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Get ready to fry! UK summers are to hit 104°F within the decade, forecasters warn

Scorching summers of 104°F (40°C) will become the UK’s new ‘normal’ by the end of the century, forecasters from the Met Office have warned.

The alarming prediction comes as experts warned that temperature and rainfall records are being smashed at a ‘shocking’ rate in Britain.

All of the UK’s top ten warmest years on record since 1884 have occurred in the last two decades, with central England now warmer than in the last three centuries.

Furthermore, the last three decades have been 1.6°F (0.9°C) warmer than the three decades that preceded them. Warming trends are evident across the while UK.

The researchers have expressed fear that the rate of global warming is spiralling out of control, saying that ‘climate change is happening and it’s happening now’. 

Scorching summers of 40°C (104°F) will become the UK’s new ‘normal’ by the end of the century, forecasters have warned. Pictured: Lyme Regis in Dorset on Tuesday

Scientists fear the rate of global warming is spiralling out of control, saying that ' climate change is happening and it's happening now'. Pictured: key findings of the report

Scientists fear the rate of global warming is spiralling out of control, saying that ‘ climate change is happening and it’s happening now’. Pictured: key findings of the report

All of the UK's top ten warmest years on record since 1884 have occurred in the last two decades, with central England now warmer than in the last three centuries. Pictured: seasonal average temperature anomalies in 2020 (expressed in °C relative to 1981–2010 average)

All of the UK’s top ten warmest years on record since 1884 have occurred in the last two decades, with central England now warmer than in the last three centuries. Pictured: seasonal average temperature anomalies in 2020 (expressed in °C relative to 1981–2010 average)

LIGHTNING FIRE AT HOSPITAL 

A hospital and house were set on fire by lightning yesterday as more dramatic weather hit the North.

Around 70 people were evacuated from Trafford General Hospital in Manchester due to a ‘large fire’ that broke out during a storm.

And firefighters battled a blaze at a house in Liverpool which was also reportedly struck by lightning.

Northamptonshire was hit by hail storms which were so heavy they set off car alarms. The showers are set to continue today with warnings of flooding and transport disruption.

‘2020 was another notable year for the UK climate, with records broken for daily rainfall and monthly sunshine hours,’ said Met Office climate scientist and report author Mike Kendon.

‘Average temperatures for the UK continue to climb, with nearly a degree of warming when comparing the most recent 30 years with the preceding 30-year period.

‘Last year saw some significant weather extremes including severe flooding from heavy rainfall in February and a major heatwave in early August.’

The hottest temperature ever recorded in the UK stands at 101.6°F (38.7°C) in Cambridge in 2019.

But the jump up to 104°F (40°C) temperatures could come within the decade and become a regular occurrence every three to four years by the end of the century, the team said.

Data from the annual State Of The UK Climate report showed that last year was the third warmest, fifth wettest and eighth sunniest year on record — the first year known to fall into the top ten in all three categories.

Meanwhile, the average winter temperature last year was 5.3°C (41.5°F) — up 1.6°C on the 1981–2010 average.

This increase will spark fears among health experts about the long-term impacts of the weather. A heatwave last August recorded temperatures above 34°C (93.2°F) for six days, claiming 1,700 lives.

Professor Liz Bentley, chief executive of the Royal Meteorological Society, said that the temperature in the UK has already increased by 2.16°F (1.2°C) and is likely to rise a further 0.54°F (0.3°C) in the coming years.

Heatwaves, she added, ‘are just going to become much more intense.’

‘We’re likely to see 40°C in the UK although we have never seen those kinds of temperatures [before].

‘That’s not just going to become something that we see once or twice — it’ll start to become something that we see on a much more regular basis.’ 

When comparing 1991-2020 temperatures with those from 1961-1990, the greatest warming in the UK can be seen in East Anglia and the east Midlands, where increases have exceeded 1.8°F (1°C).

In contrast, the areas of the UK which have seen the least warming have been the western coastal fringes and parts of Northern Ireland and Scotland.

THE UNITED KINGDOM’S CLIMATE EXTREMES IN 2020 
Extreme Observation Date Station Location
Highest daily maximum temperature
(09–09 GMT)
100.0°F
(37.8°C)
Jul. 31 Heathrow, Greater London
Joint lowest daily minimum temperature
(09–09 GMT)
13.64°F
(-10.2°C)
Feb. 13
Dec. 30
Braemar, Aberdeenshire
Dalwhinnie, Inverness-shire
Lowest daily maximum temperature
(09–09 GMT)
28.6°F
(-1.9°C)
Dec. 30 Carlisle, Cumbria
Highest daily minimum temperature
(09–09 GMT)
72.1°F
(22.3°C)
Aug. 08 Langdon Bay, Kent
Lowest grass minimum temperature
(09–09 GMT)
9.14°F
(-12.7°C)
Dec. 31 Aboyne, Aberdeenshire
Highest daily rainfall
(09–09 GMT)
9.44 inches
23.99 cm
Aug. 16 East Wretham, Norfolk
Greatest snow depth
(09 GMT)
9.06 inches
(23 cm)
Feb. 24 Copley, County Durham
Highest daily sunshine 16.8hr Jun. 16 Fair Isle, Shetland
Highest gust speed 92Kt 106mph Dec. 27 Needles Old Battery, Isle of Wight
Highest gust speed (mountain) 115Kt 132mph Feb. 03 Cairngorm Summit, Inverness-shire
The jump to 40C could come within the decade and become a regular occurrence every three to four years by the end of the century

The jump to 40C could come within the decade and become a regular occurrence every three to four years by the end of the century

When comparing 1991-2020 temperatures with those from 1961-1990, the greatest warming in the UK can be seen in East Anglia and the east Midlands, where increases have exceeded 1.8°F (1°C). Pictured: percentage sunshine anomalies for the UK in 2020 relative to 1981–2010

When comparing 1991-2020 temperatures with those from 1961-1990, the greatest warming in the UK can be seen in East Anglia and the east Midlands, where increases have exceeded 1.8°F (1°C). Pictured: percentage sunshine anomalies for the UK in 2020 relative to 1981–2010

Alongside the trend towards increasing temperatures, the UK has been on average around 6 per cent wetter over the last 30 years than in the three decades before that, with six of the ten wettest years on record occurring since 1998.

The UK’s wettest February on record struck in 2020, during which the country was battered by storms Ciara and Dennis in rapid succession, bringing devastating flooding to many homes and businesses. 

In fact, most of the UK received more than twice the usual long-term average rainfall that month, with increases as high as 400 per cent seen in the Pennines and 300 per cent across broad swathes of the north and west.

Alongside 2020 providing the wettest recorded February, the last 12 years also saw the wettest April (2012), June (also 2012), November (2009) and December (2015).

Alongside the trend towards increasing temperatures, the UK has been on average around 6 per cent wetter over the last 30 years than in the three decades before that, with six of the ten wettest years on record occurring since 1998. Pictured: percentage rainfall anomalies in 2020

Alongside the trend towards increasing temperatures, the UK has been on average around 6 per cent wetter over the last 30 years than in the three decades before that, with six of the ten wettest years on record occurring since 1998. Pictured: percentage rainfall anomalies in 2020

According to Dr Kendon the figures showed that the ‘baseline of our climate’ is changing and indicated a new normal for the UK.

He also warned of the impact of man-made global warming, saying its effects will last ‘for a very, very long time’.

The full findings of the ‘State of the UK Climate 2020’ study were published in the Royal Meteorological Society’s International Journal of Climatology.  

CLIMATE CHANGE HAS PASSED THE POINT OF NO RETURN, EXPERTS FEAR, WEEKS AFTER RECORD HEATWAVES SCORCH THE US

Earth’s ‘vital signs’ have taken a turn for the worse, scientists fear, with climate change appearing to have pushed us past various ‘tipping points’ from which there is no return.

Experts led from the Oregon State University analysed 31 key environmental parameters, concluding that 16 have recently set worrying new records.

Among these are the extent of ocean acidification, the scale of global deforestation and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

Many of these parameters show overall increasing trends even in the face of the downturns seen in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The new study builds on previous findings first published in 2019.

Experts led from the Oregon State University analysed 31 key environmental parameters (some of which are pictured above) — concluding that 16 have recently set worrying new records

 Experts led from the Oregon State University analysed 31 key environmental parameters (some of which are pictured above) — concluding that 16 have recently set worrying new records

‘There is growing evidence we are getting close to or have already gone beyond tipping points associated with important parts of the Earth system,’ said paper author and Oregon State ecologist William Ripple.

