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Gina Rinehart slams climate change ‘propaganda’ in recorded speech for Perth schoolgirls

Australia’s richest woman has slammed climate change ‘propaganda’ and the spending of taxpayers dollars on reducing carbon in a speech to students at her former private school.

Mining magnate Gina Rinehart pre-recorded a keynote address to students at Perth’s St Hilda’s Anglican School for Girls in honour of its 125th anniversary.

The billionaire worth $31billion didn’t hold back on her stance on climate change and urged the next generation to do their own research, ask questions and to always search for the facts.

It follows her recent warning that Australia is on the same track as Sri Lanka and Argentina in falling from prosperity to poverty due to a big-spending, regulation-heavy government.

St Hilda’s Anglican School students only heard five minutes of Ms Rinehart’s address played at an anniversary assembly, where she fondly looked back on her time at the school which was also attended by four generations of her family, including her mum Hope.

She has since shared the unedited 16 minute address on her website, where she urges students to ask teachers questions while doing their own research into which came first, global warming, or an increase in carbon. 

Gina Rinehart (pictured at State Dinner at The White House honoring Australian PM Scott Morrison in 2019) has urged girls to do their own research, ask questions and to always search for the facts

‘It should help to point to four independent facts, which all come to the same conclusion, independently, including, what has been found in the geological record of ice, ocean floors, and separately chemistry principles,’ Ms Rinehart said. 

‘If these four independent facts all support, global warming comes first, not increases in carbon, the rationale would ask, why does the media in general and those they influence, now call for reducing carbon? 

‘Why should taxpayers’ money be spent towards reducing carbon? The higher debt our government racks up, the higher your taxes will be forced to be.’

Ms Rinehart also slammed government for supporting grants on one side of the argument, making it less beneficial to consider natural influences on climate and other scientific facts.

She ended her climate change tirade with a plea to always search for the facts, even it’s not considered popular.

‘Please be very careful about information spread on emotional basis, or tied to money, or egos, or power-seekers,’ she warned. 

‘Facts may not be popular, but that shouldn’t mean, they should be overlooked.’

The mining magnate recorded a powerful address for students at her former school, most of which they didn't get to see

The mining magnate recorded a powerful address for students at her former school, most of which they didn’t get to see

Ms Rinehart was a boarding student at Perth, St Hilda's Anglican School for Girls, attended by fourth generations of her family

Ms Rinehart was a boarding student at Perth, St Hilda’s Anglican School for Girls, attended by fourth generations of her family

Fees to attend the exclusive girls school in Perth range from $17,786 a year for kindergarten and to $27,120 for Year 12.

Ms Rinehart looked back fondly of her time at St Hilda’s Anglican, despite the ‘awful’ boarding school food.

‘I’m grateful that I had a real education, not one based on propaganda, but facts, and rationale,’ she said.

‘I continue to believe that facts and rationale should provide the basis for education, it concerns me greatly that the current generation of school leavers and attendees, too often miss such important basics, as too often propaganda erodes these critical foundations.’

She also paid tribute to Australian pioneer women before finally ending her address with quotes from former UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher as ‘we sure need better leadership in our country.’

Ms Rinehart fears Australia is on the same track as Sri Lanka and Argentina in falling from prosperity to poverty due to a big-spending, regulation-heavy government. Pictured is Sydney

Ms Rinehart fears Australia is on the same track as Sri Lanka and Argentina in falling from prosperity to poverty due to a big-spending, regulation-heavy government. Pictured is Sydney

Rare missive: Mining magnate Gina Rinehart - seen at the Magic Millions on the Gold Coast last year - has penned an essay detailing her thoughts on the state of Australia

Rare missive: Mining magnate Gina Rinehart – seen at the Magic Millions on the Gold Coast last year – has penned an essay detailing her thoughts on the state of Australia

Rinehart has warned Australia is on the same track as Sri Lanka and Argentina in falling from prosperity to poverty due to a big-spending, regulation-heavy government and urged everyone to be ‘on guard’ against the ‘ruining effects of socialism’ in order to preserve the nation’s wealth.

She sounded the warning in a chapter for an upcoming book titled Australia Tomorrow edited by Jake Thrupp which features essays from prominent centre-right thinkers including former Prime Minister Tony Abbott, Deputy PM Barnaby Joyce and broadcaster Alan Jones.

‘For generation after generation, we have wanted to hand down a better country for our children,’ she wrote in her essay obtained in advance by Daily Mail Australia.

‘Sadly for this generation I believe this is now at risk, which the younger ones amongst us, in particular, should not want.’

Mrs Rinehart urged the Federal Government – which last year oversaw a record $167billion budget deficit, largely due to heavy spending to offset the crippling effect of Covid lockdowns – to show more fiscal restraint in the years to come.

‘Alluring political words of ”free this” and ”free that”, more taxpayers’ money for this or that, helped to turn once prosperous Ceylon, prosperous with its tea plantations and other agriculture, into a country which couldn’t support itself with food,’ she wrote, using the British colonial name for Sri Lanka which became independent in 1948.

‘Instead, its people faced hunger, loss of free speech, consequent damaging riots, property damage, unhappiness, police and military, and a country name change as it struggled with the results of its socialist path.’

