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Giant crater is left in a German field after a suspected WWII device exploded

Ticking time bomb: Giant crater is left in a German field after a suspected WWII device exploded after a delayed timer finally eroded

  • Blast from unexploded bomb left a 33-foot-wide crater in a field near Limburg
  • Residents hear a loud explosion and felt the blast in the small hours of Sunday 
  • Bombs dropped by Allied air forces in World War Two are still being discovered   

A crater has appeared in a field in central Germany, apparently caused by a Second World War bomb exploding in the middle of the night.

Police said on Monday that the crater was discovered on Sunday afternoon near Limburg and there was no indication it was caused by farm machinery or other tools.

Residents reported having heard a loud explosion and felt a blast at 3:52 am on Sunday.

An aerial view of the 33-foot-wide (10-metre) crater left in a field near Limburg, Germany, when an unexplded WWII bomb went off on Sunday

No one was hurt. News agency dpa reported that police said the shape of the crater, among other factors, led explosives clearance experts to confirm it was created by a bomb.

The crater is 33 feet (10 metres) wide and 13 feet (four metres) deep.

‘The crater was examined on Monday by an explosive ordnance clearance service to find possible fragments,’ a police spokesman told AFP.

‘The area was used for target practice during the Second World War,’ he added.

The 33-foot-wide, 10-foot-deep (10 metres by 3 metres) crater left by the detination of a WWII bomb in a farmer's field near Limburg, Germany on Sunday

The 33-foot-wide, 10-foot-deep (10 metres by 3 metres) crater left by the detination of a WWII bomb in a farmer’s field near Limburg, Germany on Sunday

A bomb disposal service spokesman said it was ‘highly possible’ WW II ordnance was involved.

A local government spokesman in the nearby city of Darmstadt told German daily Bild it was believed the bomb had a chemical-based delayed timer which could have finally eroded. 

Nearly 75 years after the end of war, Germany remains littered with unexploded ordnance, a legacy of the Allied bombing campaign against Nazi Germany.

Another aerial view of the crater left by the suspected ditonation of an WWII bomb in a German farmer's field

Another aerial view of the crater left by the suspected ditonation of an WWII bomb in a German farmer’s field

Earlier this month, a 100-kilo (220-pound) US bomb from the war, discovered during building work near a shopping complex, was defused in central Berlin after the evacuation of around 3,000 people.

According to experts, 10 percent of the millions of bombs dropped on Germany during the conflict did not explode.

The discovery of a German WWII bomb caused the evacuation of Kingston University campus in southwest London on May 23 – the day of the European Parliament elections. 

Another aerial vierw of the crater left after a chemical delay fuse finally eroded after more than 74 years buried in the field.

Another aerial vierw of the crater left after a chemical delay fuse finally eroded after more than 74 years buried in the field.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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