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Fury as second home-owners send luggage by courier to avoid being stopped by police

Second home-owners flouting the coronavirus lockdown are posting their luggage through couriers in an attempt to avoid police. 

Rural crime teams have reported investigating delivery vans carrying suitcases filled with clothes through police checkpoints, so that if families are stopped enroute they will not be found with them.

It comes as furious villagers have demanded second home owners leave small communities which have been ‘inundated’ since the coronavirus lockdown.

Pictures have today showed officers continuing to crack down on rule breakers, including stopping campervans on the road in Blackburn, West Lothian. 

Road blocks have been set up on popular routes to North Wales to keep tourists and irregular residents away by checking their cars.

Rural crime teams have reported investigating delivery vans carrying suitcases filled with clothes through police checkpoints, so that if families are stopped enroute they will not be found with them

Police stop cars at check point in Rhos on Sea, North Wales yesterday

Police stop cars at check point in Rhos on Sea, North Wales yesterday

But taking to social media, the force revealed they have been looking into reports of couriers taking their luggage ahead of them.

‘Unbelievably we are investigating reports that people are sending their suitcases via courier with their clothes to holiday homes in Wales!’ said the Rural Crime Team.

‘So if they get stopped enroute they are not found with them Surely people aren’t that selfish and cunning…are they? #StayHomeSaveLives.’

One person replied to the tweet, saying: ‘We’ve seen a number of suitcases through our delivery system Recently. It’s not a coincidence I’m sure.’ 

The seafront road and parking at West Bay in Dorset was closed to prevent visitors on a hot day during the coronavirus pandemic lockdown over the Easter Weekend

The seafront road and parking at West Bay in Dorset was closed to prevent visitors on a hot day during the coronavirus pandemic lockdown over the Easter Weekend

Pictures have today showed officers continuing to crack down on rule breakers, including stopping campervans on the road in Blackburn, West Lothian

Pictures have today showed officers continuing to crack down on rule breakers, including stopping campervans on the road in Blackburn, West Lothian

The Daily Post reported that they were approached by a local man who made the initial claims.

‘This sums up the arrogance of a portion of second home owners,’ he said.

‘A delivery driver said he was very busy today delivering suitcases to Aberdyfi.

‘He (the driver) couldn’t understand it when he left his depot this morning and then clicked as he delivered the first pair of five suitcase deliveries… to second homes.’ 

North Wales Police has said it is now investigating the matter.

Second home owners could receive £10,000 crisis grant due to loophole in government’s business bailout fund

Second home owners could take advantage of a loophole in the Government’s coronavirus aid scheme to claim thousands in grant money, it has been reported.

A lack of scrutiny by councils could put £10,000 into the hands of well-off property owners for each house they own.

As part of the Treasury’s rescue package during the coronavirus lockdown, Chancellor Rishi Sunak scrapped business rates for all properties in the leisure and hospitality sector.

And for those who qualify, they will also be eligible for a £10,000 grant paid to them through the local council.

Second home owners could take advantage of a loophole in the Government’s coronavirus aid scheme to claim thousands in grant money, it has been reported (stock photo)

Second home owners could take advantage of a loophole in the Government’s coronavirus aid scheme to claim thousands in grant money, it has been reported (stock photo)

But while some rely on holiday home lettings for their livelihoods, well-off individuals with large property portfolios can also make claims. 

There are approximately 1.9 million homes that are buy-to-let properties in the UK, according to the Resolution Foundation. 

If they are available for let at least 140 days a year, they can be assessed for business rates and most are exempt from paying anything.

The concern is that rich property owners may also access the £10,000 Government grant designed to support small businesses struggling to survive the impact of the virus, even if the home is not a significant source of income.

But while some rely on holiday home lettings for their livelihoods, well-off individuals with large property portfolios can also make claims (stock photo)

But while some rely on holiday home lettings for their livelihoods, well-off individuals with large property portfolios can also make claims (stock photo)

The Government has announced that local councils will be in charge of implementing the scheme, and have some powers to withhold or recover grants in some cases.

An HM Treasury Spokesperson said: ‘It’s only right that business owners that run their second home as a legitimate business and who are unable to generate revenue can access the additional small business grant scheme just like any other eligible small business.’ 

Lib Dem MP Layla Moran said: ‘The idea that, at a time like this anyone might take advantage of support measures when they do not need them is appalling.

‘No doubt some will access this help because they are genuinely running a small business and rely on this income, but we have to make sure that is always the case.’

Locals in seaside towns and villages as Londoners and people living in big cities flocked to their second homes to escape the virus, drawing the ire of locals. 

This comes amid anger in seaside towns and villages as Londoners and people living in big cities flocked to their second homes to escape the virus, drawing the ire of locals

This comes amid anger in seaside towns and villages as Londoners and people living in big cities flocked to their second homes to escape the virus, drawing the ire of locals

Now, furious locals in St Ives, Cornwall have scrawled messages on the beach demanding second home owners leave.

An even more furious sign has appeared in Bala, north Wales, which says ‘Go home rats’.

It come as the government urged people not to head to the countryside or to holiday homes, with fears that they could be spreading the virus throughout the nation.

However, despite their pleas, government commands and Boris Johnson imposing a UK-wide lockdown, second homers are remaining defiant and continuing to flock to the countryside in their droves.  

Now, furious locals in St Ives, Cornwall have scrawled messages on the beach demanding second home owners leave.

Now, furious locals in St Ives, Cornwall have scrawled messages on the beach demanding second home owners leave. 

Residents of St Ives in Cornwall scrawled a series of messages into the sand on the beach demanding that tourists go home. 

Two messages read ‘Locals only’, while another said ‘Tourists please go home’. 

In Bala, second home owners were compared to rats in one sign while another message, scrawled on the side of a car, read ‘Go home idiots’.

Signs also appeared on a roundabout in Porthcawl, south Wales asking people to turn around.

Meanwhile, a roadside sign in Pembrokeshire also urged non-locals to go home, while a sign in north Wales said: ‘Snowdonia is closed. F*** off home!’ 

This sign, put up by local residents, has appeared in Bala, north Wales, and it reads 'Go home rats'

This sign, put up by local residents, has appeared in Bala, north Wales, and it reads ‘Go home rats’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk