rhinoceros species and raises awareness of their declining numbers and challenges in the wild.

Poachers targeting rhinos for their horn are one of the biggest threats to the survival of the creatures in the wild.

The Chinese use rhino horn in their traditional medicines by crushing it and mixing it with boiling water.

Zookeepers did the experiment to observe Nut's behaviour and interactions in celebration of World Rhino Day

Zookeepers did the experiment to observe Nut’s behaviour and interactions in celebration of World Rhino Day

However, once the rhino’s horn has been sawn off, they are often left to bleed to death in the wild.

Songkhla Zoo first opened its doors to the public in 1998 as part of the government’s previous plan to have a zoo in every region of the country, controlled by the Zoological Park Organization.

Separate enclosures have been created for camels, giraffes, bears, tigers, musks, and birds such as parrots, macaws, and flamingos.            

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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