Systems affected, he said, include ‘warm-water coral reefs, the Amazon rainforest and the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets.’

According to the team, the continued worsening in many of the key indicators ‘largely reflect the consequences of unrelenting business as usual’. 

To illustrate their point, they highlighted the surge in various types of climate-related disasters since 2019 — including floods, heatwaves and ‘extraordinary storms and wildfires.’

When the researchers’ published their original paper in 2019, they also presented a declaration of a climate emergency — which was signed at the time by some 11,000 scientists from 153 different countries.

Since then, another 3,000 experts have put their name to the declaration. 

The new study builds on previous findings first published in 2019. Pictured: the changes in some of the 31 key environmental parameters analysed by the team

 The new study builds on previous findings first published in 2019. Pictured: the changes in some of the 31 key environmental parameters analysed by the team

Last month, NASA said that global air pollution rates had fallen by 15 per cent due to global COVID-19 lockdowns resulting in consumers reducing their carbon footprints. 

In fact, most US states saw their emissions cut down by 25 per cent — and some Asian cities even saw their emissions lowered by half. 

Despite these improvements, various troubling signs still emerged in 2020.

In January, experts from the World Meteorological Organization said that 2020 was one of the three hottest years on record, with global temperatures up 2.3°F (1.3°C) on pre-industrial levels. 

The five hottest years on record have all occurred since 2015. 

Given this, the increase in climate disasters and the continued rise in carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide levels — all of which have set new records in both 2020 and 2021 — immediate action needs to be taken, experts said.

‘Priorities need to shift toward immediate, drastic reductions in greenhouse gases, especially methane,’ said paper author and environmental data scientist Christopher Wolf, also of the Oregon State University.

‘We also need to stop treating the climate emergency as a stand-alone issue — global heating is not the sole symptom of our stressed Earth system,’ added Professor Ripple. 

‘Policies to combat the climate crisis or any other symptoms should address their root cause: human overexploitation of the planet.’

In April 2021, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations reached 416 parts per million, the highest ever recorded, the team noted. 

Other findings from the study include that there are now more than 4 billion ruminant livestock in the world — with an equivalent mass of more than all the planet’s humans and wild animals.

Methane emissions released from cattle are a primary source of greenhouse gases. For this reason, scientists are tracking emissions from cattle in an to attempt to breed versions with fewer emissions. 

The team also found that the deforestation rates in Brazilian Amazon reached a 12-year high in 2020, with the loss of a total of some 1.11 million hectares.

Ocean acidification is also near an all-time high, threatening coral reefs.

A few bright spots include fossil fuel subsidies continuing to decline and the record high in institutions divesting themselves from fossil fuels. 

The scientists said that climate actions taken by governments around the world need to focus on social justice as to reduce inequality.

Authorities should make available financing for climate change mitigation efforts, they added, alongside ensuring climate education forms a part of school curricula.

‘The carbon price needs to be linked to a socially just fund to finance climate mitigation and adaptation policies in the developing world,’ Professor Ripple commented.

‘We need to quickly change how we’re doing things, and new climate policies should be part of COVID-19 recovery plans wherever possible.’

‘It’s time for us to join together as a global community with a shared sense of cooperation, urgency and equity.’

The full findings of the new study were published in the journal BioScience.

Met Office issues weather warnings for heavy rain and wind today and tomorrow after hailstones an inch wide battered Britain and lightning strikes set hospital and house ablaze

The Met Office is warning of further devastation amid more heavy rain and wind today after giant hailstones battered Britain and lightning strikes set buildings on fire in the freak summer storms.

Gale force winds will hammer England’s south-west coast today, while showers and flooding will cause havoc in the north-west.

Yellow warnings are in place, with gusts of up to 65mph predicted, while much of Scotland is also set to experience more choppy weather.

Meteorologist Anne Shuttleworth said ‘isolated’ showers and thundery weather would continue over the next few days after the recent downpours.

The violent weather comes after hailstones estimated to be the size of peas landed on a Earls Barton in Northampton yesterday.

Stormy weather also caused havoc in Greater Manchester as a lightning hit Trafford General Hospital and set the rood ablaze, which resulted in a number of patients being evacuated to safety.