Gina Rinehart has warned Australia will become impoverished like Sri Lanka if the government doesn't rein in spending and support businesses by stripping away onerous regulations. Pictured: Residents in Colombo, Sri Lanka

Gina Rinehart has warned Australia will become impoverished like Sri Lanka if the government doesn’t rein in spending and support businesses by stripping away onerous regulations. Pictured: Residents in Colombo, Sri Lanka

Mrs Rinehart, whose wealth soared by $2.2billion in the six months to May this year due to surging iron ore prices, also cited Argentina – which was the world’s tenth wealthiest nation per capita in 1913 but now suffers political instability, inflation and a 42 per cent poverty rate – as a cautionary tale of big government.   

‘The socialist policies of Peron and others saw incredible inflation, people unable to support their families, rioting; and the country has never regained its affluent position in the world, even 100 years later,’ she wrote, referencing Juan Peron, who nationalised Argentina’s large companies and set up social welfare programs when he became president in 1946. 

‘Sadly, the economy ruining effects of socialism don’t just last between elections. They last much, much longer,’ Mrs Rinehart wrote. 

‘We should be on guard against this and, in particular, the entitlement culture, big government, high taxes and government tape – these are problems that need to be faced, if we want Australia to continue to be the wonderful country that it has been.’

The 67-year-old Mrs Rinehart, who inherited a bankrupt mining business from her father Lang Hancock and built it up, said ‘agriculture, mining, small businesses, investment and defence are the keys to our nation and our future’.

She urged the government to ‘stop making decisions influenced by the media of the moment and instead act to make the bold decisions our country needs.’

A woman and a child walk as a man rides a bicycle along a street in Buenos Aires, Argentina

A woman and a child walk as a man rides a bicycle along a street in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Ms Rinehart sounded the warning in a chapter she wrote for an upcoming book titled Australia Tomorrow which has been edited by Alan Jones producer Jake Thrupp (pictured together)

Ms Rinehart sounded the warning in a chapter she wrote for an upcoming book titled Australia Tomorrow which has been edited by Alan Jones producer Jake Thrupp (pictured together)

Ms Rinehart also called for the regulation burden on businesses to be reduced, saying the long-time owners of Fossil Downs, a cattle station in the Kimberleys, were forced to sell up due to ‘government tape’.

‘John, the husband of the owner and manager, had to get up around 4am each morning, like most do on stations in the far north, but he wasn’t able to get to bed until around 1am, still doing government paperwork,’ she wrote.

The mother of four also slammed ‘crazy laws’ in the Northern Territory which prevent farm owners killing crocodiles and wild dogs to protect their livestock and land-clearing restrictions which have made some properties more vulnerable to bushfires.  

Mrs Rinehart referenced a report by free market think tank the Institute of Public Affairs which found there has been 80-fold increase to Commonwealth environmental regulation since the first Commonwealth environmental department was established in 1971.

The report in October 2019 called for environmental regulation to be placed solely in the hands of the states to reduce red tape.

In July last year Mr Morrison presented to National Cabinet plans to devolve federal legislation under changes to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act which are currently before the senate.

The Australia Tomorrow book was edited by Alan Jones’ producer Jake Thrupp and features essays from several Coalition MPs as well as Queensland Opposition Leader David Crisafulli and ACT Opposition Leader Elizabeth Lee.

‘These are prominent centre-right voices in Australia who have come together to provide the Coalition with a fresh sense of mission,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘For the Australian centre-right, a publication of this magnitude has never been done before.’

  • The Australia Tomorrow book is available online and in all good bookstores. Pre-order now via austomorrow.com. Edited by Jake Thrupp. Foreword by former PM John Howard. Preface by Peta Credlin. RRP $39.95. 

Key quotes from Gina Rinehart’s essay Australia And Our Future 

Mining magnate Gina Rinehart (pictured) wrote the brief essay for a new anthology, Australia Tomorrow

Mining magnate Gina Rinehart (pictured) wrote the brief essay for a new anthology, Australia Tomorrow

For generation after generation, we have wanted to hand down a better country for our children. Sadly, for this generation, I believe this is now at risk, which the younger ones amongst us, in particular, should not want. We need to better appreciate history

Alluring political words of ‘free this’ and ‘free that’, more taxpayers’ money for this or that, helped to turn once prosperous Ceylon, prosperous with its tea plantations and other agriculture, into a country which couldn’t support itself with food 

The increase in taxes and other socialist policies, saw Argentina become not only unable to feed itself, but the socialist policies of Peron and others, saw incredible inflation, people unable to support their families

Sadly, the economy ruining effects of socialism, don’t just last between elections. They last much, much longer. We should be on guard against this and, in particular, the entitlement culture, big government, high taxes and government tape

Agriculture, mining, small businesses, investment and defence are the keys to our nation and our future. We need our government to stop making decisions influenced by the media of the moment and instead act to make the bold decisions our country needs.

Sadly, excessive government tape makes it hard for businesses, especially small businesses, to survive.

Hundreds of millions of dollars of investment lie dormant under government tape in the Kimberleys; young cattle die cruel deaths because of crazy laws limiting wild dog baiting and crocodile killing in the NT, while crocodiles, wild dogs and other ferals mount to record levels; and given clearing laws which restrict clearing, around Australia mean that farmers, pastoralists and their family’s pets and staff are unsafe. Ditto their investment.       

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