Firefighters were called to the blaze on the roof of a building at the Manchester hospital at 2.20pm yesterday.

They took nearly hours to get the blaze under control, finally extinguishing it at 4.15pm. 

In a statement, Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service said: ‘Just after 2.20pm this afternoon, seven fire engines were called to reports of a fire at a building on Moorside Road in Flixton.

‘Crews were quickly on the scene, joined by the aerial ladder platform from Manchester Central fire station, and firefighters wearing breathing apparatus are currently using two hose reels and a jet to tackle a fire involving the roof of a two-storey building.

Today's weather warnings

Friday's weather warnings

Yellow warnings are in place today (left) and Friday (right), with gusts of up to 65mph predicted, while much of Scotland is also set to experience more choppy weather

The shocking photographs were captured in Northampton as erratic conditions on Wednesday follow a week of downpours across the country with both amber and yellow weather warnings in place

The shocking photographs were captured in Northampton as erratic conditions on Wednesday follow a week of downpours across the country with both amber and yellow weather warnings in place

Witnesses said the blaze broke out yesterday after the hospital on Moorside road was struck by lightning. Pictured, the scene which shows smoke bellowing out of the top of the hospital

Witnesses said the blaze broke out yesterday after the hospital on Moorside road was struck by lightning. Pictured, the scene which shows smoke bellowing out of the top of the hospital

Shoppers take cover under an umbrella as heavy rain falls on Oxford Street in central London

Shoppers take cover under an umbrella as heavy rain falls on Oxford Street in central London

Heavy rain, lightning and hail 'the size of garden peas' have caused disruption across the UK, with the Met Office predicting further stormy weather to come

Heavy rain, lightning and hail ‘the size of garden peas’ have caused disruption across the UK, with the Met Office predicting further stormy weather to come

Firefighters were called to the blaze on the roof of a building at the Manchester hospital at 2.20pm on Wednesday afternoon

Firefighters were called to the blaze on the roof of a building at the Manchester hospital at 2.20pm on Wednesday afternoon

Crews are at the fire on Arncliffe Road, Halewood, where the roof of a house caught alight in the extreme weather

Crews are at the fire on Arncliffe Road, Halewood, where the roof of a house caught alight in the extreme weather

In a statement, Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service said: 'Just after 2.20pm this afternoon, seven fire engines were called to reports of a fire at a building on Moorside Road in Flixton'

In a statement, Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service said: ‘Just after 2.20pm this afternoon, seven fire engines were called to reports of a fire at a building on Moorside Road in Flixton’

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust confirmed the hospital was struck by lightning which caused a fire in an area of the roof.

It added that patients and staff had been safely evacuated.

A total of 66 patients from ward and clinical areas were safely evacuated to other parts of the hospital.

The Minor Injuries Unit is expected to reopen this morning and outpatient appointments will go ahead as planned.

GMFRS area manager Carlos Meakin told reporters that significant damage had been caused to the roof, with the timbers ‘pretty much burnt through’. 

It comes as a house in Halewood, Merseyside, caught alight after also being struck by lightning.

Firefighters are currently fighting the house fire on Arncliffe Road.

A spokesperson for Merseyside Fire and Rescue Services said all occupants of the house have been accounted for but the incident is ongoing.

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust confirmed the hospital was struck by lightning which caused a fire in an area of the roof

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust confirmed the hospital was struck by lightning which caused a fire in an area of the roof

A witness who lives in nearby flats said she was on the fourth floor and saw the ‘massive flash’ of lightning that hit the house.

She told the Liverpool Echo: ‘Basically I was sitting in the flat, on the fourth floor just over the road, and thunder and lightning was going on then next minute there was a massive flash and bang.

‘I said “what the hell is that?”. I knew it wasn’t normal lightning because it was like an explosion. It was an explosive bang. I thought it was an explosion.

‘Then we seen through the window the smoke pouring out of the house.’

The woman, who didn’t want to be named, said that the damage is visible and is mainly on the roof. She added: ‘I can see the damage from binoculars, it’s all on the roof. It looks like the lightning stuck the roof and went down through the house.

Pictured, the fire on Arncliffe Road, Halewood, where the roof of the house is alight following a lightning strike. A spokesman has said all occupants of the house have been accounted for

Pictured, the fire on Arncliffe Road, Halewood, where the roof of the house is alight following a lightning strike. A spokesman has said all occupants of the house have been accounted for

A Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service spokesperson said: 'Firefighters wearing breathing apparatus are using hose reel jets to extinguish the fire. The combined platform ladder is being used to fight the fire from above'

A Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service spokesperson said: ‘Firefighters wearing breathing apparatus are using hose reel jets to extinguish the fire. The combined platform ladder is being used to fight the fire from above’

Pictured, photographs taken in a Stoke street of hailstone pouring down as extreme weather hits certain parts of the UK

Pictured, photographs taken in a Stoke street of hailstone pouring down as extreme weather hits certain parts of the UK

‘I thought it might even be a gas explosion at first because the bang was terrible. I just thought I hope everyone is ok.’

A Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service spokesperson said: ‘Firefighters wearing breathing apparatus are using hose reel jets to extinguish the fire. The combined platform ladder is being used to fight the fire from above.

‘A structural engineer has been requested to attend the incident.’ 

Yesterday, Britain faced flash floods as forecasters warned of more than three inches of rain and a ‘danger to life’. 

Thunderstorms and torrential downpours swept across much of the country today with the Met Office warning the rain could be so heavy that it might spark power cuts and leave some communities cut off.

Many areas of northern England and Scotland were under a ‘yellow’ weather warning yesterday with a more severe ‘amber’ warning in place for the Highlands amid fears over ‘fast flowing or deep floodwater’.

Up to 3.1in (80mm) was expected to fall in the worst-hit areas and heavy showers will continue throughout this week, but meteorologists added that sunny spells will break through the gloom at times. 

Heavy rain pounds central London as extreme weather continues following mass flooding across parts of the capital over the weekend

Heavy rain pounds central London as extreme weather continues following mass flooding across parts of the capital over the weekend

Over the past few weeks, rain has battered the UK, particularly in London where areas including Walthamstow, Woodford and Stepney Green have seen severe flooding

Over the past few weeks, rain has battered the UK, particularly in London where areas including Walthamstow, Woodford and Stepney Green have seen severe flooding

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said yesterday that following a meeting with the Environment Agency, London's boroughs and other key partners, he will be doing all that he can to tackle flooding and climate change

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said yesterday that following a meeting with the Environment Agency, London’s boroughs and other key partners, he will be doing all that he can to tackle flooding and climate change

Britain today faced flash floods as forecasters warned of more than three inches of rain and a 'danger to life'

Britain today faced flash floods as forecasters warned of more than three inches of rain and a ‘danger to life’

People stand under an umbrella as they are caught in torrential downpours on Whitehall in Westminster yesterday

People stand under an umbrella as they are caught in torrential downpours on Whitehall in Westminster yesterday

Pedestrians are caught in heavy downpours in Westminster yesterday after much of the UK was placed under a weather warning

Pedestrians are caught in heavy downpours in Westminster yesterday after much of the UK was placed under a weather warning

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency has imposed 15 flood alerts for areas including Dundee, Aberdeenshire and Fife, while England’s Environment Agency put out one alert on the Isle of Wight.

Met Office chief meteorologist Steve Willington said: ‘Yellow warnings are in place across much of the UK, away from the south, for thunderstorms and heavy rain over the coming days. Scotland, however, is expected to see some of the heaviest rain and amber warnings for thunderstorms and also rain have been issued here.’

Stephen Dixon, a Met Office spokesman, said: ‘The rain can cause potential flooding and travel disruption. There is the potential for 80mm to 100mm over 24 hours, but more likely 60mm more widely across that amber area.

‘There can possibly be lightning and hail in areas of Scotland. Not everywhere within the warning areas will see heavy rain, rainfall amounts will vary from place to place. The rainfall could lead to some surface water flooding and disruption before it eases and moves south through Thursday.’ 

A pedestrian jumps over a puddle as they cross the road during heavy rain in London yesterday afternoon

A pedestrian jumps over a puddle as they cross the road during heavy rain in London yesterday afternoon

People shelter under umbrellas during heavy torrential downpours in Westminster

People shelter under umbrellas during heavy torrential downpours in Westminster 

People jump over a puddle as they cross the road during torrential downpours in Central London

People jump over a puddle as they cross the road during torrential downpours in Central London 

Flash flooding on Ormskirk Road in Aintree, Merseyside, as the Met Office issued weather warnings across Britain

Flash flooding on Ormskirk Road in Aintree, Merseyside, as the Met Office issued weather warnings across Britain

Holidaymakers enjoy warm sunny spells on the beach at the seaside resort of Lyme Regis

Holidaymakers enjoy warm sunny spells on the beach at the seaside resort of Lyme Regis

Holidaymakers next to the harbour get caught in a heavy rain shower at the seaside resort of West Bay in Dorset on a day of sunshine, showers and strong gusty winds

Holidaymakers next to the harbour get caught in a heavy rain shower at the seaside resort of West Bay in Dorset on a day of sunshine, showers and strong gusty winds

Up to 3.1in (80mm) is expected to fall in the worst-hit areas and heavy showers will continue throughout this week, but meteorologists added that sunny spells will break through the gloom at times

Up to 3.1in (80mm) is expected to fall in the worst-hit areas and heavy showers will continue throughout this week, but meteorologists added that sunny spells will break through the gloom at times

On the roads, the RAC and Highways England have advised drivers to be cautious in the rain. They warned motorists to leave a larger gap than normal between the car in front of them when stopping

On the roads, the RAC and Highways England have advised drivers to be cautious in the rain. They warned motorists to leave a larger gap than normal between the car in front of them when stopping

Over the past few weeks, rain has battered the UK, particularly in London where areas including Walthamstow, Woodford and Stepney Green have seen severe flooding.

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said yesterday that following a meeting with the Environment Agency, London’s boroughs and other key partners, he will be doing all that he can to tackle flooding and climate change.

He said: ‘Through the new London Plan, we’re now reducing the risk of surface water flooding with every new development, but whether it’s prioritising more green spaces to help absorb excess water or investing more in upgrading our drainage and sewer infrastructure, dealing with the impacts of climate change is something that cannot wait a day longer.’

On the roads, the RAC and Highways England have advised drivers to be cautious in the rain. They warned motorists to leave a larger gap than normal between the car in front of them when stopping.

Three sailors are rescued after their yacht is battered by 100mph gusts and rough seas during thunderstorm 

Three sailors were rescued after their yacht was battered by 100mph gusts and rough seas during a thunderstorm, leaving two with head injuries.

One member of the crew suffered a serious head injury and another had a minor wound onboard the 37ft sailing catamaran after it was hit by an 87-knot gust off the West Sussex coast.

Damage to the vessel left the sailors without navigation and torn sails after getting caught in a thunderstorm off the Selsey Bill near Bognor Regis.

Lifeboats were dispatched at 2.52am yesterday morning (Mon) after the boat reported all navigation aids had been lost and its sails and rigging had been ripped.

An all-weather lifeboat with a volunteer crew headed towards the yacht, which had three people on board and was five nautical miles southeast of Selsey Bill.

While on the way, it was reported that one of the crew members sustained a minor head injury.

The lifeboat arrived at 3.19am and the RNLI volunteers decided to tow the vessel to Chichester Harbour.

Half an hour later the skipper of the yacht said another crewman suffered a serious head injury, so the coxswain decided to drop the tow immediately and transfer a casualty care trained lifeboat crewman to the yacht to assess the injury.

Once the lifeboat crewman was aboard the yacht the injured crewman was checked and the injury was dressed. The stricken vessel was safely back at the harbour just before 6am.

A spokesman for the RNLI Selsey Lifeboat Station said: ‘The 37ft sailing catamaran with three persons on board reported to UK Coastguards that they had lost all navigation aids, had ripped sails and rigging after experiencing strong winds including an 87-knot gust – approximately 100mph – and rough seas during a thunderstorm in a position 5 nautical miles southeast of Selsey Bill.

‘There was no requirement for immediate evacuation, so the tow was established once again at 4.02am and a course set for Chichester harbour with the casualty with the head injury being monitored at all times and the lifeboat requested an ambulance meet them on arrival at the harbour.

‘At 5.10am the Chichester harbour entrance was reached, and the tow continued into the harbour. At 5.50am the vessel was safely berthed alongside at Sparkes marina with the assistance of Hayling Coastguard rescue team.’

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